or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › It amazes me how many customers say this
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

It amazes me how many customers say this

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

It's amazes how many customers say How can it so long to cook my food. They don't consider all the food that has to be cooked before their food when it is busy. I've read it on trip adviser loads of times. It amazes me I would have thought it would be obvious. Just having a rant lol

 

 

post #2 of 16

People usually understand their little corner of the universe, but not other neighborhoods.

 

Little johnny (I just picked a name, any will do) has a cough in the middle of the night and a mild temperature. Loving parents rush him to the ER. Parents get frustrated when little johnny is not seen in what they deem a proper amount of time. Parents raise hell and create an ugly disturbance with staff.

 

Parents don't realize ambulances rolled in with critical patients from 10 car pile up on freeway. Also there is a 3 year old that fell from a third story balcony. Not to mention the single mother of four who suffered a massive brain hemorrhage while shopping for her family's dinner. Etc. etc. etc.

 

Remember your frustration with customers at the moment and the way it makes you feel the very  next time you are standing in a line somewhere waiting god knows how long for something.

 

Quote: Ghandi
 If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Parents don't realize ambulances rolled in with critical patients from 10 car pile up on freeway. Also there is a 3 year old that fell from a third story balcony. Not to mention the single mother of four who suffered a massive brain hemorrhage while shopping for her family's dinner. Etc. etc. etc.

Well today's grocery prices can do that to any Mum these days. :look: But on the other hand, lets not forget when

little Johnny was actually coughing up blood, the waiting room had only 3 people in it, you talked to them and

discover they've been here for 3 hours already, you look over and see two ER nurses talking about one's

scumbag boyfriend, while the receptionist is on the phone..... sounds like her Mum--then when you finally do

get him seen, they walk you back and you realize there are only two beds filled out of 12. Just sayin.. :)

 

Seriously, the worser scenario IMO is when you have servers lined up at the pass, all griping at you to get THEIR

food up first, what's taking so long, my customer's in a hurry, why haven't you done my side yet, me first, no me

first, no.... my table's not gonna tip me now, that's on your head (I SO care! lol) blah blah.

People are an impatient breed--especially when they're hungry.  Y'all should behold my youngest daughter--

she waits to long to eat she starts turning colors and making imminent regurgitation sounds. :suprise: 

For some reason that seems to get her food expedited. :) 

post #4 of 16

Pet peeve:

 

The village in which my restaurant is located has a busy train station shuttling day trippers to and from the cities around. Typical tableside conversation with the waitress which is then relayed to us in the kitchen while we're getting slammed: "We have to catch our train in 40 minutes. Will we be able to finish our meals in time?"

 

Then one of them can't decide what they're having and takes 15 minutes to place the order.

 

If they're late for their train, it's either the waitress' fault for not idling at their table for 15 minutes, waiting to take the order, or the kitchen's fault for being too slow to process their ticket as well as the ten others already piled up. Or both.

post #5 of 16
Quote:

Originally Posted by Meezenplaz View Post

lets not forget when little Johnny was actually coughing up blood, the waiting room had only 3 people in it, you talked to them and

discover they've been here for 3 hours already, you look over and see two ER nurses talking about one's

scumbag boyfriend, while the receptionist is on the phone..... sounds like her Mum--then when you finally do

get him seen, they walk you back and you realize there are only two beds filled out of 12. Just sayin.. :)

My wife worked as an ER nurse for the vast majority of her career, your representation is a perfect example of

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

People usually understand their little corner of the universe, but not other neighborhoods.

 

Your comment was truly a disservice to health care professionals everywhere.

 

For the sake and well being of ChefTalk, I am not letting my wife know about this post.:eek:

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #6 of 16

So you found yourself staring at my post, and made a conscious decision to take me seriously.

Really Chef.....you're a man smart enough (and have certainly seen my posts enough) to know I was making a

joke out of the ...rather one sidedness of your comment. (and if you read back on me, you'll see I routinely find this

kind of literary bait irresistible. :-) I didn't call your post a disservice to anyone, while I certainly could have.

But I saw your analogy as a bit extreme, I figured you'd intended it that way, so I played the devil's advocate with an

opposite extreme. Such is the mind of Meez. :rolleyes:

 

On the other hand, I have in all serious had a similar (though not as extreme) scenario happen in an ER when my

daughter was young. It just goes to show the shoe does alternate feet, be it medical, the food industry, banks, or

your local Starbuck's. And while I'm expected to be tolerant of others' unknown situations, I feel I'm reasonable in 

expecting likewise, yet don't always get it. And yes, the same has applied on the cookline.

 

All that being said, I suppose it was unfortunate you chose an analogy so close to your heart. Had I known this, I

probably would have used a different one to illustrate the opposite viewpoint--again, with tongue loosely in cheek. 

So for that I do apologize, as I meant no serious disrespect to either you,  your wife, or her profession.

