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wild boar tartar

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have a "wild and raw" beer vs wine dinner coming up in 2 months. I was thinking of doing a wild boar tartar. My question is that possible to do, or do I have to worry about it because it is pork? I have heard of most of the most common types of tartar but I don't think I have ever heard of a wild boar.
post #2 of 12

I have never done tartar of wild boar or saw it on the menu anywhere. I think it being pork is a MAJOR issue! Venison makes a good tartar you should maybe try that instead.....

post #3 of 12

Normally no form of pork is served raw. Although unlikely there is still the chance of a form of food poisoning present(Triginossses) in particular to wild  home hunted products.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 12
Raw pork, fresh and unprocessed, wild or domestic, is a No-No!
Trichinosis is caused by eating raw or undercooked pork and wild game.
post #5 of 12

Just had this discussion at length and ad nauseam, long story short, "wild game" in a commercial restaurant?, cost you your license and/or @ least a heavy fine. All "game" served in a restaurant, in the US, must be farm raised. The USDA recommended safe IT's for pork and wild swine are different a higher temp for wild is strongly recommended. Would I even entertain serving wild boar tartar, NO!, but it's your bacon soes to speak.

 

 

Cheers!

 

 

EDG     

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply
post #6 of 12
Taking into consideration that the quality of wild game can vary widely IMO serving it raw would pose a huge risk.

Even venison has its problems with a disease that presents much like "mad cow" disease.
Yes... here in America.
Started somewhere in the mid northern states and has traveled as far south as Oklahoma the last I heard.

Obviously you should discard the carcass of any animal that looks or acts ill.
Still no guarantees......

mimi
post #7 of 12

@flipflopgirl you're recommending him to even consider serving wild game?, at a restaurant?

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

Reply
post #8 of 12
Heck no!
It was more of a reminder that in a lot of cases wild game is not even safe for home use much less in a restaurant setting.

We get tickets for "Wild Game Dinners" a couple of times a year.
More of a donation to the cause than an event we look forward to.

Give them away to one of the employees usually.

mimi
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by EverydayGourmet View Post
 

Just had this discussion at length and ad nauseam, long story short, "wild game" in a commercial restaurant?, cost you your license and/or @ least a heavy fine. All "game" served in a restaurant, in the US, must be farm raised. The USDA recommended safe IT's for pork and wild swine are different a higher temp for wild is strongly recommended. Would I even entertain serving wild boar tartar, NO!, but it's your bacon soes to speak.

 

 

Cheers!

 

 

EDG     

The wild part is a bit of a stretch. when you see wild boar on a menu generally its a pig that is of a heritage breed, bred on a farm and released onto a giant estate and is allowed to go feral. still fine by the USDA standards, and still sort of wild. 

post #10 of 12

I just served a wild boar and venison ragu for a party recently.  I bought 5lbs of wild boar shoulder from Dartagnan and it states it is sourced from feral swine in Texas and should be cooked accordingly.  I would be thinking trichinosis here.


Edited by Mike9 - 2/4/15 at 9:47am
post #11 of 12

To all younger Culinarians   ..  Raw Meat, Rare Turkey and Duck Breast etc.   Years ago many place served Tartare be it beef, lamb, veal .In many places it was done tableside <ground filet or sirloin, raw egg, capers chopped onion, fresh parsley , it was show biz.  Today its a different ballgame you can't serve a raw egg and using ground raw meat or rare poultry is a big problem. You will have major liabilities re food poisoning and assorted other problems. Processing today is different then years ago. We very rarely heard of someone sick from food poisoning and I believe it is due to plain old  greed. The processors put anything in what we eat to turn a larger profit and the government lets them . I once  visited a slaughter house and although I was used to butchering forequarters and hindquarters myself ,I looked in amazement as the cows carcass passed me by , there were about 15 guys assembly line style and each one made 1 cut. The place stunk and could have used a major cleaning. These guys  put their hands in their hair ,chewed gum and used the same knife to cut all the cows(If 1 is contaminated now they all would be.)

This was a supposedly government inspected plant?? I saw no inspectors or any type of supervision going on. Their are no more meat inspectors. The government only steps in after the problems happen .So  I sometime wonder  if what is hunted by local people is not safer then what we buy in the supermarket.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #12 of 12

try to do it with prosciutto !

 

smoked pork

mascarpone 

cipollotti

onions

 

salt & pepper 

 

gastronomie something else :P 

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