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What do quality pizzerias do to their sauce that home cooks don't? - Page 3

post #61 of 74
I found store bought boxed pizza improves when you pour some olive oil over it before cooking, seams they leave that out even costco. Question is spaghetti or pizza sauce what's the difference? I used to make spaghetti sauce using a can of hunts tomato sauce, 6 gallon cost $2.95 at costco then added my own touch like olive oil, onion, garlic, herbs, canned diced tomatoes and cheese. Put a block of chop meat in and let simmer for few hours. I would remove the chop meat then fill six 32 oz. Glade containers for the freezer. Rember when a bottle of sauce was 2 lbs.
post #62 of 74

Pizza sauce is fresh whereas spaghetti sauce is cooked.  Pizza sauce tends to have sugar in it some places.

post #63 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

Pizza sauce is fresh whereas spaghetti sauce is cooked.  Pizza sauce tends to have sugar in it some places.


Most pizza sauces are used with tomatoes that have already been through a cooking process, or are premade sauces that have also been through a cooking process. 

post #64 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 


Most pizza sauces are used with tomatoes that have already been through a cooking process, or are premade sauces that have also been through a cooking process. 

 

Yes tomatoes get "cooked" to some degree during the canning process, but that's different than spaghetti sauce that has been cooked before canning.  When we made pizza sauce back in the day it was canned tomato puree, granulated garlic, onion powder, oregano, sugar and salt to taste depending on the brand of tomato puree.  We made 3-4 gallons at a time depending on what day of the week it was.  We also made spaghetti sauce from almost the same recipe, but we cooked it and I think we added tomato paste as well and backed off on the sugar - this was 40 some years ago so I'm fuzzy on the exact mumbers.

post #65 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiemu View Post
 

I've tried a few different tomato sauce recipes from pizza books aimed at home cooks and they're okay, but never as special as a good pizzeria.

Not sure what you mean by "Pizzeria." There are chains, & Mom & Pop/independent establishments throughout the US etc. I don't think it's just about the sauce - but a combo of factors, i.e. using a pizza oven, the freshest ingredients (in season tomatoes or san marrzano), fresh herbs, and a good dough recipe. I grew up & ate Pizza in NYC, and mostly it was oily/greasy -- probably from the cheese.  No simple answer here. Perhaps someone who owns a Pizzaria will weigh in as to their methods

post #66 of 74

At home you can get the cheese and you can get the sauce and with some experience you may have the proper dough. What you don't get is the 450°C wood oven to cook a pizza in 5 minutes or less.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #67 of 74

As I recall there are still 2 pizza places in New York using coal fired ovens. Would love to try a slice or two there.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #68 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

As I recall there are still 2 pizza places in New York using coal fired ovens. Would love to try a slice or two there.

 

mjb.

 

The relatively teensy town of Providence RI has 2 coal fired pizza places.  I tried the ritzier one, $20 for what was actually a very skimpy large pizza good for one person, and rather bland in all respects. Nothing much coming from the crust, and there wasn't much sauce or cheese to taste.

 

At an upscale place they thru a commemorative for an associate of mine, now the pizza they served as h'orderve was something.  I believe the sauce was made with sun-dried tomato.  Try that one why don't ya.

 

 

Rick

post #69 of 74

Wood fired pizza has gotten really trendy and none of the places are that great.  They have great restaurants, but they should serve decent food.  Their pizza has been unimpressive, and not just because we have a lot of good NYC influence here.  Some of them don't even use good ingredients, like preshredded mozz that is way too salty, or bland sauce. 

 

I worked for a great coffee shop that had better pizza, cooked in a stone oven from Italy, and they did a sundried tomato pestoish sauce that was really good. 

 

There is a place like 10 miles from my hometown that does the coal fired pizza, and I've heard great things about it.  It's the only place to last more than 2 years in that spot, so I may just check it out one of these days.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

At home you can get the cheese and you can get the sauce and with some experience you may have the proper dough. What you don't get is the 450°C wood oven to cook a pizza in 5 minutes or less.

 

Get a baking stone.  My oven at home goes up to only 500F, but with a really legit stone my thin pizzas cook really fast! 

post #70 of 74

We live 20 minutes from anything in the desert, naturally we make it all and cook pizza on my Blackstone it's awesome. I love it

 

http://www.blackstoneproducts.com/videos/pizzaoven.html

post #71 of 74

Was it worth $400? Ever cook fish or other things in it?

post #72 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

Was it worth $400? Ever cook fish or other things in it?

I paid around $300 for mine. And it's great for pizza. I hear a number of people rave that they cook steak at high sear temps on cast iron grill and it comes out fantastic. I cook all my steaks over mesquite fire so don't know if I want to try. I use the teflon grill pads on my gas grill for fish and grilled veggies.

post #73 of 74
Thread Starter 
It's been a long time since my original post but this is what I've learned in that time:

- fresh tomatoes make a nice sauce when roughly blended with garlic, fresh whole basil, fresh oregano, olive oil and salt and pepper. I let the sauce rest a few hours at room temperature, which improves the intensity of flavour.

- a thin base tastes better for home cooking. I always was using a thick base until recently. Thin base bakes better and let's the sauce shine better.

- a regular rectangular pan works well. A hot oven is more important than a pizza stone.

Having researched the pizza sites recommended on this thread, I think it'll be impossible to make a Neapolitan pizza without a very hot wood fired oven and San marzano tomatoes. But a satisfactory home pizza can be made nonetheless using simple ingredients and methods.
post #74 of 74
@tiemu I don't think I get fresh tomatoes good enough, long enough, to do pizza with. After reading this thread I'm gonna stop cooking my canned ones, though
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