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"Potato" Waffles  

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Been trying the waffle iron for 'hash browns'

 

Found that baking some extra potatoes (real baked not foil-baked!) and then slicing/chopping WITH SKIN - a bit of olive oil, salt, fresh pepper - and then to a golden-to-dark brown produces a really amazing product - crispy to a T.

 

Tried same with same type potatoes but raw (shredded) - and cooked to same 'color' - there remained a bitter taste - clearly from the skin - but I do want the skin in the final product.

 

Has anyone else been using the waffle iron for potatoes - or whatever other than traditional waffles? Hints? Ideas?

post #2 of 29
Never entered my mind.
Thanks for sharing your idea.
We rarely do hash browns but see an increase in the future.

mimi

Can the potatos be refrigerated after baking and used a few days later?
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 

The 'hash browns' come from the waffle iron just like you always dreamed they would be from the frying pan but never were  :-)

 

But as I say - they were best using previously baked potatoes - and if you want the skins, one seemingly can't use raw.

 

As for keeping in the fridge - I assume you mean keeping the baked potatoes in the fridge - sure can - and in fact the last time I made the hash browns, I hadn't even put them in the fridge - seems baked potatoes keep well enough 'out' for a couple of days.


Edited by Harry Coates - 1/6/15 at 5:39am
post #4 of 29

Try scrubbing the potato with a "green" scotch-brand (3M) style scrub pad. Potatoes are grown "in the ground" so, there may be any number of things that could be lingering on the outer jacket. It may also be the age of the potato. I've experienced that green potatoes can be a little bitter so try letting them hang around the pantry for a few weeks. Even if they're in there too long, a little wrinkly won't be a problem for hash-browns. Also, how well are you rinsing the fresh, shredded potato? For hash browns, I wouldn't use the same method as for fries. My opinion, you need the starch to bind things but then again, the starch may be the culprit too, especially if it starts to oxidize. Finally, your oil may have gone rancid. I'm guessing you might need to use more with the fresh potato and that definitely will make things bitter.

 

I enjoy eating the jacket of a potato so I've scrubbed them for longer than I can remember when baking. Actually, unless they're peeled, they always get scrubbed. Anyhow, try using that method and just shred the baked potato. If you're using a handheld, box-style grater it shouldn't be an issue. In fact, I use this method with baked potatoes for soup

post #5 of 29
Thanks gentlemen.
Next time we have bakers I will prepare a few extra and serve them up on "breakfast for supper nite"
But today is Taco Tuesday and shirked my promise of a few weeks back to make puffy shells.
Wonder who I can con into visiting our local Fiesta (grocery store) for the preprepared masa?
lol.gif

mimi
post #6 of 29


Yes they can and they can also be use for making O Brian potatoes, hashed in cream, scalloped au gratin. but peel first.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

post #7 of 29
Interesting how many things one can do with a waffle iron. I should pull one out and start experimenting.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

post #8 of 29

I just heard about someone putting cinnamon roll dough in the waffle iron.

 

Anyone used it to make paninis? Seems like that would work,

 

I was thinking recently a burger would be good. All that extra surface would make a good crust. But where would the grease go? Ew!

post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 

I really expect the cooking time with a waffle iron just isn't sufficient for the skin.

 

The potatoes were absolutely ok - I know about the 'green' effect.

 

Also - the olive oil was from a new, sealed bottle.

 

It just would all seem that if you want the skin, then don't try with raw potato.

 

++

 

And if using cooked - prefereably baked potato - don't dream you can 'shred' it - just slice and chop - it really ends up being irrelevant as it all molds together into a beautiful, CRISPY 'pancake.'

 

And never forget using a reputable TASTY potato - Rosamunde, Russet etc. There are so many tasteless potato-generic bummers for sale that never taste of anything except the garlic etc. you might pump into them,


Edited by Harry Coates - 1/6/15 at 8:16am
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Interesting how many things one can do with a waffle iron. I should pull one out and start experimenting.

 

Falafel. Instead of deep frying falafel mix, put it in the waffle iron. Amazing.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Coates View Post
 

And if using cooked - prefereably baked potato - don't dream you can 'shred' it - just slice and chop - it really ends up being irrelevant as it all molds together into a beautiful, CRISPY 'pancake.'

