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Whole-Grain Griddle Breads

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Any suggestions for the beginner?


Edited by OregonYeti - 1/11/15 at 10:17pm
post #2 of 12
Thread Starter 

I made some whole wheat pitas and I used my electric skillet instead of a stove-top griddle. My results were good for a first try.

 

I got the idea from a news article that said displaced Syrians in Turkey had simple kitchens that included an electric skillet for making breads. If they are using electric skillets, that must be a good way to go. Syrians and Lebanese know as much about flatbreads as anyone in the world, I think.

post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonYeti View Post
 

I made some whole wheat pitas and I used my electric skillet instead of a stove-top griddle. My results were good for a first try.

 

I got the idea from a news article that said displaced Syrians in Turkey had simple kitchens that included an electric skillet for making breads. If they are using electric skillets, that must be a good way to go. Syrians and Lebanese know as much about flatbreads as anyone in the world, I think.


Those do come out good.  It is like a thinner, better homemade English muffin.

 

Back to OP.  You can try some wheat English muffins, they're real simple, but take some time b/c they must rise.

 

If you are looking for something like a pancake, You can use basic ratios and just substitute and play and see what you get.  I either toy with a wheat cake or a corn cake recipe depending on what I want.  I'd say start with Alton Brown's basic pancake mix:

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/instant-pancake-mix-recipe.html

 

keep the ratio of flour the same but swap out different things.  I have had good results with adding other grain flours, teff that sits for quite awhile before adding (keep the total liquid ratio the same when combining the mix with the pancake recipe).  If you end up using flours that are less fine, you may need to add a little more liquid.  You can play with the liquid ratio too to see how they cook up.  If you want them thinner and not as dense, add more.

 

Hope this helps. Peace.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks, McKallidon!

post #5 of 12

Hey no prob.  I was actually happy to oblige.  I was doing this for awhile 6 months back after I had these awesome gluten free griddle cakes somewhere and I was excited to share some experience.  It's funny what they charged because they were so cheap to make.  A place near me does oatmeal pancakes, johnny cakes (although all corn is GMO now unless you spend $), and buckwheat pancakes.  I was trying to actually write down some recipes, but I got too into the playing.  I want to try almond floour and see how it tastes when it browns.  If I could get some toasted almond imitation, I have a few tricks on what to do with it. 

 

Check out injera, which is an ethiopian flatbread/pancake made from teff, which is super nutritious.  Lots of cool stuff you could base ideas off of.  Whole foods and Amazon will charge a lot for grain or flour, but if you find an ethiopian market, it os very cheap.

 

Happy cooking!

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

You're pretty much on the same track I am.

 

I love injera. I had some Ethiopian friends and loved when they invited me to dinner. I've read about making authentic injera and it's not all that easy, but I might try it some time. The pancake style breads, I would be into more but I don't want to make a habit of eating baking powder since I'm iffy on the health part of it. Yeast pancakes, I will try some time--I haven't yet.

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

I just made a big pancake using whole wheat flour, about 1/2 cup, with rolled oats, about 1/3 cup, with just water and salt. I cooked it with a little melted butter on my electric griddle. I managed to flip it like I flip fried eggs. I was impressed with how I got lucky and it flipped nicely, all 11" of it. Nothing spilled.

 

The rolled oats in combination with the whole wheat flour made a great texture. Neither would have been as good alone.


Edited by OregonYeti - 2/24/15 at 7:28pm
post #8 of 12

I made it a few times and it came out okay.  I make this chickpea veggie stew that I put on it and it was a hearty and clean meal.  I still have this enormous bag of the flour.  There are some Ethipopian markets in my city that are really cheap.  The Bob's Red Mill teff flour is pricey compared to their bulk sections.

 

Very nice.  There is a little greasy spoon in another neighborhood by mine that always does oatmeal pancakes which are pretty good.

 

New Idea.  I was in a large Indian market the other week and besides the large selection of bulk rice, they have these huge sacks of flours that are all mixed grains, with or without wheat.  These are not besan/gram flour.  They usually included corn, millet and rice flours, and other stuff I didn't take note of at the time.  I wasn't paying much attention at the time but I'm going back to see the mixes and pricing now that we are discussing the topic.  I think one was 10lbs for $10 which isn't too bad.  May be worthy of experimenting with, especially figuring out portioning and food cost.  I imagine it is cheaper wholesale.  I'll snap pics and post them next time I go so you get an idea of what I am talking about.

 

As a side note, they also had fresh turmeric that actually looked decent.  I'm going to get some when I go back and make turmeric tea.

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

What did you make a few times that came out ok? Injera?

 

In my village we only have one Indian grocer. I've never seen flours of mixed grains there. That would be interesting, though I would probably make my own mix so I could have a more exact recipe. I've seen atta for making chapatis, and besan of course.

 

I've experimented with making my own version of baking powder using equal parts by volume of powdered calcium carbonate and citric acid. By weight, using the CaCO3 and C6H8O7 I have, the 1-1 volume ratio comes close to the mass ratio needed for complete reaction of the two to produce carbon dioxide (about 3 to 4).

 

I made something that turned out very good--I made a kind of pancake using 1 c. besan, 1/2 t of my baking powder, 1/2 t salt, chopped Indian green chilis, chopped green onions, chopped parsley and cilantro, 1/2 c sunflower seeds, and about 1 c. water. I mixed these, let the batter sit 10 minutes, then cooked like regular pancakes, using sunflower oil in a non-stick 6" fry pan. After cooking them I spread a little masti chutney on top. Made me happy. I grew up in India with pakoras and and I thought these were just as good.              Edit: sunflower seeds are not traditional in pakoras, and definitely not needed.


Edited by OregonYeti - 2/28/15 at 8:31am
post #10 of 12

Yeah, the injera.  Its a pain just because it has sit.

 

I saw how to make baking powder in an old cookbook I picked up with a huge section on substitutions and equivalencies.  That book was awesome because it had this chart on what every grain and legume came out to in volume after soaking or cooking.  I use that section all the time. 

 

I've seen savory pancake recipes and such like that.  It sounds good. 

post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

I think my whole wheat and oats pancakes might be my best experiment ever. (People who know me know I do a lot of weird experimenting). The oats soften the wheat, and the wheat in turn holds it together. I love the flavor and the texture. I'll be taking it for lunch at work, at room temperature in a ziploc bag, and there are a lot of things I know I will like with it. A fiery pepper, tomato, and onion thing with boied eggs simmered in it is one I will have with it. My homemade hummus. Chicken curry. Egg salad. Doro wat.


Edited by OregonYeti - 3/1/15 at 11:01pm
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm about to find out why people stopped cooking wheat as they do rice. I'm making some steamed wheat "berries", cooked like rice.

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