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The perfect burger? - Page 3

post #61 of 71

On the topic of a perfect burger...

 

One thing to always consider if you want to add a little spice and savory taste to any hamburger is to consider shipping in some New Mexican green chile peppers, roasted, skinned, and seeded.  Green chile can often be found frozen, but this little known ingredient is a great way to add to a portabella melt, maybe with the provolone cheese, or maybe diced and dashed within tomato slices.  You can even blend it in with a homemade mayonnaise.  It isn't a super spicy pepper (like Tai green peppers) but is more like a slightly warm spicy bell pepper.  

 

If anyone else in the forum knows about this ingredient, they will understand where I am coming from since it is truly a game changer for many recipes, especially hamburgers.  

 

Just something I thought you would find very interesting.  

 

 

Enjoy the very best, 

with regards...

 

-Gabe

post #62 of 71

The Perfect Burger

 

First, let me just say, the moment you start adding things to the meat, it's meatloaf not burgers. It may be shaped like a burger and cooked like a burger, but meatloaf it is.

 

Back to the burger - I grind my own meat with my specific grind ratio and grinding method. I make my buns from a recipe I developed over a 3 year period of testing and refining. I make the aioli, I make the pickles, I smoke the cheese, and I cure the bacon.

 

Every time I have put this burger on a menu I get the same response, "that is the best damn burger I've ever tasted." I got this response so many times that the last time I put it on a menu That's what I called it, "The Best Damn Burger There Is".

 

It truly is amazing how much work we can put into a burger that is typically considered fast food, as someone here astutely pointed out.

post #63 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefanthonyd View Post
 

my specific grind ratio and grinding method. 

Unless you'd rather keep it secret, would you share what ratio and method you're using? 

post #64 of 71

The 36 hour burger: 

 

 

post #65 of 71

What I use is chuck. I break the meat down and remove any silver skin and gristle. Next I separate the meat from the fat, then I weigh the meat and add enough extra beef fat (suet) to give me a ratio of 33%. That's not a typo, it is 2 parts meat to one part fat. (If you do this every one will tell you the fat ratio is too high. However, if you do this and don't tell them, they will tell you, that's the best burger I've....You get the idea.)

 

As far as grinding goes, all the rules apply, frozen grinder, frozen bowl, and partially frozen meat and fat, etc. Season the meat and fat with kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper. Grind it with a medium die and do one pass only. Submerge your hands in ice water and very gently mix the ground meat and fat. Put it back in the freezer to harden back up. Make the patties and be certain not to overwork the meat.

 

In a nutshell the whole grind process is about ensuring that you don't emulsify the fat. The same is true when you're making the patties. Keep your hands cold, and work the meat as little as possible.

 

Cook them on a flattop or cast iron skillet. That is how that beautiful crust forms on the burger. That crust is the reason I don't grill them. That and the fact that the meat is not packed firm enough to hold together on a grill.

 

I make the patties 200 grams, about 7 ounces. I sear them over high heat for 2 to 2-1/2 minutes per side. That gives you a perfect rare approaching medium-rare burger.

 

The size of the burger isn't arbitrary. At 200 grams the cooked burger will precisely fit my buns, edge to edge.

post #66 of 71

BTW - the order that you build your burger affects the taste. In other words there is a correct way to build a burger. From the bottom up it goes: bun, mayo, lettuce, tomato, burger, cheese, onion, bacon, mayo, top bun.

 

post #67 of 71

Sounds pretty good chefanthonyd!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #68 of 71
Thread Starter 

Lately my trend in burgers is simplify, much like my taste in pizza has changed.  Used to be I'd load them up with all sorts of stuff. Now I go for more minimalist, 2, 3, possibly 4 toppings. The burgers I recently made and posted in another thread with bacon and garlic ground into the meat were about as far as I would usually go in messing with the meat mixture. Once Karen commented on why grinding the meat rather than purchasing preground and I replied something like "I can better control the fat content." I just didn't tell her that I tend to control it more like @chefanthonyd does. She *loves* my burgers.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

Lately my trend in burgers is simplify, much like my taste in pizza has changed.  Used to be I'd load them up with all sorts of stuff. Now I go for more minimalist, 2, 3, possibly 4 toppings. The burgers I recently made and posted in another thread with bacon and garlic ground into the meat were about as far as I would usually go in messing with the meat mixture. Once Karen commented on why grinding the meat rather than purchasing preground and I replied something like "I can better control the fat content." I just didn't tell her that I tend to control it more like @chefanthonyd does. She *loves* my burgers.

 

mjb.


+1.  For me it's just good beef, cooked on very high heat, salt & pepper, served with minimal stuff.  I like the beef to shine through.

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #70 of 71

   Wonderful job, Ordo!  Absolutely stunning burgers!

 

 

 

   My perfect burger is no different than many here.  It starts with smartly grown grains high in nutrition coupled with adequate pastures and humane/stress free & proper slaughter practices.

 

   Oh, that and a little salt

 

 

 

Dan

post #71 of 71

Here's a double patty burger, with onions, tomato, fontina cheese and mayo.

 

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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