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Tired of soggy bottoms!

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Have followed all the various chefs' advice from baking blind, pricking the pastry with a fork, oven has to be hot before you put in pastry case, but everything I try still fails, and I end up with a soggy bottom in my quiches that always has to be discarded.

 

If I've tried all the various methods and nothing is working, what am I doing wrong? Help please :)

post #2 of 17

Not sure as to what pastry and dish you use so I will tell you mine.

 

I use:

a) A shortcrust pastry or pate brisee as a base

b) A 9"x 2" round pastry ring on parchment paper or a quiche pan with removable bottom as these heat up the pastry more evenly

c) Always bake blind in a hot oven (usually around 400 degrees fahrenheit) for about 20 mins until pastry edges are lightly brown, then take it out of oven, remove the weight (whatever you are using beans, rice or pie weights) and then return to the oven for another approximately 5 mins until base of pastry is dry

d) Add cold or room temp ingredients (never warm or hot ingredients) and bake until done

 

Wha-la no soggy pastry!

 

Hope that helps :)

post #3 of 17

I do the same as @Fablesable only with one addition. After baking blind and removing the weights, I brush the pastry with egg white before returning it to the oven.

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post #4 of 17

Just to explain @cheflayne's post further.  The egg wash provides a barrier to the wetness of the filling making the crust soggy. It's not perfect of course, but it can help. 

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post #5 of 17

And I do take another step besides the ones mentioned.

I add a layer of grated cheese on top the pre-baked crust and put it back into the oven, just to have the cheese melted and then. after it has all cooled

I add the rest of the filling.

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Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Wer den Pfennig nicht ehrt,

Ist des Talers nicht wehrt !

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post #6 of 17

Into an oven preheated to 425F I blind bake my tart shells for 15 minutes.  The weights are then removed and the shell brushed with beaten egg/egg white and baked for another 30 minutes.  All on the top or next to the top rack.  Just do a search in this forum on my user name to view my documentation on tarts.

 

None of this 350F at 20-30 minutes on the middle rack.  NO WAY!

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #7 of 17

I do mine like Chef Layne, I brush beaten  EGG WHITE on the lower crust and then prebake my shells. This has the same effect as poring polyurethane or shellac  on an object, it stops moisture  from getting through. You can even use a can of dried albumin sold in a lot of markets. Do Not Use  Whole Egg as yolks do not repel as well when in the mix plus sour fast.

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 17

Of course, you unmold the tart or quiche as soon as you can, and put it on a wire rack to cool down. Otherwise condensation will form on the bottom.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Of course, you unmold the tart or quiche as soon as you can, and put it on a wire rack to cool down. Otherwise condensation will form on the bottom.

 

...never worked for me.  Using my method, I'll leave the tart cooling in the rack for a couple of hours and no condensation has ever formed.  Even after unmolding a couple of hours later.  8)

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 17

My method is similar to Berdny's, but instead of cheese I use breadcrumbs - I brush the shells with beaten egg and then sprinkle them with breadcrumbs.

post #11 of 17

For my quiches, once completely baked for 45 minutes, I then line the corners and any other open space(s) with gruyere cheese and bake for additional 10 minutes to seal the holes.  Works for me!   :chef: 


Edited by kokopuffs - 2/26/15 at 2:11am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

I use exactly the same method, tin, greaseproof paper, baking beans on top,oven temp the same,  but I still get a soggy bottom! lol

post #13 of 17

What type of pastry recipe do you use?

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ptarmagan View Post
 

I use exactly the same method, tin, greaseproof paper, baking beans on top,oven temp the same,  but I still get a soggy bottom! lol


I use Ruhlman's 3:2:1 ratio mentioned in his book Ratio.  And again I bake at 425 F.  Try baking longer, for at least 1 - 1.5 hrs.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #15 of 17

Hello, one important thing is cooking, you should never do firings violent, Pastry and pastry Paffy 170 ° must have time to cook and do not burn. For pies: (pan with holes for better cook the bottom, or use the system inverse, baking paper and pastry filling last course punctured). The system of the French tarte tatin. Excuse my terrible English are Italian

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marios View Post ... For pies: (pan with holes for better cook the bottom, or use the system inverse, baking paper and pastry filling last course punctured). The system of the French tarte tatin. Excuse my terrible English are Italian

 

Vent holes in the bottom of the pan. That makes sense. Like this?


Edited by OregonYeti - 3/2/15 at 5:49pm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndy View Post
 

And I do take another step besides the ones mentioned.

I add a layer of grated cheese on top the pre-baked crust and put it back into the oven, just to have the cheese melted and then. after it has all cooled

I add the rest of the filling.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

Of course, you unmold the tart or quiche as soon as you can, and put it on a wire rack to cool down. Otherwise condensation will form on the bottom.

 

I do both. I'll have to try the egg white thingie, but the layer of cheese acts as a barrier to the moisture, and removing it to a rack, as ordo says, lets air circulate preventing a lot of moisture buildup. I usually remove the bottom from the sides or release from a springform pan and rack it. It also helps to let it rest and cool a bit. 

 

It also depends on what your filler is. I have, in my possession, one of the greatest savory pie recipes ever, and it took me at least 4 tries to get the bottom dry-ish. I've been deciding whether or not to share here at chef talk. It's the only recipe I don't share - unless you bribe me with wine. . .

 

At any rate, it includes tomatoes, and I usually salt them and drain them for hours before assembling (and use the tomato water for something else). Sometimes ingredients release their moisture after salting while cooking. If your filler is really wet with insufficient binders, it will make for a soggy bottom no matter how much blind baking you do. 

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