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"Commercial" home stoves

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Been using a commercial style home stove for a short time now, and don't see the point.  They are more trouble than they are worth IMO.  

Any more than a 30% flame setting cooks the food too fast, give the pans an ugly blue tinge, and requires constant temperature adjustment.  Any small adjustment, to the control knob, causes a big change in flame height.

The over size burners give too much heat to the outside of the pan and not enough to the center, cooking food unevenly.  These burners, even at a lower setting, send flames up the side of my 14" wok and hardly touch the center of the pan, defeating the whole purpose of cooking with a wok.  

The only advantage I see, of this dragon of an appliance, is it heats up a large pot of water quickly.  I'm sure these appliances work well in a commercial setting, but I don't see the advantage of home use.  Maybe I just need to get used to the thing, but it looks to be a big learning curve.

post #2 of 19

Have you considered using commercial pots and pans on your commercial stove?

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

I've got some good, 20+ year old, All Clad Ltd. pots and pans, and some Mauviel and Lodge also.  The problem is, I mostly  cook for myself, so I use the smaller cookware, but even with the larger pans, the huge burners seem like overkill.  It's like having a car that can go 150mph, but having to drive in a 25mph zone.  The commercial cooking units don't really seem worth the additional money.

post #4 of 19


Some so called pro stoves are not they are just 6 burner home stoves with black iron or stainless steel trim, are heavy and you can stand on the doors when opened. Real commercial stoves require 1 flame adjustment maybe in a year. What brand do you have??

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

It's a Wolf: 5 large burners and one small burner in the back.  I'd use the small burner, all of the time, if it was easier to see the food cooking.  If I had my way, I would have 5 of the small burners and only one large one.  I like oven though.

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

I have a "commercial," 4 burner Viking, at the office.  Same issue, burners too large.  As with the Wolf, I have to operate it within the first 1/3 of the temperature control setting.

post #7 of 19

I would not buy a commercial style stove that had a ring burner. They need the star shaped burners for even heating. So what if a pan turns blue? Some of my stainless is discolored form use on high heat and it doesn't bother me in the least. I have one stainless pan I love for high heat steak searing, I get it to smoking hot, add a tiny bit of oil and in goes the steak, cook until the steak slides with a pan shake, flip, turn heat down and let it finish.

post #8 of 19

I have a south bend range that has round burners and it's a wonderful piece of equipment.  6 burners, 2 ovens, flat top over a salamander.  Doesn't get any better than that for me.  For wok use I take the burner grate off and put the wok right on the burner - works like a champ.

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post
 

I would not buy a commercial style stove that had a ring burner. They need the star shaped burners for even heating. So what if a pan turns blue? Some of my stainless is discolored form use on high heat and it doesn't bother me in the least. I have one stainless pan I love for high heat steak searing, I get it to smoking hot, add a tiny bit of oil and in goes the steak, cook until the steak slides with a pan shake, flip, turn heat down and let it finish.

The blue streaks are easily removed with a little Bar Keepers Friend.  I prefer the powder over the liquid.

post #10 of 19

I would love a larger "commercial range" vs my standard home one..  I cook with all Vollrath pans in the 12"-14" range and my standard home unit can't seem to get me a even heat on them due to there size and if I use 2 that size on my high heat burners forget trying to use the back burners as you will only be heating 1/4-1/2 the pan then.

 

I am leaning towards a Wolf on our remodel but may have to look at other choices.  (suggestions)

would love 4 burner & grill.

post #11 of 19

Do your homework - read customer reviews especially.  The "prosumer" commercialized ranges don't always deliver.  If you want commercial you have to get commercial for quality.  The prettied up stainless clad facade with home grade guts get lots of complaints.

post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 

Not just this thread, but several other sources, recommend American and Imperial over Viking and Wolf, for a home/commercial range.

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/50096/advice-on-buying-a-commercial-style-freestanding-range-for-the-home

post #13 of 19


Wolf ovens are made by one company and it's stoves and broilers by another. My humble opinion they are junk

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #14 of 19

If I ever win the Lottery, I'd love a (Dual?) Aga. LOL Not that I'd cook a 28 lb turkey, but because they look so cool. Guess I can dream.

 

 

http://ppebble.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2012-02-10T10:25:00-08:00&max-results=3

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v80), quality = 90

post #15 of 19

If I win the lottery I'm getting a La Cornue Grand Palais with a wall rotisserie. But first I'll need to buy a new house that can fit it.

 

post #16 of 19
*drools*
post #17 of 19

You & me both. The French model is not too shabby either. There's a pic of it in the link I posted (in light blue).  I do like the cream, or black with gold handles. Maybe Martha would come over, and teach me how to use it. ;-) Then, I'd need a new black & gold refrigerator.

Check these out, as well.

 

http://www.appliancist.com/vintage_retro_appliances/antique-appliances-by-restart-srl-modern-technology-classic-italian.html

 

post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post
 


Wolf ovens are made by one company and it's stoves and broilers by another. My humble opinion they are junk

I own one and couldn't agree more.  Too bad I didn't see that chef talk, buying a commercial range, thread before I laid my money down.

post #19 of 19

FWIW I own this American range 30" stove, and I'm perfectly happy with it. 

 

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