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Looking for an old Escoffier Cookbook - Page 3

post #61 of 85
Thread Starter 

Thanks.  I will check it out.

 

Lily

post #62 of 85
Thread Starter 

Eolian.

 

The free book appears to be very similar to the 1941 edition I have, but the recipes have French names rather than the Americanized ones in my cookbook. The pages do not match up exactly, so I know there are differences somewhere.  Poultry begins on page 486 of my 1941 version, and on page 473 of the free 1907 version.  Thank you for giving it to me as a resource.  I find all of this so interesting.  I also still have hope of locating the recipe I am seeking.  It may be in just that one edition I have not located yet.  

 

Lily

post #63 of 85
Your best bet continues to be the new edition i linked to earlier which is advertised as unabridged, & is a reprint of a translation that was in print in the sixties or seventies. Like I said before, they're all the same book, but the Escoffier Cookbook is pretty heavily cut down- by a couple thousand recipes.
post #64 of 85
Thread Starter 

Grande,

 

I have tried to find this edition at my local bookseller with no luck.  $50.00 is a lot to pay to just look and see if the recipe is there, so I don't want to order it, then have to return it.  Books a Million does not even have it in their system according to the clerk I spoke with today, so I could not even order it from them if I wanted to.

 

I may have to call a mall or a smaller book shop.  Do they even exist anymore?  Amazon is such a juggernaut, I think a lot of people just order online like I usually do.  I will continue to seek it out.

 

I just had an idea.  I could probably order it through Barnes & Noble with the understanding that I could look through it before I buy it.  I'll call them and find out.

 

Lily 

post #65 of 85
Thread Starter 

Grande,

 

The book you linked me to is not a pay in advance book, so I have ordered it at B&N and it should be in this week.  I can look at it before I buy it.  Strange thing is that if I buy the book that comes to the store it will cost $70.00.  On there website it is listed at just under $50.00.  Even if it has the recipe I want, I won't be buying it in the store, and surely they must know that. I would buy it from Amazon where I have Prime and rewards points.

 

Thanks for reminding me of your link and the difference in the book.  You did not seem sure if there were more recipes and someone commented on Amazon that it was the same as the others, but it is not called the Escoffier Cookbook, and it claims to have 5,000 recipes.  Hopefully I will find out soon.

 

Lily

post #66 of 85
I've been drooling over that edition since it came, the price tag has been keeping me from buying it! Hopefully I'll be procuring one soon.
post #67 of 85
Thread Starter 

Grande.

 

I'll let you know what I find out when I see it.

 

Lily

post #68 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilygardener View Post
 

I did find a recipe similar to the one you scanned in the Escoffier Cookbook I actually own (purchased from Amazon by mistake thinking it was the one I wanted).  It was published in 1941, has a gray cover with a purplish Ink forming the writing "The Escoffier Cookbook".  In your 1985 version the recipe you scanned was #3146.  In my 1941 version recipe # 1623 is called Chicken Breasts with Oysters


 I have the edition you are asking about (Published 1969 by Crown Publishers, Inc). I doubt you will find it significantly different from your earlier edition from 1941. Recipe # 1623 is the same in my edition as yours however if I can offer any help from the book please let me know.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #69 of 85
Thread Starter 

DuckFat and all,

 

I just received an email that the comprehensive edition of Escoffier has arrived at the bookstore.  I plan to go there today and see if it has anything like the recipe I remember.  What does the cloth cover of you 1969 edition look like?

 

Lily

post #70 of 85
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lilygardener View Post

 

What does the cloth cover of you 1969 edition look like?

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

The Escoffier Cook Book (and guide to the Fine Art Of Cookery)

ISBN 0-517-506629

Crown Publishers Inc.

1969

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

 


Edited by cheflayne - 1/23/15 at 3:58pm
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #71 of 85
Thread Starter 

I still think the cover of the book I had was black but had the single word ESCOFFIER embossed on the top of the front cloth cover.  Did not make it to the bookstore today; husband had dental surgery yesterday and have to do some things for him.  Tomorrow I will have more time to sit and look through the book.

