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Preparing for a storm

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
The northeast is bracing for a horrific blizzard tonight-tomorrow and I'm on my way to the grocery store along with the rest of NY. Which has me thinking, what are people buying and how do you prep for a storm? What do you want to eat when you are stuck inside for a few days and/or have to spend several hours plowing your house and car out of 3feet of snow? Sounds like an opportunity for yhr slow cooking challenge.

I'm thinking chuck, and some soup. Lots of nibbles too.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 16

Get stuff you don't have to cook too, in case you lose power.

post #3 of 16

Living in Canada, I've seen my fair share of storms and stay-ins...

Get canned foods, pastas, and meats which could easily be frozen.

 

Also, I would suggest getting a camping stove with a propane cylinder. They're normally pretty cheap and can get you out of a jam.

 

If your electricity is out, you might want to put all the meat from your freezer in a few heavy duty garbage bags, and put them outside in the cold.

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Oh thanks all, I think we're ok on the emergency preparations, I just wanted to see what others cook when they're snowed in.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 16

Lots of water, too! (Just in case your pipes freeze.) We ran out to the store yesterday and I made sure we didn't forget that. It's not supposed to be as crazy here in PA, but I hope you and your family are safe during and after this storm!

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtullius View Post
 

Get stuff you don't have to cook too, in case you lose power.

I agree, have foods that don't have to be cooked.  Or if you have a portable burner, you can have soup or a stew you have prepared.  But you would also lose refrigeration.  I would have nuts, dried and fresh fruits, some cheese, lots of water, homemade beef jerky (if I had the time).  I live in Florida, so we prepare for hurricanes where we plan on losing power.  Good luck!

post #7 of 16

We are thinking of you @Koukouvagia

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks @petalsandcoco we'll be ok!! It will be a major inconvenience more than anything.

Even in the morning the market was bedlam. There was little on the shelf so I got some cold cuts, a cabbage I'm going to stuff today and a small eye round I will most likely slow roast.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #9 of 16
Bread, eggs and milk seams all that is needed to survive any storm
post #10 of 16

I just go shop the pantry... with all the canned and frozen stuff cooking with no power is easy. Stove top still works(gas) so mashed potatoes and canned turkey or chicken and gravy, or a stew that simmers all day making the house smell good(make a clean out the fridge stew to use up the stuff that can go bad).

 

But having solar and a huge battery bank I just turn on the inverter and life goes on :D

post #11 of 16

How about activities for your little one?

If he's going to be cooped up for a long

period of time, it'll most likely safe your and

your husband's sanity :lol:

As to cooking, I like MaryB's idea of

clean out the `fridge kinda cookin'

`specially if you lose power.

You're a great cook Miss KK, I'm sure that

you will be able to feed your family

with what you have on hand.

The markets will probably be out of

their goods for a while too, so...

post #12 of 16
Tuna, I always buy tuna fish sold white when on sale.
post #13 of 16
Old school hand held can opener.
I bought a few for the end of the world In 2000.
Started using them and never went back to electric.
Way easier to sanitize than the bulky electric type and doesn't take up valuable counter space.

When someone new is in my kitchen helping and asks where my can opener is I open a drawer and whip one out.
Get some funny looks.
The Grands tell their friends and they think it is cool lol.


mimi
post #14 of 16


Let them out to shovel snow

Also have a couple of cans of sterno handy for cooking and some flashlight from the dollar store with xtra batteries

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #15 of 16

Looks like y'all dodged the bullet as we did.  I'm not complaining mind you . . . LOL

post #16 of 16

Cheap flashlights are not good... buy good ones and scatter tam around the house where people can grab one if power fails. I use Maglight AA cell flashlights and have a dozen of them around here. Make sure they are LED for long battery life! And a neat trick is buy those outdoor solar spotlights, put the solar panel outside and mount the light inside the house as an emergency backup light. They are motion sensing so come on when someone enters that room.

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