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Rabbit anatomy lesson, focus on removing silver skin, "visceral" fat

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hey, ChefTalk! Long time lurker, first time posting.  I acquired a beautiful rabbit to attempt a Fergus Henderson meat pie, but I'm worried my hamfisted and ignorant handling may abuse this wonderful animal.  I've removed the kidneys, heart and liver and am saving those for...well, something yet decided (please feel free to suggest something!).  I'm having trouble with removing the silver skin and am wondering if I'm cutting correctly.  It seems like there's a fair amount of fat around what I understand is called the saddle.  I'm removing a fair amount of stuff, not just the skin, but I'm wondering also if I've gotten it all.  I've tried to label this picture to visualize my dilemma.  What would you do?

 

1. I've been studiously removing the "B" layer, and think I need to go deeper.  Is "A" another layer of silver skin? Do I ultimately want to reach the "C" layer?

 

2. Also, in the rabbit cavity, i see lots of what looks like fat.  From my cursory internet research it sounds like this is not desirable and should be removed and discarded.  Is this true?

 

3. After I color this, we're to roast covered in chicken stock and red wine for a couple hours until the meat is tender.  I've not found many specific temperature recommendations, but was guestimating 325 would suffice.  What do you think?

 

Thank you in advance!

 

post #2 of 6

Welcome to Cheftalk.

 

You're on the right track.

You are correct in that you are working with the saddle.
"B" is edible too so don't throw it away.

I've always left it on when I removed the loins and used it to wrap around them for cooking.

"A" is the loin and has a small amount of silverskin to remove.

 

Also....if you are going to braise this for "a couple hours" in stock and wine, you will have mush when done.

Rabbit cooks like chicken....bout an hour.

325 is fine.

post #3 of 6

trim visible surface silver skin, ignore the rest. Same for fat, take off what is easy to get too. Don't sweat the small stuff and cook it and eat! I have skinned/gutted them and put them on a spit over a campfire without much other trimming and they turn out fine.

post #4 of 6

I just pull off what I can then section it - fore legs, hinds, saddle and ribs.  I like to brown it then slow cook it with rehydrated wild mushrooms, wine, shallot, garlic, thyme, etc.  

post #5 of 6

Not only does it taste like chicken, it also cooks like chicken. I like it cut up in 8 s then dredged in seasoned flour, then sautéed in a heavy pan over medium fire. served with a brown pan demi with boysenberries .

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 6

I am raising my own rabbits and slaughtering and butchering them myself. That small amount of silverskin is essentially inconsequential, to be honest. And, as @chefedb said, it cooks like chicken. 

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