 

And feel free to show your wife my post...you're both welcome to  PM me with any questions about my true feelings

regarding the medical community. :) 

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recky View Post
 

Pet peeve:

 

The village in which my restaurant is located has a busy train station shuttling day trippers to and from the cities around. Typical tableside conversation with the waitress which is then relayed to us in the kitchen while we're getting slammed: "We have to catch our train in 40 minutes. Will we be able to finish our meals in time?"

 

Then one of them can't decide what they're having and takes 15 minutes to place the order.

 

If they're late for their train, it's either the waitress' fault for not idling at their table for 15 minutes, waiting to take the order, or the kitchen's fault for being too slow to process their ticket as well as the ten others already piled up. Or both.


Yes and the maddening thing about that is the next time they come, rather than arriving early to compensate

for slower ticket times at that hour, they repeat exactly the same behavior--every visit. Its like blaming the

train engineer for being on time because you're running late. Which they probably do after they leave your

restaurant. lol

post #8 of 16

Recky, 

Would it be possible or worth your time to come up with a special "Train Menu"? Modify some of your dishes or create a few new ones with the ingredients you have on hand to make them quick to prepare and serve, print a separate menu and post a sign that announces the special menu for anyone waiting for a train. Limit the menu to a small number of items to lessen the dithering over choices. Or a prix fixe menu with salad or appetizer, entree and dessert, in and out in half hour? 

I used to hear that concern from theater goers occasionally but never often enough to make any adjustments. 

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post
 

Recky, 

Would it be possible or worth your time to come up with a special "Train Menu"? Modify some of your dishes or create a few new ones with the ingredients you have on hand to make them quick to prepare and serve, print a separate menu and post a sign that announces the special menu for anyone waiting for a train. Limit the menu to a small number of items to lessen the dithering over choices. Or a prix fixe menu with salad or appetizer, entree and dessert, in and out in half hour? 

I used to hear that concern from theater goers occasionally but never often enough to make any adjustments. 


chefwriter,

 

thing is, if we were catering exclusively for train catchers, we would certainly do that, but Recky's place is tiny, three starters and ten mains, three of the latter a la minute pastas (spatzle) and the remainder ribeye, pork neck, lamb round steaks, schnitzel and trout plus one or two very local specialities. The tourists love that kind of menu, and most of it is pretty quick. The pasta can be on the table within 5 to 10 minutes, depending, but the steaks take their time, grill, oven and resting. Given the limited number of choices, I don't understand how some people still struggle to place their order....

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meezenplaz View Post
 


Yes and the maddening thing about that is the next time they come, rather than arriving early to compensate

for slower ticket times at that hour, they repeat exactly the same behavior--every visit. Its like blaming the

train engineer for being on time because you're running late. Which they probably do after they leave your

restaurant. lol


Meez, that's exactly what it feels like sometimes. Those train catchers are never the same people again, so one might be forgiven to say 'f**k 'em', but for some inexplicable reason I don't think like that. They just might come back next year or the year after. And when we get slammed you just don't know who's who, they might be from round here or their relatives, so you treat everyone the same. It's difficult not to get cynical in a tourist destination...

post #11 of 16

i never understood the american need to always be in a hurry. I was out with my parents and siblings and one of them commented on the food taking longer then it should and others were agreeing, and i was simply like, so what? We're here enjoying each other's company.

post #12 of 16

Strangely, here in Northern Europe it is city people who are more likely to enjoy themselves at a restaurant and spend some quality time in good company. In rural areas, it's often a matter of "in, stuff yer face, and out, sod starters or desserts". Drives me crazy!

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recky View Post
 


chefwriter,

 

thing is, if we were catering exclusively for train catchers, we would certainly do that, but Recky's place is tiny, three starters and ten mains, three of the latter a la minute pastas (spatzle) and the remainder ribeye, pork neck, lamb round steaks, schnitzel and trout plus one or two very local specialities. The tourists love that kind of menu, and most of it is pretty quick. The pasta can be on the table within 5 to 10 minutes, depending, but the steaks take their time, grill, oven and resting. Given the limited number of choices, I don't understand how some people still struggle to place their order....


I have an answer to that. Don't go into a packed out restaurant if your in a  hurry :lol:

post #14 of 16

Slow service has many facets, from the kitchen to the FOH.

 

I worked in a dinner theater and every Thursday was matinee day so we fed over 700 people between 11:30 and 1:30. The show started at 2:00 and we had to be finished.

 

On the other side of the coin...I know all too well that many places, (especially corporate franchises) tend to have ticket times and insist the customer be treated as cattle.

I dislike with a passion, the server that brings me my entre when I haven't finished my appetizer.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recky View Post
 

Strangely, here in Northern Europe it is city people who are more likely to enjoy themselves at a restaurant and spend some quality time in good company. In rural areas, it's often a matter of "in, stuff yer face, and out, sod starters or desserts". Drives me crazy!

 

Dont forget the potatoes. At least here in Norway, you can never serve mains without potato.

post #16 of 16

in the US, its fries. We don't have fries on the menu, but if someone asks for fries, we'll make it for them. Last Saturday we went through over 50 lbs of potatoes just on fries!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › It amazes me how many customers say this