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Brisket as the component in Ground Beef for Hamburgers, etc. - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Thread Starter 

So many suggestions here.  A lot to try in the future.  Glad today is Monday and I can begin to look for a butcher shop.  

post #32 of 44

@MillionsKnives , try putting your meat grinder attachment in the freezer and par freezing the meat, also process as fast as possible.

 

Cheers!

 

EDG

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post #33 of 44

Thanks @EverydayGourmet I did all that and was still never satisfied with the texture from the kitchenaid.   It's a great idea that probably works on a Hobart, but I just don't think it scales down on these lower horsepowered home versions.  I have a real meat grinder and double cleavers now, so the kitchen aid attachment is never used.

post #34 of 44

@MillionsKnives , huh, bought a Wolfgang Puck for home as the price was something I just couldn't pass up and the grinder works fine. In fact ground over 40 lbs of turkey in a day using it, worked just fine. The KA is @ least = 2 probably much better, check with the manufacturer, maybe you got a bad one.

 

 

Best,

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

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post #35 of 44

Never used my KA for grinding burger meat, but have made plenty of sausage using it and, for the most part, it worked fine.  Definitely need to partially freeze and cut meat into small chunks or you end up with an emulsified product.  It takes a little more time and care to work with it, as compared to a dedicated meat grinder, but unless you want another piece of kitchen equipment (I'd love one but don't really have the room for it and wife would probably not be happy with the expenditure) a KA can turn out a good, if not great product.

post #36 of 44

For reference, this is the kitchenaid grinder blade...   It is not sharp compared to real meat grinder blades.  It gets clogged on sinew gristle etc very easily (although I trim as much as possible) and you have to stop and clean all the time.   Even part frozen meat has problems in this grinder.  It flat out stinks.  Other than horsepower this is a major design flaw.

 

This is what a real meat grinder blade looks like:

 


As you place it flat on the plate and it spins, it actually cuts meat instead of pushing it through. 

post #37 of 44

I have a Kitchener grinder that is very good for home use.  Three plates large, medium and fine.  I like medium for ground meat and my favorite burger blend is chuck and trimmings from tenderloin.  Now - last year I bought corned beef briskets after St. Patty's Day when they were 1/2 off and socked them in the freezer.  Last summer I took out a 3# CB brisket and a 3# Chuck roast and ground them together.  I drained the CB as best as I could after soaking in four water changes overnight.  I had to put the griddle on the grill as the patties were very loose, but they firmed up when cooked.  The flavor was amazing and I still get requests for this blend.  

 

post #38 of 44

MK, I'm not saying that KA's are the best thing, for grinding, sinced sliced bread, but if that is what you have you can get a decent grind by following the guidelines I went through.  Sure, I would love to have a dedicated grinder, but I don't see that happening in the near future and there are many other people that don't want to invest in something that won't see a lot of use.  Sometimes it is a matter of using what you have and making it work.  And yes, prepping for grinding using a KA takes a little more as I try to remove as much silverskin and sinew as possible, but again, I have gotten really good results with my KA.

post #39 of 44

I've also had reasonable success with the KitchenAid attachment, but also have to admit that it loves to get jammed up on sinew.  Makes prepping the meat a bit more intensive exercise... but it's not a real inconvenience for use at home.

 

Has anyone ever tried sharpening the stock blade, or using one of the aftermarket blades?

post #40 of 44

Gotta work with what you have, I guess.  Good chefs find a way to get it done.   On Top Chef this season they had a sausage making challenge and they all used kitchenaids.  Of course only two people actually had time to case their sausages...    I could teach those young whippersnappers a thing or two about sausage making.

post #41 of 44
post #42 of 44

I use the kitchenaid attachment grinder too but I trim the sinew before I run it.

post #43 of 44

@MillionsKnives, this is exactly what the WP blade looks like

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #44 of 44

Getting the silver skin and any tendon material off is essential to a quality grind.  It will clog your plates and if you do manage to get it through will leave tough spots in the grind.  Lets face it - we're not braising burgers low and slow.

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