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The first one to grab an 8 or a 10 inch chef & a,W v. a V

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I am considering replacing my Classic Ikon Wusthof  Santoku 7inch  my all purpose, go to chef knife. With A victorinox 8inch , but what about getting a 10 inch victor  ? or is that too much knife in an apartment kitchen ? 

Firstly do you like the idea of moving from A Wusthof that I have to a Victorinox ?

And secondly do you like 8 inch or 10 inch?

My cooking is mainly with ordinary chickens vegetables cutting up steak mincing chopping meat & vegetables would a 10 inch be a nice extra luxury or could it be too big.

 

 

Thanks

Alex

post #2 of 19
Which Victorinox do you have in mind? The thin stamped or the heavy forged one?
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 


47521 a stamped blade 10 inch . The 8 inch would also be a stamp blade. I think I'm thinking of a lighter agile knife

post #4 of 19

Kitchen size isn't really all that limiting a factor.

 

I've known people on boats whose galleys would make even efficiency apartment kitchens look like vast spaces, but who could turn out enough good food for a mob of hungry cruisers.

 

And thik today of the modern line cook at a station.  Just enough space to efficiently work.

 

So, what's the largest number of people you are likely to cook for in, say, the next year?  That should be your decider on how large a knife to get.

 

If it's just you alone, or you and up to about 3 other people for a single meal, then 8 inches probably will be just fine.  I'm not necessarily a "bigger is better" fan - I think that you should be using a knife which is appropriate for the tasks, rather than something that is big, just for the sake of being big.  A very, very occasional large meal prep session can be done just with a shorter knife.  It's a choice between a shorter blade which will weigh less and be likely more nimble for your day-to-day work, versus the occasional higher volume, where the larger blade just works better.

 

An alternative is a 225 to 240 mm blade.  "Once Upon A Time...." it was not uncommon for good knife makers (read French Sabatier makers) to have 225 mm knives in their lineup.  I have one, an old carbon steel "Chef au Ritz" from Veritable Knives of France.  Wonderful size - not too long, not too short.

 

Or, you can try one of the 240 mm Japanese knives, such as a Fujiwara FKM 240 mm gyuto.  There, the blade is thin, and it's made of AUS-8 steel, which is better than the mass-market "X50CrMoV15", aka krupp 4116 steel (used both by Victorinox and by Wusthof).  You get the benefit of a harder steel (like the Wusties), with less thickness (like the stamped Vic's), and the Fujiwara FKM is not notorious for chipping, unlike some VG-10 blades.  Price is very reasonable, at $83 at CKTG.

 

And how are you keeping your current Wustie santoku sharp?

 

(I keep coming back to thinking that the sharpening process is probably more critical than almost any other factor)

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 


Hi I'm really looking for the best value Dollar and I was very impressed with what I have read and heard about theVictorinox . I like the knife I have ,but I think I can do a little better for the same price or cheaper I only paid $45 for. I don't cook for many people and sometimes just for myself . But I sometimes cook complex meals . I have to chop and diced many vegetables Like making a minestrone soup. I cook in one night for five days worth of food.   I like doing a lot of applesauce. My cooking can be laborious and take an hour to two hours of prep.Maybe an old MAC ? O' one more thing, I love to lift up large amounts of cut food with the side of my knife to place in the pot the Santoku can do this so well . 


Edited by Alexbel - 2/18/15 at 9:08pm
post #6 of 19

Just buy the 8" Vic that's $40 if it's apartment cooking.  It is probably a better knife than what you have now.  I use one for professional cooking and that puppy is way easier to keep sharp than the house knives, or the fancy Solingen people get ripped off on these days.  I've converted people that laughed at me initially.  The Vic is easy to keep sharp. 

 

Although the Fujiwara FKM 240 mm gyuto is a good knife, it is probably overkill for your needs.  I have $1,000 in knives that I never use anymore and I use the $40 Vic all day, everyday, year 'round.  And, it's the best $40 you can spend in this economy.  And if something happens to it, meh.  I get a new one every year and just give the old one away.  And that's really to just help people out, not because of the knife.