 

 

If you refrigerate the potato over night or for a couple days (this happens in pro kitchens all the time because of what remains at the end of the night), it will shred just fine and we're talking 1/4 or larger diameter hole for the shred (see below)

 

I've used them (baked potatoes that is) in an emergency pinch when I've needed potato baskets on the fly. Not happy about it but what do you do when you need one or two to finish plating a big banquet. Anyhow, it will hold it's "shape" better than you think. . As far as the waffle iron, I see where it could be irrelevant but experience tells me there will be some "texture" evident, especially around the edges. 

 

 

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 

Yeah - that's the grater type I use - a Microplane - pretty neat.

 

But for the waffle trick, I can avoid the bloody knuckles (use an oven mitt sometimes  :-)  ) with just slicing and a bit of a chop. I do get some texture.and the end product is one I can hardly expect to be better - not a usual result   :-)

 

The Microplane version is very sharp - but the baked skin does tend to be somewhat problematic.

 

++++

 

That Falafel idea looks good - one nice characteristic of the iron (a Tefal) is that it really needs a minimum of oil - and falafels can be such oil sponges.

 

Some comments above relate to cleaning up - indeed a problem as even the bit of oil hangs around. Paper towels can usually get most of it. Mine has permanent plates - and a new one so will not be out shopping for one with removable, washable plates.

post #13 of 29

There are a few videos circulating on Facebook and on the web with people cooking different things in waffle irons.  Some ideas look great and others, well....

post #14 of 29

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

post #15 of 29

@Harry Coates post some pics please it would be good to see what you are creating....

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
post #16 of 29
@Koukouvagia thanks for that link.
Printed out and stuck on the cork board for the Grands to use.
Have a feeling a new small appliance purchase is in my future lol.

mimi
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
@Koukouvagia thanks for that link.
Printed out and stuck on the cork board for the Grands to use.
Have a feeling a new small appliance purchase is in my future lol.

mimi

 

Some intereesting ideas there but a number of them weird - and really questionable as to results.

 

I think the BASIC idea behind all this is the actual physics involved here.

 

The waffle 'pattern' is a relatively thin layer of 'matter'that is being subjected to high, even heat - if I was a product manager of a kitchen appliance company, i would put designers to work on an appliance that had washable plates - with perhaps varied patterns -  that would START with the idea that the  appliance would be used for ots unique heating 'efficiency' - and the associated high heat 'crisping' capability.

post #18 of 29

LOL, had this a while back and sent to my nephews and nieces who were then in college, neat life hack.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=at7w8p5JOFM&index=6&list=PLA8z-oagowOQl_gVLC3jiQIv_pNuHsfPm

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Coates View Post

Quote:
@Koukouvagia thanks for that link.

Printed out and stuck on the cork board for the Grands to use.

Have a feeling a new small appliance purchase is in my future lol.


mimi

Some intereesting ideas there but a number of them weird - and really questionable as to results.

I think the BASIC idea behind all this is the actual physics involved here.

The waffle 'pattern' is a relatively thin layer of 'matter'that is being subjected to high, even heat - if I was a product manager of a kitchen appliance company, i would put designers to work on an appliance that had washable plates - with perhaps varied patterns -  that would START with the idea that the  appliance would be used for ots unique heating 'efficiency' - and the associated high heat 'crisping' capability.

Doesn't need to produce gourmet caliber dishes.
Any appliance that can 1. encourage the older Grands to take responsibility for feeding themselves occasionally and 2 provide a minimum amt of entertainment is ok in my book lol.

mimi
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Doesn't need to produce gourmet caliber dishes.

 

The post looks like it was addressed to me - so I do wonder why the defensive text - my original post was about HASH BROWNS - something that is probably on the bottom of the list at some Fine Dining joint.

 

I do think some of the 'recipes' on the video are a bit over the top and don't even think they would work for the waffle iron - and are not really using the characteristics of the iron that I think are what offers special possibilities.

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Coates View Post

Quote:
Doesn't need to produce gourmet caliber dishes.