 

Lily

post #72 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilygardener View Post

I still think the cover of the book I had was black but had the single word ESCOFFIER embossed on the top of the front cloth cover.  Did not make it to the bookstore today; husband had dental surgery yesterday and have to do some things for him.  Tomorrow I will have more time to sit and look through the book.

Lily

Aghhhhh!
I just KNEW we would have our answer today !!!!!
Family always come first tho.
I have some dental white knuckling coming up myself.
Pass along my get well soon to the hubby.

mimi
post #73 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilygardener View Post
 

  What does the cloth cover of you 1969 edition look like?

 

 

 

The cover on mine is exactly like the 70's version Cheflayne posted. Not a cloth cover. The binding is embossed in Gold print.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #74 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post
 

 

 

The cover on mine is exactly like the 70's version Cheflayne posted. Not a cloth cover. The binding is embossed in Gold print.

 

Dave


The one I posted just above is the 1969 Crown Publisher, Inc. version (The Escoffier Cook Book and guide to the Fine Art of Cookery). It contains 2984 recipes. Earlier I posted one with an orange cover that is the 1982 Mayflower Books, Inc. version (Le Guide Culinaire) translated by H.L. Cracknell and R.J. Kaufmann. It contains 5012 recipes.

 

I have been through the poultry sections of both editions and seen nothing even remotely resembling the recipe being looked for, but I am still very curious and would love to see the riddle solved.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #75 of 85
Keeping in mind that Escoffier calls for ham in his mirepoix, and that all he has to do is csll for one sauce & a splash of chicken stock to have you making stock all morning, it sounds like it could be almost anything.
post #76 of 85
Thread Starter 

To all,

 

I spent time at Barnes and Nobel this afternoon looking through all the recipes involving chicken in the exhaustive Escoffier Guide to the Culinary Arts.   I did not find my recipe.  

 

I am bewildered, but am now thinking about looking up cookbooks that were published in the 1960s and early 70s in the hope of finding ones that involved intricate stock making and stuffed chicken breasts, hopefully, one named Chicken Elizabeth.  What is the most confusing is that I remember having been a fan of Escoffier ever since making the dish, thinking it was his.  I also do not remember the recipe written as the Guide Culinaire writes them, the recipes were more user friendly.  Is it at all possible that someone interpreted Escoffier's recipes using more user friendly directions?  

 

Thank you all for all the help.  Like a young lifetime of recipes that was lost in a move many years ago, this recipe is likely lost also.  Sigh!  :cry:

 

Lily

post #77 of 85
People also in my experience rarely follow recipes especially avid home cooks who have made a recipe before might add their own enhancements or combine two recipes by different authors. Maybe you are looking for a dish also known as Chicken Elizabeth? Not that I'm doing anything to narrow the search but the likelihood that you are looking for an obscure recipe that seems to exist in one obscure place seems less likely than either inaccuracy in your memory or what I proposed above!
post #78 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

This edition has a recipe for Chicken Elizabeth.  It is listed as Chicken, white of, Elizabeth.
http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/history/social-and-population-history/guide-modern-cookery

I don't have a copy, so I have no idea if it is the one you are looking for or not because I also found it in this one




but I am fairly certain that it is not the one that you are looking for




One wouldn't think it, but some editions of Escoffier contain recipes unknown in others. There was an old leather bound French edition I browsed many times in a book shop. I was impressed by its number of game recipes for small birds. Just when I decided to purchase it, well it had been sold. In the meantimes I own two editions of his guide culinaire and one of Ma Cuisine. Neither treat some of the rare birds so present in that old edition.
post #79 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschool1982 View Post

This is the October 1963, 24th printing copy.




Looking through the entire section of poultry, couldn't find a chicken dish by that name. There were also several that required split or multiple prep procedures for completion. 

An apology to the OP for the change in author but I ran across these while trying to locate where the heck my copy of Escoffier went and definitely a Shnikee worthy cookbook find as far as age.......including newspaper/magazine clippings from 1920's-30's in one......after all, they're almost 100 years old! I found them in a box my mother packed to give to our daughter. Guess the thought was to create a bit of intrigue seeing what people were eating so long ago. Heck, I thought that myself.

