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Burgers, stuffed or not

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Big difference between Omaha Steak burgers and BJs. BJs are to tuff and dry and it doesn't matter if eaten off the grill or reheated. I'm talking the fresh made burgers not frozen discs. I found adding some gelatin with an egg makes chop meat much more moist and not tuff. So bought a Bellmain burger press and I will be buying the chopmeat mixing with the dissolved gelatin and pressing my own burgers.

Amazon also offered in a package deal Cuisinart CSBP-100 3-in-1 Stuffed Burger Press. Nevef had a stuff burger so why would I. What is the different between stuffing inside burger or just chopping the fixing up and mixing them into the meat.
post #2 of 13

Read up on the Juicy Lucy. It's not to my taste, but it's probably the best known stuffed burger. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 13

Wow! Just learned about Juicy Lucy. Thanks Phatch. Have to try it.

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #4 of 13

I'm not a big fan of stuffed burgers-would rather just put the stuff on top so that I can cook my burger how I like it without having to worry is the the stuffing will get hot enough or done enough.

 

Why are you adding gelatin and egg to your burgers?  If you use the right mix of meats and fat (and grind properly) you shouldn't need all those additives for burgers.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
I bought a kitchen aid stand mixer with all the attachments to grind chop meat but never tried it, not sure what to use. I figure it would cost more than buying ground meat at BJs or Costco.
post #6 of 13

Grinding it yourself gives you a better idea of what exactly is in there. And you can tailor it to your taste. You might like, say 60% chuck for fat and texture, 40% sirloin for its flavor. And if you are into it, you can grind the meat with chunks of onion and garlic right in, for example. Or maybe chunks of bacon. And whenever there is a big E. Coli recall, it is always from preground products, it seems.

 

Personally I favor rather plain, straightfoward burgers, mostly ground chuck, adding flavor from toppings and sauces. But I have been thinking of trying some with bacon ground in and a blue cheese stuffing.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 13
I'd rather have the cheese on top but I've been know to stuff my burgers with a pat of compound butter.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 13

I once was served a burger stuffed with foie gras in a fancy restaurant, it was delicious. 

post #9 of 13

I like my toppings on top I never really cared for a stuffed burger.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
I once was served a burger stuffed with foie gras in a fancy restaurant, it was delicious.

  I would set aside my general dislike of stuffed burgers for this!!!!  :D

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
 
Quote:
I once was served a burger stuffed with foie gras in a fancy restaurant, it was delicious.

  I would set aside my general dislike of stuffed burgers for this!!!!  :D

I want to revisit the stuffed foie gras burger from a more technical standpoint. What doneness would try to achieve? Would you precook the foie gras? how thick would the foie gras be? How thick the entire burger? Would you use a leaner grind to counter the fattiness of the foie gras? 

 

I've never had foie gras because I don't get along with liver that well. So these questions interest me as I have no idea how to approach such a burger. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 13

Could be a worthy goal for the mince challenge.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

I want to revisit the stuffed foie gras burger from a more technical standpoint. What doneness would try to achieve? Would you precook the foie gras? how thick would the foie gras be? How thick the entire burger? Would you use a leaner grind to counter the fattiness of the foie gras? 

 

I've never had foie gras because I don't get along with liver that well. So these questions interest me as I have no idea how to approach such a burger. 

 

foie gras and liver are almost different animals, really. The burger I had was very, very good. In fact it was a slider, part of an "assiette de boeuf" which was a trio, I think a braised short rib, a seared filet and the slider. The slider was, by far, the shining star of the plate. 

 

I honestly don't know wether the foie gras was cooked or raw, I would say it was raw. The burger was a perfect medium-rare. It was a tiny little slice, maybe about 1/2" thick, 1" square surface. Maybe a bit smaller than that. I wouldn't use a leaner grind, I don't think it would hold together. I say embrace the fat. You're not trying to make this into something balanced. It's fat, luxurious, smooth, scrumptuous.... go with it. Eat shredded carrots the next day. ;)

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