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Searching for a product....HELP!!!!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

We are a fan of that Swiss air-dried cured beef called Bundnerfleisch.

We used to get it from European Imports but they don't carry it any more.

Looked it up and found out that for some reason it is not available unless you purchase it from Uruguay?

 

Can anybody shed some light on this?

We love it and miss it....

post #2 of 9

Hey @Chefross tomato tomoto Bundnerfleisch is Swiss air dried beef which I'm sure you already knew, also known as Bresaola or Punta D'Anaca. Bündnerfleisch is pressed, bresaola is not, it's pretty easy to make, if you can't find it be happy to pass along a recipe.

 

 

Cheers,

 

EDG


Edited by EverydayGourmet - 1/13/15 at 12:44pm

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #3 of 9

Found this, confirms what we both said, but $80/kilo??!!, would make it before buy it @ that price, edg

 

http://www.igourmet.com/shoppe/Bresaola-by-Bernina-of-Uruguay.asp

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for your help, however making the Bundnerfleisch from Bresola is not an option.

Also, I found a site that sells it, but it's made in "New York City"   WDF???

post #5 of 9
Quote:

Thanks everyone for your help, however making the Bundnerfleisch from Bresola is not an option.

Also, I found a site that sells it, but it's made in "New York City" WDF???

Hey @Chefross , guess i'm everyone, lol. Sorry for any confusion, did not mean to infer that you can make Bundberfleisch from Bresola, they are from the same region are pretty much the same thing except for some spices and the fact that some and not all of the Bundnerfleisch recipes I've seen/have call for it to be pressed into an oblong not round shape.

 

 

Glad you found it, check out igourmet think I saw it there as well (no afilliation ftr)

 

Cheers!

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 

Thanks everyone for your help, however making the Bundnerfleisch from Bresola is not an option.

Also, I found a site that sells it, but it's made in "New York City"   WDF???


Hi everyone,

 

sorry if I'm hijacking, but this brief discussion has piqued my interest with respect to the as-yet unsigned TTIP agreement between the EU and the US. The European food industry fears, not without reason, that established protected designations of origin might get blurred, if not rendered completely obsolete. Especially artisan producers here in Europe fear that we will see US-made imports of Schwarzwälder Schinken (Black Forest bacon), Bündnerfleisch, feta cheese, Parma prosciutto, kölsch beer etc., all protected designations of origin. In many cases, these same names seem to be widely used in the States to simply designate a type of product or preparation, produced in the US or, even worse, "assembled" in the US from ingredients sourced from around the world.

 

I personally think such protected designations are a good thing, a manifestation of regional food culture and tradition. I was wondering what you guys think - do you care if your Bündnerfleisch is made in Switzerland or Colorado? Do you care if your fiore sardo is made the traditional way by Sardinian dairy farms or Pennsylvanian producers?

 

I'd say that the vast majority of dedicated European chefs would more than cringe at an influx of fake traditional products and most likely boycott them.

 

Are there any US-made products with protected designations of origin?

 

Cheers,

Recky

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recky View Post
 


Hi everyone,

 

sorry if I'm hijacking, but this brief discussion has piqued my interest with respect to the as-yet unsigned TTIP agreement between the EU and the US. The European food industry fears, not without reason, that established protected designations of origin might get blurred, if not rendered completely obsolete. Especially artisan producers here in Europe fear that we will see US-made imports of Schwarzwälder Schinken (Black Forest bacon), Bündnerfleisch, feta cheese, Parma prosciutto, kölsch beer etc., all protected designations of origin. In many cases, these same names seem to be widely used in the States to simply designate a type of product or preparation, produced in the US or, even worse, "assembled" in the US from ingredients sourced from around the world.

 

I personally think such protected designations are a good thing, a manifestation of regional food culture and tradition. I was wondering what you guys think - do you care if your Bündnerfleisch is made in Switzerland or Colorado? Do you care if your fiore sardo is made the traditional way by Sardinian dairy farms or Pennsylvanian producers?

 

I'd say that the vast majority of dedicated European chefs would more than cringe at an influx of fake traditional products and most likely boycott them.

 

Are there any US-made products with protected designations of origin?

 

Cheers,

Recky

The only product that comes to mind is bourbon. For me personally its all about flavor. I can understand people getting angry about name theft though.

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

Recky....I hear ya.

 

There are still some people in the world who demand the REAL thing.

 

Prosciutto MUST be from Parma, Truffles from France, and Feta Cheese from Greece by way of Gibraltar. 

 

The USA labels many things made here with names of foreign products.

Champagne comes to mind firstly. We still call it that even though it is sparkling wine here.

 

But back to the original situation here, I did find the exact product on Amazon.com, but they were out of stock and will send me an email when it is available.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 

 

But back to the original situation here, I did find the exact product on Amazon.com, but they were out of stock and will send me an email when it is available.

I have been known myself to buy stuff on Amazon and Ebay that wasn't readily available from the brick-and-mortar suppliers. It's a funny old world these days.

 

Having said that, it's one of my favourite challenges to find regional artisan substitutions for ingredients called for in classic recipes and making such recipes my own. This often leads to surprisingly good results. For example, I love Tuscan ribollita. Here in Germany you can't get cavolo nero (black kale), but green kale is a traditional winter vegetable in this country. Different texture and flavour, much longer braising times, but I adapt the classic recipe to accommodate the differences. That's what I really love about my job...

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