From 1924......




and 1925.....


post #80 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilygardener View Post

Hello!  I am trying to locate the name, publication date, and or ISBN number for an old Escoffier Cookbook.

Sometime in the early to mid 1970's I borrowed a black Cookbook without a dust cover from a library in New Orleans.  It had the single word ESCOFFIER embossed across the top of the front fabric cover.  I do not remember if ESCOFFIER was the whole title or not, but it was all that was on the fabric front cover. Unlike an Escoffier Cookbook I bought thinking it was the one I was looking for, the book I'm looking for had detailed directions for preparing everything.

The book I'm seeking to identify contained a recipe I believe (it was a long time ago) was called Chicken Elizabeth.  To prepare it I had to spend the morning preparing two stocks and the afternoon preparing a stuffing for and cooking the breasts.  There was nothing easy about the process, but the dish was absolutely delicious. I would love to find this book so I can replicate that dish and try some of Escoffier's other recipes.

Can anyone help?

Lilygardener 
Looking at a Flammarion reprint of a 1921 edition there is no chicken Elizabeth to be found in the Guide Culinaire. Also, it's recipes are most often simply reminders, as he calls them memory aides, for professional chefs; often just a few lines.
post #81 of 85
Thread Starter 

You are absolutely right.  The sauces would have been more economical in a restaurant where they would have been used in several applications instead of my one dish.  

post #82 of 85
Thread Starter 

SpoiledBroth,

 

I agree now, but I was younger in the 1970's and this was the most challenging and expensive meal I had ever made.  I followed whatever recipe(s) I was using as exactly as I could. I know for a fact that I had an Escoffier cookbook in my hands in the kitchen that day.  What I am doubting now is that it was the one I used.  However, I had never made stock before, and the book I was following called for two homemade stocks and gave the recipes.  How many cookbooks with complex recipes like that like that could have been on the market some 45-50 years ago, and available in the New Orleans public library?

 

Lily

post #83 of 85
Well, before 45 or 50 years ago, canned stock wouldn't have been much of an option, and even then not a good one, so it's totally reasonable. Any, especially french cookbook from up to the 40's for sure would have them. And NOLA, a hotbed of good & french cooking with an established local cuisine. Maybe it was from a creole cookbook?
post #84 of 85
Thread Starter 

Grande,

 

Creole is a lot like French, so it could have been Creole, but I have no memory of that at all.  

 

Lily

post #85 of 85
Thread Starter 

DavidMatthews,

 

I can say with certainty that I could not have created the dish I made with just a few reminders.  I was confident in my cooking ability but had no restaurant experience at all and was not experienced at fancy cooking.  There were specific directions in the book I used.  

 

Up until that time I learned to cook by calling my mother's housekeeper (most middle class families had one back then), and she would tell me how to cook what I was preparing that night (I never learned to cook at home, we had the cook 5 nights a week and went out the other 2).  After learning a few basic techniques during the first few weeks after moving away from home, I could cook anything we normally ate.

 

Those skills were supplemented by recipes from the numerous woman's magazines for sale in every supermarket in the sixties.  I've been preparing Shrimp and Wild Rice, accompanied by creamed spinach in tart shells, a tomato accompaniment (usually a thick slice of a large beefsteak topped with provolone and broiled), and a three green salad with tart and tangy dressing that I got from a Southern Living article about a New Year's Eve buffet, for many years,  That was so many years ago, I don't even remember when.  Those were some of the recipes I lost in the move that I've referred to before, but I knew them by heart.  That Shrimp and Wild Rice still appears in Southern Living favorites sections of their year books from time to time, but they use an instant rice instead of the original recipe Uncle Ben's Wild and White Rice, and instead of a white sauce to make the creamed spinach, I use Philadelphia cream cheese; it  is a lot easier and tastes better to me.  The original menu had cherry tomatoes stuffed with a yogurt mixture which I didn't like, but my sister-in-law helped herself to about half of what I had prepared off of the sideboard before dinner was even announced.  It is a good thing, no one else really ate many.

 

Lily

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