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Fun Question about Specific Knife Styling and Origin if there is one

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I've been going through pages and pages of this forum researching and finding lots of valuable information and learning.  Big Thank You to all that contribute!

 

 

Following up on advice and suggestions I have found a certain type of knife that I really appreciate the whole vibe of.  

 

The hammered damascus steel blade with dark wood handle with an overall leaf like shape usually found in ornate fashion that kind of avoids sticking to geographical or temporal regions too specifically - that is to say it is supremely classic and tasty to me.  They seem like they usually have a slightly lower point and slightly curved handle.

 

Was just curious if any of you all had any makers that have a line that exemplifies that description.  I'm sure its custom and pricey but probably also comes with no regrets :)  looks like they could be found in treasure tombs

 

 

Being new to this whole thing I thought these type of knives might have a specific history or manufacturers that I could look into for enjoyment and acquisition.  Something to drool over for a moment or two I suppose

 

I've seen HHH, while cool seem a little busy.  I like the level Jay Fisher seems to operate at but nothing jumped out at me there particularly.  Bob Kramer looks like he could do some great custom work but you have to enter a lottery for a chance to order one lol.  Saji Specials and the "new design" at japanese chefs knives are also something to behold and kind of close to what I was thinking.  Seems like if I find one with the right geometrical styling it isn't hammered or have the right details, if I get that its a straight flat japanese.  Maybe a fusion that looks like it could be in a museum?

 


Edited by Carmelo S - 1/23/15 at 8:51pm
post #2 of 22

No earthly idea what you're talking about with leaf shaped.  What do you think about this profile

 

http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives-14/kitchen-knives/gonbei/hammered-damascus-series/gonbei-240mm-hammered-damascus-wa-gyuto.html

 

Do you like more flat? More curve/belly?

post #3 of 22

Either a picture or a link (such as to an eBay item page) would help considerably.

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

Oh ok, like some japanese knives from the base of the handle to the tip are mostly just a hard straight line with no curve to it.  Some of  the custom knife makers that I've looked at or come across since my first post have nice line to it (like from the point over the top to the base of the handle).  Let me see if I can get a picture

 

And the belly on that one looks about right.  I do like the plain, to pattern, to hammered texture a lot on the blade.  I would be super interested in that knife with a custom handle and a bit of shape/curve to the top of it as opposed to flat almost from the butte to the tip.  Not like super western handle but just a little downturn at the end and some dark brown wood.

 

Maybe another shape the leaf like lines I'm thinking of might resemble would be like a spear tip type shape.

 

Wouldn't let me do individual but the ST1 and the ST3 on this page have kind of that thing going on, although they aren't hammered.  Were they a little bit more special and hammered that would pretty much be the ticket.  http://japanesechefsknife.com/SajiVG10CustomDamascusII.html#Saji%20VG-10%20Custom%20Damascus%20II

 

In the following link : the santoku SS-2 Is really something, if it were also hammered and with a more preferable handle

 

And then the Saji Specials http://japanesechefsknife.com/SajiSpecials.html#SajiSpecials are really inspiring

 

 

This has a decent profile and has a bit of that curve on the top http://thechoppingblockco.co.uk/products/saji-r2-ironwood-210mm-gyuto


Edited by Carmelo S - 1/19/15 at 1:34pm
post #5 of 22

Well you can get any handle you want if you are willing to pay and wait for it.   FWIW the JKI ichii octagonal handle is one of the most comfortable no nonsense handles.  I think it's better than most ho wood stock handles.

post #6 of 22

Hello Carmelo, more to add to the fun than a practical suggestion; you might be a future client of Nesmuk, a lot of curve made in Germany!

Top quality!

http://nesmuk.de/en/home/?preview=true

 

 

 

 

Or one of my all-time favorites, also subject to straight rejection from any self-installed knife guru, all of them probably using one or more of the Nenox guru stereotypes like; much too expensive, unknown metal, Hattori FH's are modelled after them... etc.

 

Nenox with quince handle, such sublime beauties! 

 

 

But, practically, I think you're looking for this kind?

http://www.hocho-knife.com/ryusen/


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 1/21/15 at 4:01am
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yeah it looks like on that website the sakai and ryusen are closest to what I was thinking of style wise but not quite as ceremonial or ornate looking.  Those German knives are really nice (I can see those German style lines) but not quite what I was thinking of in regards to the stylistic inquisition

post #8 of 22

Carmelo, do us a favor and make a rough sketch on paper, take a picture of it and post it. It will be much easier to get your idea across. It doesn't have to be an exact drawing.