The post looks like it was addressed to me - so I do wonder why the defensive text - my original post was about HASH BROWNS - something that is probably on the bottom of the list at some Fine Dining joint.

I do think some of the 'recipes' on the video are a bit over the top and don't even think they would work for the waffle iron - and are not really using the characteristics of the iron that I think are what offers special possibilities.

Not defending anything.
Just an honest answer to a fun thread.
My current waffle iron has pop out plates and after using so simple to run thru dishwasher.
So not only do I have a new toy for the older kids and their current new hobby of eating but the main tool is easily cleaned dried and put away BEFORE they leave.
Win win.

mimi
post #22 of 29
Quote:

The post looks like it was addressed to me - so I do wonder why the defensive text - my original post was about HASH BROWNS - something that is probably on the bottom of the list at some Fine Dining joint.

 

I do think some of the 'recipes' on the video are a bit over the top and don't even think they would work for the waffle iron - and are not really using the characteristics of the iron that I think are what offers special possibilities.

@Harry Coates, dude and with any, due respect, it's a friggin waffle iron! By description is used to make (wait for it) WAFFLES!!! Hash browns=Not Waffles, so your looking to use an appliance in a way, that it wasn't designed for.

 

You're a newbie (welcome to CT btw!) and asked for help, were given some pretty good advice, imho, now you seem to be critical of the advice.

 

The videos actually SHOW alternate uses and your comments is you don't "think they would work for the waffle iron" "not really using the characteristics of the iron that I think are what offers special possibilities." The videos show them in practice so I'm @ a loss cause I can't figure out what it is you expect.

 

CT is an eclectic group of folks very interested in food and sharing those experiences. If someone, like yourself, seeks advice, they are welcomed to ask for help / advice from those that range from professionals, including award winning chefs and restaurant owners to very serious "foodies". That advice is freely given without prejudice to the acumen of anyone including an "at home cook"

 

Would think you would be happy that you have found such a place. Be nice, lighten up, and waffle on!

 

 

Cheers!

 

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 

No lightening up necessary -

 

I was myself pointing out another use - that made something quite quite good.

 

I asked for other comments - someone posted a list of some 10 uses - I had seen them before - and a number of them SEEMED to me to not be using the actual 'technical' reason that I think the iron offers - and also guaranteeing a huge sloppy mess :-)

 

I don'ät know if your post is intended to have me go find another place to troll or what.

post #24 of 29

Waffles can bring on such passionate feelings!  I'm really wanting a waffle right about now!

 

What else can we make with a waffle iron?  

 

I have a waffle iron that I got as a wedding gift, it's in the kitchen but it needs a good cleaning and I don't have the instruction booklet.  How does one clean a waffle iron?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Waffles can bring on such passionate feelings!  I'm really wanting a waffle right about now!

What else can we make with a waffle iron?  

I have a waffle iron that I got as a wedding gift, it's in the kitchen but it needs a good cleaning and I don't have the instruction booklet.  How does one clean a waffle iron?

If the plates are reversible they should just pop out.
Then either hot soapy hand wash or pop into the dishwasher.
The rest just paper towels and some 409 will do the trick.
If one piece the same just don't immerse in water (duh).

We had cheeseburger sliders with grilled onions last nite.
Mine is a reverse able so has a couple of drain channels thank goodness or as Harry suggested the mess would have been a huge turn off.

mimi
post #26 of 29
If I can reach it I'll get it down! Thanks for the tip. But 409, really you put harsh chemicals on appliances you cook with @flipflopgirl?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

post #27 of 29
@Koukouvagia If you have a favorite cleaner just use that instead.
After years of restaurant kitchens hospitals and barns 409 is mild lol.
Of course I protect the parts that recieve food contact and wipe until dry.

Try the little cheeseburgers.......
mimi
post #28 of 29

We had an electrical waffle maker at home. I can remember my mam making waffles just once or twice.

It was always used for making toasted sandwiches.

 

Took me a long time to figure out what a "normal" toasted sandwich looked like (and they looked boring, no nice waffle pattern....)

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

post #29 of 29

This discussion seems like it is no longer helpful shutting it down..

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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