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Pressure cooker question

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yesterday I cooked a pickled ox tongue in the pressure cooker trying to recreate the beautiful tender cold meat that my mother used to make unfortunately the meat came out very tough.

 

I cooked it for 25 minuets from when the steam started coming out of the cooker. Would increasing the cook time make the meat more tender?

post #2 of 13

@crankcasy, firstly welcome to CT!, secondly did you peal the tongue after you cooked it?

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yes and pressed it for 12hrs in the fridge.

post #4 of 13

That's pretty short for cooking a whole tongue. Probably twice that long would have been on the border of being tough still. An hour, probably about right, depends on how big the tongue was. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 13

I'm usually 25-45  minutes depending on the size of the product, don't PC tongue much so at somewhat of a loss as to "why".

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #6 of 13

It's the same reason as for any tough cut. It has to hit about 185 internal temperature to become tender. Usually simmering for a couple of hours. A pressure cooker will usually cut cooking time a little more than half but it's only a guideline, not universally so. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 13


Phatch  is correct you did not cook long enough let it cool in same water you cooked it in to retain juiciness(like corned beef)

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 13

BTW: a friend recently made beef tongue with a capers sauce and it was fantastic. The sauce was basically a velouté using the tongue's stock, with some capers added, part mashed part whole. That and boiled potatos. The tongue was fork tender, an amazing texture.

 

Edit to correct spelling. Capers, Ordo, not cappers.


Edited by Ordo - 1/24/15 at 6:37am
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #9 of 13

@crankcasy here in Belgium, ox tongue was a traditional dish on many festive occasions. It is a warm dish, served with Madeira sauce and potato croquettes that are made the day before. Nowadays this dish has almost disappeared but it is still sold in delicatessen butcheries as a ready to heat and eat dish.

Most butcheries also sell the (cold) charcuterie type of ox tongue like you intend to make. I found this picture on the web that really shows the "ox tongue in Madeira sauce" as I remember this delicious dish from my youth;

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 100

 

I had to search a bit further and discovered that still many Flemish foodies make and eat this dish. The name "ox" tongue is a bit stretchable nowadays. In older times, people used those very large ox tongues to feed a bunch of people at a feast table. Nowadays beef and veal tongues are used, all having a different cooking time of course. Let's say that as an average a beef tongue has a cooking time in a traditional pot, of 2,5-4 hours. An average of 3 hours is standard, but the test criterium is always how easily the skin peels off! If the skin doesn't come off easily, the tongue is not done yet, simple as that, but maybe a bit hard to check when it's in a pressure cooker :rolleyes:.

When using a very small (!) veal tongue, a cooking time of 45 minutes is possible, again tested by trying to remove the skin.

 

I have to add that raw tongue is first soaked in salted cold water for 3 hours to remove blood etc.

Secondly, you always bring the tongue to a boil for a few minutes in water only, then remove the dirty cooking water and wash the tongue by rubbing it with your hands under running cold water.

After this procedure, you cook the tongue starting over again with cold water and adding aromats (bouquet marmite).

 

I also found out that the average cooking time for a larger beef tongue in a pressure cooker is 75-100 minutes.

 

To make ox tongue in Madeira sauce, you use the bouillon that is a result of cooking the tongue.

Basically it's a velouté sauce on roux base; make a roux, add bouillon, tomato paste, seasoning, mushrooms and at the very end a small glass of Madeira wine (it has to be genuine Madeira, no junk!). Cut the tongue in thin slices and serve covered with the sauce generously over it, or, simply put the slices in the sauce first (which is done often) and serve on large platters.

Enjoy!


Edited by ChrisBelgium - 1/24/15 at 5:59am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

BTW: a friend recently made beef tongue with a cappers sauce and it was fantastic. The sauce was basically a velouté using the tongue's stock, with some cappers added, part mashed part whole. That and boiled potatos. The tongue was fork tender, an amazing texture.

 

You just posted this while I was still writing the next post, ordo. Your post made me remember another addition.

A variation on Madeira sauce is to leave the tomato paste out and add some finely cut sour (not sweet/sour) gurkins in the sauce, which added a delicious acidity to the sauce like capers do.

 

The same addition of gurkins was also done when using the classic Madeira sauce as I described in my previous post. I'm not exactly sure, but I think they called it "turtle sauce" when gurkins were added. 

post #11 of 13

Have to try that sauce Chris. In fact, i need to get back to velouté sauces.

About the tongue, my friend made two batches. The first one was delicious with just the right texture. The second was overcooked and as a result the fibers of the tongue broke appart. This is not the kind of cut that will get tough when overcooked.

Here's a tongue ragú with polenta:

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #12 of 13

Great idea to serve tongue with polenta! Thanks for that lovely suggestion, ordo!

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys took your advice and cooked for longer about 70 minuets turned out nice and tender although a little bland in the pickling but that comes down to how the butcher treats it not sure if I can change that.

 

Looking forward to some great sandwiches thanks to you guys. 

 

 

 

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