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 

I tried to add the tiff file because there wasn't as much glare from the scanner on that type and was very clear but would only let me upload a JPEG

 

post #10 of 22
What kind of use do you have in mind for such a profile? Are you sure this can be of any use in the kitchen?
post #11 of 22

Exactly what i was going to say.

I do not know much about field knives, but looks as a bushcraft.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #12 of 22
post #13 of 22

Nice work, Carmelo! Very... Indonesian if you ask me.

Have a sniff around here; http://www.indonesianknives.com/

post #14 of 22
If the OP is looking for a strongly curved blade

http://www.knivesandtools.nl/nl/pt/-robert-herder-yatagan-universeelmes-1809-600-02.htm

This one at least has no huge fingerguard -- or whatever the proper term is with combat knives. Very practical in a home kitchen with small quantities of produce. The curve allows great pulling besides forward slicing.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 

I was thinking kind of like a Santoku, I do a lot of vegetables.  I wasn't sure if it could be used or not, I've seen some of them before somewhere just didn't remember where.  Kitchen knives always look so wonderful but straight to me, thought it would be nice to find a more decorated one for home use.  I was curious if the style fit a region.

 

It's possible when looking around the site and navigating links etc that I might have seen a really refined outdoor knife mixed in with kitchen knives and liked the look of it and stuck in my subconscious.  Thought I might be able to just get it custom built loosely based on the sketch

post #16 of 22
you might find that edge is highly impractical for cutting anything in the kitchen! Straight edges are a product of function, not a preference for form!
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpoiledBroth View Post

you might find that edge is highly impractical for cutting anything in the kitchen! Straight edges are a product of function, not a preference for form!


 +1

 

Unfortunately, what you have drawn is not something particularly suited for cutting vegetables, but is essentially an Asian style butcher's knifes.  I would enjoy cutting steak with it, even though it would not be my preferred profile.  I have an 8" Randall Bowie I used to practice knife fighting with.  I occasionally contemplate putting it to service as a steak knife, but haven't done so just yet.

 

 

Rick

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmelo S View Post
 

...

It's possible when looking around the site and navigating links etc that I might have seen a really refined outdoor knife mixed in with kitchen knives and liked the look of it and stuck in my subconscious.  Thought I might be able to just get it custom built loosely based on the sketch

 

When you have a design in mind, don't be surprised there's already a lookalike on the internet. But don't let it stop you from trying to design your own knife, practical or ornamental. Knife makers will accept your sketch to make the knife of your dreams.

However, indeed, designing kitchen objects is often working your way around limitations, like the given fact that some kitchen knives need to have a specific curve to their cutting edge etc.

 

Look what a beauty I found on the internet. If you like this style, search for "kukri" knives;

 

post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yeah I have a Kukri from when I did the filipino eskrima/silat  ... far from purposed for kitchen use haha.  They do look cool though.  I was wanting something that roughly looked like that but was actual kitchen use.

 

What are some custom knife makers that can do that japanese type stuff with style in the US? or North America... Some of the stuff like HHH is a bit too busy or modern

post #20 of 22

There are over 150 ABS certified Masters, and hundreds more who do nice work.  But this guy may be your man.

http://www.doorcountyforgeworks.com/Welcome.html

 

Too bad he hasn't got a gallery up on his site.  He works in real "Wootz" Damascus, as well as the layered stuff (which is called Damascus, but really isn't).

 

Wootz is the first crucible grade steel, originated in Asia, dates back to the crusades, and maybe earlier.  The Japanese folded stuff used by early Samuri was not as good, and the Japanese eventually imported the material.  Carbide formation is such that a condition of "banding" can be produced to create intricate patterns, much like folded steels.

 

Superior steel didn't appear until the 1700's, and its development was actually spured by clock makers who needed it for better springs and slicker gear shafts.

 

 

Rick

post #21 of 22

I'm an European, but I do know these guys from the US and Canada would be amongst your best choice;

 

http://www.tsourkanknives.com/

http://www.harnerknives.com/

http://www.rodrigueknives.com

 

 

There's really no end to what you can have made. In Europe, more exactly east-Europe, there's dozens of artisan knife makers.

Something totally over the top showpieces like this are made by;

http://www.arpadbojtos.sk/knives.html

 

 

Maybe these east-Europeans make more practical ones;

http://www.dohnalknives.com/strana01%20en.htm

 

 

http://www.mirohasoknife.com/historia/photogallerycbm_373755/100/

post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

Wow fantastic links, thank you very much for that.  Those knives are spectacular

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