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 


Thank you , one question, has anyone here tried a vintage MAC? they come up on eBay for around $30 within 9 inch blade. 

post #8 of 19

I don't know much from experience other than hearing they were good.  But that can mean anything.  Some people think knives that were crushed by the VIC in Cook's Illustrated are good knives.  I've heard great things about MAC knives from many people though.  I'd say this: if you get those knives off Ebay, you'll need to probably have to get a good stone and use some, or a lot of elbow grease just to get it squared away.  Most of the time the Vic is pretty darned sharp out of the box.  The first one I bought was sharper out of the box than the fresh knives on knife day at my job (I've been saying that company sucks for years though, as do the knives).  I was slicing juicy tomatoes like nothing.  The skins on fresh peppers didn't exist.  You may have to put a lot of work into getting some used knife into shape again.  You'd be better off just doing that with the santoku knife and only buying the stone without the MAC.  I wouldn't waste that effort and money on a MAC knife honestly.  Unless you just want to have a cool knife they don't make anymore.  Trust me, the Vic Fibrox handle knife is awesome.  I will admit I have heard that not every one comes out of the box as consistent as the next, but that was quite a few years ago.  I read that online.  I've never heard that from a person who I know bought one or a few.  I don't even use my boning knife.  I use the 8" Vic 'cuz it's so easy to wield and has a thin blade. 

 

You will eventually need a stone, but not for awhile if you care for the edge properly.  When you do get that stone, whip that santoku knife into shape and you really won't need anything else except a paring knife. People like to get crazy with knives and having cool stuff.  Don't bother.  Trust me.  If you learn how to use a knife well, you'll find most of those Japanese knives are awesome, but not needed. Master a cheap chef and paring knife for everything first, for like years, before you get toys.

post #9 of 19

First off the Ikon is a marginally better knife than the Vic, the steel, though the same alloy, is harder, and if the slicer is any indication I'd say the Ikon santoku is also a little thinner at the edge.  So if replacing with a Vic go with the big Knife.

 

 

 

Rick

post #10 of 19

If it's the best value for the dollar, then you should first sink just a little bit of money into some good gear to make and keep your knives sharp.  Do that before buying a new knife.  I noted your posting from January of this year about sharpening on the cheap andf sandpaper.  UGGGGHHHHH!!!!!!

 

As one of our former contributors put it, "Knife Buying Recommendation 1:  If you don’t know how to sharpen,  don’t want to learn, and won’t or can’t invest in one of the choices which don’t require much learning – my suggestion is to stick with very cheap knives.  Anything expensive is just a waste of money."  (Boar D Laze, CookFoodGood.com, "What You Need to Know About Kitchen Knives")

 

 And I'm not talking about gear that's all that expensive - probably in the $80 range.  It will be cheaper and much, MUCH more effective in the long run - by far - than even getting a new knife

 

First, get a 12 inch fine Idahone ceramic hone.  They run $32 at Chef Knives To Go ("CKTG").  And a Bester 1200 grit water stone will put you back $46.90.  And now, for the really expensive item - a Chef Knives To Go angle guide.  It will cost you three whole cents (talk about price gouging).

 

Next, read this thread from Chad Ward about sharpening:  http://forums.egullet.org/topic/26036-knife-maintenance-and-sharpening/

 

Then if you want to read more, read Chad Ward's book, An Edge In The Kitchen.  If you have access to a relatively good public library or library system, then you can read it for free.  It's a good read and not all that long to read.  And it covers just about everything you need to know about starting to sharpen your own knives.

 

Now, about used MAC knives - I've bought some off of eBay myself.  And I don't regret buying them.  However, keep in mind that MAC knives come in all sizes, shapes and series.

 

What you are probably seeing are used knives in the "Original" series.  Rounded tip and all.  Good knives, but basic.  And if it's a used relatively cheap chef's knife you need, then the MAC knife you should be specifically looking for is the CK-90.  That's the largest knife in the Original series.  Length overall is 14-1/2 inches, blade length is 9 inches.  Keep in mind that many sellers may not list or know the model number or the series.  Sellers may identify by length, without necessarily saying whether it is blade or length overall that's measured.  If in doubt about the length, then contact the seller.  it goes without saying (but I will say it anyway, since the threads on this forum are read by many people anyway) that you need to add in the shipping cost and sales tax, if applicable.  And don't be surprised if you need to sharpen the knife after buying it.  After all, you are buying it used.

 

Otherwise, the CK-90 Original series knife is actually a good blade, even if it's really basic.

 

Galley Swiller

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexbel View Post
 

I am considering replacing my Classic Ikon Wusthof  Santoku 7inch  my all purpose, go to chef knife. With A victorinox 8inch , but what about getting a 10 inch victor  ? or is that too much knife in an apartment kitchen ? 

Firstly do you like the idea of moving from A Wusthof that I have to a Victorinox ?

And secondly do you like 8 inch or 10 inch?

