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steak sides? - Page 3

post #61 of 86
@wesgraham if your knife (or any other) skills are lacking why not try to practice a bit before jumping into the controlled chaos that can be culinary school?
Youtube can be a great resource .
Grab a potato and go for it!

mimi
post #62 of 86
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

@wesgraham if your knife (or any other) skills are lacking why not try to practice a bit before jumping into the controlled chaos that can be culinary school?
Youtube can be a great resource .
Grab a potato and go for it!

mimi

 

Thank you for the good advice. I've actually have been trying to self teach myself and have a friend who graduated from the same college I'm attending this fall teach me a few things.

post #63 of 86

I'll second the need for practicing on your own. Even with a culinary degree, you may not have had the chance to practice enough while in school so continuing to do so is necessary for everyone. The most important part is learning to hold the knife correctly. If you haven't been shown already, find someone to show you. If you already know it, you're halfway there. 

     Fortunately the best vegetables for practicing are relatively cheap and versatile. Carrots, celery and onions.  Buy a lot of each and start cutting. And potatoes of course. When you're done cutting, cook and eat your practice materials. 

      There are two guides that may help you. One is Mercer Rules, by the Mercer Knife company. I don't remember where I got mine but it's a large rectangular piece of steel with cutouts of the various classic cuts, a ruler on both long sides, cooking temps and a list of the five mother sauces  printed on the surface of one side and more info printed on the other. . It wasn't very expensive as I remember.

     The second is a "Classic Knife Cuts Visual Model Set IV." This is a 3D plastic modeling of each cut all attached to a plastic card and comes in a small plastic box Made by the ARD, Inc. So you can easily see what is meant by brunoise, Large dice, etc. 

If I can find a link I'll post it.    I find both helpful as a reminder as to how big each cut is supposed to be as I can't tell 3/8 in.  from 1/2 in.  just by eyesight. And they easily fit into a knife roll. 

Don't forget. Everyone isn't very good in the beginning. Just like playing a musical instrument. 

post #64 of 86

Smoked gouda grits!

post #65 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eatordie93 View Post

Smoked gouda grits!

?

mimi
post #66 of 86
I have never been a reader learner.
Need to hear it in a lecture or see an actual demo.
YouTube has been a great great resource for me since "retirement"
Always wanted my cross stitch and other needle work to be cleaner and have made great strides in this area.

I do have a point here lol.
There is a saying..... See one, Do one, Teach one.
Does not mean you can only see it once but by the time you get to teaching the skill is pretty much mastered.

Wishing you great success in cooking school.

mimi
post #67 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eatordie93 View Post
 

Smoked gouda grits!

Now you are just making me hungry.

post #68 of 86

Knife grip is an individual thing, what is comfortable for one may not be for another!

post #69 of 86

Chefs are better than I am.  I am a cook, not a Chef. But chefs have knife skills, they know the difference between marscapone, cream fresh and cottage cheese.   They have earned their tabs.  I respect them.  I am a cook, and I am a damned good one.  I am not a chef.

post #70 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
...The steak can be served w/ a pat of compound butter, or prepared au poivre style (perhaps haricots on the side)...

And/or Potatoes Dauphinoise (gratin, w/ or w/o cheese).

 

Example below. (You could rub a cut clove of garlic in/around the baking dish & use a mandoline or utensil of choice.)

 

Potatoes Baked in Milk & Cream:

 

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Gratin-Dauphinois

post #71 of 86


Hasselhof Potatoes make a nice side and test your knife skills at the same time Bob.
post #72 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post



Hasselhof Potatoes make a nice side and test your knife skills at the same time Bob.

I think you mean "hasselback" potatoes, chef :-)

post #73 of 86

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #74 of 86

post #75 of 86

I'd have to say oreda seasoned crinkles are perfect side for steak. Even though they aren't exactly from scratch, they do taste really good!

post #76 of 86
For a tube steak, perhaps.
post #77 of 86
Restaurants have menus because people like to make choices.


