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Le Cordon Bleu London or International Culinary Center NYC?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello, currently I have been accepted to both Le Cordon Bleu London (Actually in London now touring it) and International Culinary Center in New York City. After seeing both schools I'm very torn between either LCB or ICC, I truly can see myself in either school and truly love both cities. I was wondering what are your thoughts on either or both schools as well as what would you do in my position. A little about me to help some I'm going for baking and pastry, business management, and wine however if I went to LCB I would go for the grand diploma which means taking Culinary as well due to the fact I can apply for settlement, due to the courses taking 2 years of me being here... Not sure on that process totally. Thank you for your assistance, I'm truly stuck with deciding between schools.

post #2 of 10
Hello, did you end up going to Le Cordon Bleu or ICC? I'm currently trying to decide whether to go to LCB Paris or ICC in NYC. It would be very helpful if you could share some of your experience in which cooking school you picked. Thank you so much!
post #3 of 10

@mattk1100 would also like to hear where you ended up. @Vicky Geng I went to LCB in Paris (just a day class) and if I had the choice that is where I would go. Why you ask? Because I just love Paris and the chance to go to school there and enjoy the food an culture would be incredibly. If you could afford I would do that. The classes are all in French with an English translator as they have tons of students from many countries.

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicky Geng View Post

Hello, did you end up going to Le Cordon Bleu or ICC? I'm currently trying to decide whether to go to LCB Paris or ICC in NYC. It would be very helpful if you could share some of your experience in which cooking school you picked. Thank you so much!
I've toured both and spent a lot of time in both Paris and nyc, if you have any questions if love to help.
post #5 of 10
@makttk1100 Thanks for replying. I want to know in terms of school's teaching facility, method and teachers' qualifications, which school is better? Do you prefer living in one city over another? or about the same since they both offer so much in terms of culture and food. Thanks!
@nicko Thank you for offering your opinion. Just wondering the translation from French to English part in LCB would be a problem or not. What do you think?
post #6 of 10

If this was the 70s or 80s I would say the school  in France. But the USA has come so far in culinary knowledge and procedures and technology that I would have to say here now. The restaurants there are not what they used to be, while here they only get better. No matter what school you choose good luck to you. 

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicky Geng View Post

@makttk1100 Thanks for replying. I want to know in terms of school's teaching facility, method and teachers' qualifications, which school is better? Do you prefer living in one city over another? or about the same since they both offer so much in terms of culture and food. Thanks!
@nicko Thank you for offering your opinion. Just wondering the translation from French to English part in LCB would be a problem or not. What do you think?
both were so different that it's really hard to compare, icc had a newer and nicer facility it seemed like. lCB seemed smaller but the kitchen stations I liked much more. In terms of qualifications both are outstanding and it didn't seem like a factor, however ICC teaches through recipes it seems like while lcb just gives a ingredient list and you take your own notes on how to cook a given dish, seems like it more was how to learn to cook then follow the recipe. In terms of city, nyc I fell in love with each and every time I went there! So much to do and see and the food was great.. However, in coming from a small ski town (breckenridge) and nyc at the end of the day got loud. London and paris both fit me much better.. The food and culture there was amazing after getting used to. It just felt more "me" than nyc did. One thing you need to realize is the living expenses, nyc it's much easier due to no currency exchange asWell as icc offers dorms. In London or Paris you have to find a flat which is a large expense. I'm looking at around 98,000 for living cost alone. Any other questions?
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

If this was the 70s or 80s I would say the school  in France. But the USA has come so far in culinary knowledge and procedures and technology that I would have to say here now. The restaurants there are not what they used to be, while here they only get better. No matter what school you choose good luck to you. 
I thought the same thing, however Europe has such an amazing opportunity to travel and gain such a bank of knowledge of cultures and food.
post #9 of 10
Thanks everyone for sharing your thoughts. All my questions have been answered. I love both cities but I like the location of Paris better since I'll get the chance to easily travel around in Europe. I will make a decision soon. Cheers.
post #10 of 10

@Vicky Geng I am struggling with this exact dilemma right now. I've toured both schools and met faculty. I would love to know what your thoughts are since you are in the same boat. I personally made the following pro/con list:

 

Pros of ICC: 

- New facilities & equipment (they actually use things like kitchen aid mixers and food processors)

- Up to date with the latest food trends, especially those in the U.S.

- Will help prepare you for fast-paced, high volume American kitchens & overall line work 

- shorter program (6 months)

- cheaper than LCB Paris 

- you can obtain federal & private loans more easily for an American school vs foreign school

- everyone speaks english

- great internship/job connections through school

 

Cons of ICC:

- there is a big focus on speed and prep vs. technique

- housing is actually more expensive in NYC

- the culinary arts diploma only includes about 30% desserts, vs. LCB which does an equal amount of time dedicated to pastry

- no study abroad/foreign culture exposure

 

Pros of LCB Paris:

- classic culinary arts; heavy focus on technique and presentation 

- prestigious MOF teachers

- located in the heart of Paris 

- equal time spent on culinary and pastry, which in a way makes the program cheaper than an american one where you'd have to pay for two separate programs

- great location in Europe, making it easy to travel to other countries

- housing is more affordable than NYC

 

Cons of LCB Paris:

- Not all chefs speak English and are apparently incredibly strict

- Grand Diplome program can mean 14 hr days, very grueling and no time for working on the side or really traveling outside of Paris

- Internships are not guaranteed

- A financial commitment made upfront is necessary; no way to do financial installments 

- Doesn't necessarily prepare you for working in U.S. kitchens

- They don't have new equipment as kitchens are very small and they don't have room for machines like mixers and such.

- obtaining legal papers (visa, then later working papers if you want to stay and work in France can be tedious and expensive)

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