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Stout Creme brulee

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Working on a stout Creme brulee and want to use raw stout to maintain the integrity of the flavor but it doesn't seem to be setting the way I would like. It's a bit loose but the flavor is spot on so I don't want to change much. Would simply adding more yolks solve the issue? Does anyone here have experience making brulee custard with raw alcohol in it?
post #2 of 9

Because of the extra liquid added, you need more "egg power" to set the custard. Adding a few extra yolks may help.....certainly won't hurt anything.

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
I actually didn't add more liquid rather I substitued some of the dairy for stout, so the volume of liquid was the same. Perhaps because the stout has less body than the cream it didn't set as well. Needless to say I went with 50% more eggs yolks and it set up fine. Still a little looser than our regular brulee is still may add on more yolk but all in all it turned out great. The chef loved it and we'll be running it for Valentine's Day. I appreciate the input.
post #4 of 9
post #5 of 9
Have you ever ordered a dish that is well known to your palate and been disappointed when it falls short of what you expected?
You (as well as your exec chef) are happy with this pudding like brûlée ?
You are going to serve it whether you can tighten it up or not?

I think we sometimes get an idea in our head and want it to work so badly that we lose touch with the big picture.
I watch a fair amt of Top Chef and have seen a fair amt of very talented chefs " pack their knifes and go" over something as simple as the wrong texture of a dish.
They comment on the way out that they knew it was not right but thought they would get a pass for being innovative.

It is ultimately your chef's decision what goes on the menu but if your dish comes back uneaten that is your name associated with it not his.

Just IMO.

mimi
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
As I said I'm going to up the egg count by 1. The texture is fine it is merely slightly looser than our traditional vanilla bean brulee. It is by no means a pudding. I am a perfectionist and it won't go out unless I'm completely satisfied. But I'm just satisfied that the issue was solved and I'm able to address it appropriately.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jalapano200 View Post

As I said I'm going to up the egg count by 1. The texture is fine it is merely slightly looser than our traditional vanilla bean brulee. It is by no means a pudding. I am a perfectionist and it won't go out unless I'm completely satisfied. But I'm just satisfied that the issue was solved and I'm able to address it appropriately.

Great.
As it should be.
After all this work I am craving brûlée .
smile.gifsmile.gif

mimi
Edited by flipflopgirl - 2/9/15 at 5:27am
post #8 of 9
Quote:
 I actually didn't add more liquid rather I substitued some of the dairy for stout, so the volume of liquid was the same. Perhaps because the stout has less body than the cream it didn't set as well. 

This assumption is correct. The fat in the cream adds a lot to the final body of the finished custard. In this case substituting stout for cream is not a direct substitution, so you have to add in the extra body where you can and you used extra yolks. 

post #9 of 9
2nd iceman
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