Extra Crispy Seasoned Crinkles
America’s favorite crinkle fry is even better with a spicy kick. You’ll love these seasoned fries with just about everything.
post #78 of 86

Asparagus.

Green onions.

Scalloped potatoes.

Wild rice with bacon.

French fries with gravy.

 

All easy to do and very tasty. In my opinion I try not to make the sides to a good steak dinner too extravagant because the focus should be on the steak. A nice prime rib cooked to perfection is about as good as it can get from the red meats section.

post #79 of 86

Gruyere-salted frites?

 

To make gruyere salt, preheat oven grill to the highest temperature possible.  You want that bad boy SUPER hot.  Line a baking tray with foil and evenly spread cheese on it.  Pop under the grill and watch it like a hawk, sit by your grill with some oven mitts in hand ready to go - you want to cheese to be crispy and golden in colour - a second more will result in burnt cheese, not tasty!  The SECOND it becomes golden in colour pull it out and set aside to cool.  Once cool, pour into a mini food processor and blitz to a fine crumb.  Mix with salt.  Serve steaks topped with frites and a generous sprinkle of gruyere salt.

post #80 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by letsforker View Post
 

Gruyere-salted frites?

 

To make gruyere salt, preheat oven grill to the highest temperature possible.  You want that bad boy SUPER hot.  Line a baking tray with foil and evenly spread cheese on it.  Pop under the grill and watch it like a hawk, sit by your grill with some oven mitts in hand ready to go - you want to cheese to be crispy and golden in colour - a second more will result in burnt cheese, not tasty!  The SECOND it becomes golden in colour pull it out and set aside to cool.  Once cool, pour into a mini food processor and blitz to a fine crumb.  Mix with salt.  Serve steaks topped with frites and a generous sprinkle of gruyere salt.


Tasty...

What happens if you store leftovers in fridge then bring back to room temp (any texture change?)

 

mimi

post #81 of 86


I'm assuming you mean the gruyere salt?  I didn't actually store it in the fridge, just left it at room temp in an airtight container :-)

post #82 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by letsforker View Post


I'm assuming you mean the gruyere salt?  I didn't actually store it in the fridge, just left it at room temp in an airtight container :-)

I was wondering about mold and bacteria overgrowth.
The cheese ya know?
I am on the mid Texas gulf coast and almost everything needs to be stored in the reefer (quality standpoint)....
Not plain salt of course but when this cheese powder is added the whole game is changed.

Another question before I head off to the cheese store.... does this procedure leave behind any oil?
Does it need to be drained before cooling or do you just toss it all in and go for it?

Thanks bunches for the recipe....

mimi
post #83 of 86

More steak of-freaking-course.

post #84 of 86

Potato Galette

 

The leftovers are like upgraded hash browns in the AM and even work well in breakfast tacos. 

 

BTW, this was my first post! 

post #85 of 86

 

One of my favorite sides with steak is sauted cauliflower a la Alice Waters.  Simple and very good in the steak drippings on the plate.

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mgm0 View Post
 

More steak of-freaking-course.

 

LOL I asked my son what he wanted for his birthday dinner, knowing full well the answer would be steak, so I asked about sides and he said "little pieces of steak".  I made it.  A little worcestershire, a little lime, yum.

If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
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If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
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post #86 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by wesgraham View Post

I was just told asparagus. What can i do with asparagus to make it not so plain? And http://www.melissas.com/Baby-Purple-Potatoes-p/221.htm puple mash potatoes? Shes obsessed and to wants those over regular rusetts
Asparagus is an excellent choice.

In order to spruce up, take thinly sliced porchetta and wrap the asparagus. Drizzle olive oil seasoned with pepper and paste garlic over them, and bake until porchetta crisps. Top the wrapped asparagus with a smoked Gouda bechamel mornay.

Have a box of tissue handy to soak up the tears/clean your underwear out.

I'd skip the purple potatoes, and go with Yukon gold. I'd serve them with grilled leeks.
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