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Storing Knives and a new stone to sharpen

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

We have kids, we never leave the knives out.

We currently toss the bunch of them in a tupperware and store up high.

 

We are dumping the knife set we have, we actually only use a few knives.

 

Are there better storage options?

A locked box would be ideal?

 

What are people using?

post #2 of 7

I don't have kids so I have my knives up on a magnetic bar on the wall. 

 

Perhaps you can use a drawer insert

http://www.amazon.com/Totally-Bamboo-20-2091-In-Drawer-Knife/dp/B002RL9CZ4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1420288829&sr=8-1&keywords=in+drawer+knife+holder

 

Really you could store all you knives in a knife bag, and you're good to travel too:

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Ultimate-Edge-2001-EDB-Deluxe/dp/B002NEGSTS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1420288903&sr=8-1&keywords=ultimate+edge

 

Or use your current system, but you really should put edge guards on all the knives first so they don't bang into each other and dull.

post #3 of 7
I have kids, boys, and have kept my knives in a block on counter and on magnetic strips. They have been taught from day one to leave them alone, and they have always done so. The mag strips are mounted 5 ft off the floor but in full view. My youngest is 11 and has chef knife of his own, which is kept sleeved but in low drawer. He asks before using. Education may be as good as hiding but it depends a lot upon the temperment and ccuriousity of the individual child.
post #4 of 7

51%2BHDbFW4sL._SX300_.jpg

Something along these lines, a drawer, plus education.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #5 of 7

Search the forum under "knife storage blocks" and you will see a number of attractive options to the conventional block. I have one of these:

http://www.arborvacuum.com/products/wusthof-knife-block-10-slot-tiered-in-walnut  You can find them for less, and there are several other options to a block.

 

As to a stone(s), what are you using now, do you want to keep it all under $100 or can you do around $200, and where in the world are you located?

 

 

Rick

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have a block already.

 

I wanted something that I can keep away from the kids until they are older.

 

 

I also have a stone.

it is a rather cheap one.  Probably not correct, but I have been sharpening my knives.

 

What should I be looking for in a stone?

post #7 of 7

Typically used are waterstones, which produce anywhere from very little to a lot of a muddy abrasive slurry.  There is a lot of information in the forum on how to use them and what to get,  The cheapest option is a combination stone, typically 1k/6k grit, but there are other options.

 

Then you need something for truing, and understand that ordinary grooved steels just ruin your knives.  Some will just strop their knives on their high-grit waterstone.  I have a fine Arkansas that I rounded one of the edges for this purpose, it removes a little metal but is more like a polished steel, and more convenient, though quite arguably not as good as stopping on stone of some form of fine abrasive charged strop.  Something like an Idahone fine ceramic steel is probably the most  popular [good] option.

 

An Idahone and full-sized (2.5 x 7.25") combi will be as little as $80, and is all you need to get started, though you probably should have a 4-500 grit stone for thinning, which your knives are likely in desperate need of at this time.

 

 

Rick

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