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Chinese Orange Chicken

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

  Does anyone have any suggestions of how to make this dish to have more of an orange flavor?

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Grill Cook with a passion for creating new dishes
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post #2 of 25

Just a suggestion, but you'd probably have better luck with this in the Recipes section - http://www.cheftalk.com/f/11/recipes or even the general Food & Cooking section.  The only folks that'll see it here are those looking for reviews of cooking equipment.

post #3 of 25

What is your recipe like now? 

 

You need to add something with stronger orange flavor, that usually means zest. Dried Tangerines are also an option and a good traditional chinese ingredient in their own right. 

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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 25

Frozen Orange Juice Concentrate UNDELUTED will give you the strongest flavor:chef:

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Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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post #5 of 25

OJ Concentrate is good, but I find it harder to balance flavors with it. It comes with a lot of sugar you have to deal with in the dish. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 25

Use yuzu oranges.

 

dcarch

post #7 of 25

I sometimes add orange oil to OJ  concentrate

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 25
I see a couple of good options here.
Have never used the dried tangerine but since citrus zest is a common ingredient in baked goods I assume the whole fruit would add a great deal of flavor without having to compensate for the added sweetness a concentrated juice would bring to the table.

Flavored oils (LorAnn is my go to brand) have become very popular since coming on the market.
Hyper-concentrated so you only need a few drops.
Just pure flavor with no aftertaste no one need know it is even there if you choose not to mention it.

mimi
post #9 of 25

I was going to start a new thread but found this old one. I am thinking about how to duplicate something I just tasted at a Hunan restaurant in the sticks (Lapine, Oregon).

 

My daughter's favorite food is orange chicken. A few days ago she ordered it at a restaurant we went to for the first time, and it's her favorite version, and not like any other she or I have had.

 

My first impression was skewered and grilled pieces of chicken thigh in a sauce made of marmalade and soy sauce. I'm pretty sure the restaurant doesn't use marmalade, but who knows... it just tasted like it to me. There were little slightly crunchy slivers of orange zest (or other citrus zest) on it and I also tasted ginger. So I'm thinking the ingredients are skewered chicken, soy sauce, fried orange zest (???), fresh ginger and a lot of sugar. The sauce was very umami and dark brown, and almost syrupy. It was too sweet for me, but I would love to be able to make this for my daughter some time.

 

Any ideas on what the recipe might be? I'm thinking there might be a fairly standard recipe out there. I would ask the restaurant but they're 150 miles away and the server was not very nice.


Edited by OregonYeti - 5/19/16 at 5:20pm
post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

I don't know how you feel about having orange liqueur around but from what I understand, a little of this adds a lot of flavor. Try adding a little heat as well, as long as your daughter likes the heat?

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Grill Cook with a passion for creating new dishes
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post #11 of 25

Marmalades are a great way to bring flavor to a dish (savory or sweet).

I use the orange variety in my Pork Rib glaze sometimes.

You do have to be careful re any other ingredients that have sugar in them (altho a bit of acid will usually balance it out should that happen).

 

mimi

post #12 of 25

I would poke around the web and look for authentic/from scratch recipes.

 

In the meantime, it's not authentic, but the flavors and method might give you some ideas. Maybe add some ginger or five spice powder Honey, soy sauce, oj, and ginger might work. Taste as you go.

 

http://www.craftymorning.com/3-ingredient-orange-chicken-sauce-recipe/

 


Edited by Cerise - 5/20/16 at 6:27am
post #13 of 25

When making the sauce fry the orange zest to start the sauce. If you want some heat in the sauce fry some pepper flakes along with the orange zest. The sauce shouldn't take long to make and can be made while the chicken is frying. Watch the zest doesn't burn when frying it doesn't take long. This is probably the bits you taste in the sauce. 

post #14 of 25

I use fresh squeezed orange juice in the sauce, and along the line Billy suggests I saute the orange zest, adding it to the garlic, ginger, and peppers after they have sauted for a couple moments, and then toss with the deep fried chicken pieces.   

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If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
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post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
 

I would poke around the web and look for authentic/from scratch recipes.

 

This is my first place to ask when I've looked and haven't found it. :)

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post
 

When making the sauce fry the orange zest to start the sauce. If you want some heat in the sauce fry some pepper flakes along with the orange zest. The sauce shouldn't take long to make and can be made while the chicken is frying. Watch the zest doesn't burn when frying it doesn't take long. This is probably the bits you taste in the sauce. 


Thanks!

post #17 of 25

I add some whisk together chicken broth, orange juice, sugar, vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, orange zest, Sriracha, ginger and white pepper in a large bowl, to make the marinade. It goes delicious. 

post #18 of 25

I cheat with my Orange Chicken. It's a pretty simple recipe. Equal parts Orange Marmalade and Thai Sweet Chili Sauce thrown in a blender. You can adjust each up or down to your heat preference. 

post #19 of 25
I've worked in two(2) Asian places. Both used the same mix, done in the pan. Marmalade, soy (easy splash), rice-wine vinegar (easy splash), chx stock (for viscosity) and OJ (just another splash). The chx was cooked in the wok for a minute in oil with a few drops of sesame oil, then everything was put in 1x1 and it was cooked down for another two(2) minutes. Asian restaurants use jet-engine stoves, so you probably aren't going to cook as fast. The chx was heavily dusted/dredged with a mix of baking powder and rice flour.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #20 of 25
Thread Starter 

Sounds good iceman, I will definitely try this!

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Grill Cook with a passion for creating new dishes
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post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 

Good idea!

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Grill Cook with a passion for creating new dishes
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post #22 of 25

5 medium boneless skinless thighs, cut into pieces. Fry with 1 T of oil or less, uncovered.Stir occasionally and fry 'til browned, about 25-30 minutes, but go by appearance and not time. I took the time to take the skin off and cut the meat off the bone, but you don't have to.

Sauce: mix 6 T marmalade, 1/4 c. soy sauce and 1/2 cup sugar. Warm this in the microwave.

When the chicken is done, take the pieces out of the pan (and leave the oil in the pan, do not use), and mix chicken with the sauce mixture.

 

My recipe now.

post #23 of 25
Quote:
The chx was heavily dusted/dredged with a mix of baking powder and rice flour.
I'm pretty sure that should have been corn starch. Sorry. LOL @ ME ... I could still be wrong.


Oregon ... are you sure you want to fry that for 25-30 minutes?

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #24 of 25

that is a LONG time to fry  I'd guess more like 2-3 minute flash fry and then stir fry in the sauce

post #25 of 25

Maybe I didn't fry it that long. I went by appearance, and they were pretty big pieces. Millions, of course you could make it as you want, but I wanted to separate the meat from the fat in the pan, to make it a leaner dish.

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