or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Ravioli and other stuffed pastas
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ravioli and other stuffed pastas

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Ok so my question to all of you I swhen making fresh pasta ravioli should you precook it first before service or do you know a way to stop it from sticking to everything when left wrapped in a fridge for a few hours

post #2 of 14

Never precook before service.

 

Hotel pan with semolina flour. Place the ravioli's on top of the flour, without touching each other and sprinkle a little more semolina on top of them all.

post #3 of 14


Nothing should be in the fridge unwrapped. We used to blanch first then a little oil in hotel pans. Not to much oil otherwise the pasta will repel the sauce. I prefer to cook to order ,but when you are doing 4 to 500 covers a night its almost impossible so we blanch first. The only pastas  we actually cook to order is linguini, or angel hair.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #4 of 14

Was that directed at my post? I didn't think it necessary to mention wrapping the hotel pan or using the plastic lids if it's in your lowboy for service, seemed obvious. I guess not.


Edited by veronporter - 2/3/15 at 4:48pm
post #5 of 14

Granted, I never worked in an "Italian" restaurant so we wouldn't sell tons of ravioli, but  we often served a ravioli appetitzer or it would accompany an entree.  After we made the ravioli we would freeze them in a single layer.  Once frozen we would pack them into bags for service.  At service time we'd just dump the frozen ravioli into our water.  Only took a minute or 2 longer to cook them directly from frozen than from thawed.  It was easy and you didn't have to worry about them clumping up.  We also had a freezer, not on the line, but very accessible so it didn't take much to step off quickly and grab them.

post #6 of 14

I always cook fresh pasta or ravioli to order.  Depending on how many you are making at a time, freezing may be a better option.  If you're making a large quanity, the filling may turn an unpleasant color if left in the cooler fo a few days uncooked.  I would choose freezing over precooking and then tossing in oil to hold in the cooler.

post #7 of 14

We use a a product from Joseph's Pasta (stocked by both US Foods and Sysco, and likely others) that's a fresh frozen par cooked pasta product. We buy both the linguini nests and the cheese ravioli. We don't sell tons of past so the convenience of frozen (that tastes like fresh ) and the fact it's par cooked. Ravs take only 3 mins, linguni only 2. It's a perfect product for us.

post #8 of 14

"fresh frozen"

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by veronporter View Post
 

"fresh frozen"


Do they really still use that phrase?

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by veronporter View Post
 

"fresh frozen"


Helpful post. Have you always been an a****** or did it just happen over time?

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CapeCodChef View Post
 


Helpful post. Have you always been an a****** or did it just happen over time?

 

Generally I'm a pretty nice guy. Though, I don't think that has anything to do with having a little laugh and pointing out a silly, loaded term on a message board.

 

It has nothing to do with you; I don't know why you're acting so offended. It's just a ridiculous misnomer. I'm pretty sure many here(and at least one for sure)would agree with that.

 

Happy cooking!

post #12 of 14

Vernonporter, while fresh, frozen is pretty much an oxymoron, in terms of pasta it refers to the fact that the pasta is "fresh" not dried pasta that has been frozen (although why  you would need that term as dried pasta doesn't need to be frozen is beyond me).

 

Let's please keep our conversations civil.  No need for personal attacks.  If you take issue with a post then please handle it appropriately.

post #13 of 14
I make a zillion or so raviolis at a time, all squished out by hand. After making 6-8, depending on the tray size, I dust them off in regular ap flour to dry up the outside, then lay them on the tray. They are all touching and overlapped. After an hour or so in the freezer they are solid frozen enough to take from the tray and fill up a freezer bag. I've never had any sticking problem. My ravioli go from freezer to boiling water. I boil them up per order. 8-minutes usually does the job. I don't like to boil up more than 8 in a pan at a time. They need a little room and I don't like them moving around too hard in the boiling water. Of course, as per usual, YMMV.
post #14 of 14
Same procedure as Ice man and works like a charm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › Ravioli and other stuffed pastas