My cooking is mainly with ordinary chickens vegetables cutting up steak mincing chopping meat & vegetables would a 10 inch be a nice extra luxury or could it be too big.

 

 

Thanks

Alex

Woah there... Why in the world would you want to replace your Wusthof Ikon 6 1/2" Santoku with a cheap P.O.S. Victorinox?? 

Don't listen to that guy!!

 

Little known fact: Wusthofs aren't only the most popular brand sold in stores, there actually some of the best knives in the world. They're made out of a high carbon steel which provides for much better edge retention than most any other metal used for kitchen knives, much better than the high quality stainless used in all of Victorinox's blades. Stainless is softer than carbon, which makes Wusthof's blades sharper than Victorinox's.

 

Another fact to be noted: Victorinox's Fibrox handle is constructed poorly and features only a partially tanged blade vs. Wusthof Ikon's superior handle design which not only includes a triple rivet full tanged construction but is also fashioned out of a much stronger plastic. If you cook at least twice a week, the Fibrox handle will have to be replaced within a year because it will have fallen apart. Also, instead of being smooth like Wusthof's handles the Fibrox handles are coated in a pourus texture which traps bacteria, germs, and grease making the Fibrox handles not only pieces of crap but also unsanitary as heck!

 

And why would you want to have to replace you knife every year? When you think about it, that's definitely going to add up. $1000 over the next 25 years spent on replacing A SINGLE KNIFE... Ridiculous! -- $1650 if you're replacing the 10" one... Makes absolutely no sense. 

 

I don't know about you, but when I buy something I like to know that what I'm buying is so good I'll never have to replace it again for the rest of my life.. Sound idealistic? Well it's not. Check out a brand called CUTCO. The Rolls Royce, or the Rolex if you will, of kitchen knives.. That is, the only knives in the world that are so phenomenal that the company is actually confident enough to back them with a forever guarantee so you never have to pay to replace them. They'll outlive your entire family, haha, no joke! Among Rolls Royce's and Rolex's, it's one of the only things you can buy once, use every single day, and never have to pay to replace. They're made out of surgical grade high carbon stainless steel, which holds an edge just like a Wusthof but is dishwasher safe, better looking and believe it or not, much more durable than Wusthof. Won't chip like Wusthof's straight edges are known to do, which I hope hasn't been a problem for you!

Plus the handles are the absolute most comfortable out of any knife I've ever held, super ergonomically designed. Like Wusthof, they feature a full tanged triple rivet construction. But, unlike the lower quality plastic that Wusthof's handles use, CUTCO's are made out of thermo-resin which is the same exact stuff that bowling balls and NFL football helmets are made out of. Practically indestructible and very beautiful, I have the white handles and they look like polished marble.

They're more expensive than Victorionox but more than twice the quality of Wusthof and literally guaranteed to be the last knife you'll ever have to buy. You don't even have to sharpen them yourself, they'll maintenance them for free for the rest of your life. Also no joke. 

PM me for more info on what kind of knife you need and I can probably help you save some cash too!

post #12 of 19

Oh Man!  Not CUTCO again!

 

Overpriced, and dependent upon the factory to sharpen.  Definitely not the best bang for the buck.  Even some very good knives such as the Fujiwara FKM and the Tojiro DP are waaay better than CUTCO - and WAAAAYYYYY cheaper to boot!

 

The company insists the knife edges are not serrated, when they clearly are.

 

And ergonomic handles?  Anyone who uses a pinch grip finds ergo handles to be a big, BIG problem.

 

To really save money, and to avoid being without a knife, get some real sharpening gear and have at it.

 

But, if you doubt what I say here, use the ChefTalk search bar and search out the threads on CUTCO.  The posts will be an eyeful - and not in the least favorable to CUTCO.

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie Escobar View Post
 

Woah there... Why in the world would you want to replace your Wusthof Ikon 6 1/2" Santoku with a cheap P.O.S. Victorinox?? 

Don't listen to that guy!!

 

Little known fact: Wusthofs aren't only the most popular brand sold in stores, there actually some of the best knives in the world. They're made out of a high carbon steel which provides for much better edge retention than most any other metal used for kitchen knives, much better than the high quality stainless used in all of Victorinox's blades. Stainless is softer than carbon, which makes Wusthof's blades sharper than Victorinox's.

 

Another fact to be noted: Victorinox's Fibrox handle is constructed poorly and features only a partially tanged blade vs. Wusthof Ikon's superior handle design which not only includes a triple rivet full tanged construction but is also fashioned out of a much stronger plastic. If you cook at least twice a week, the Fibrox handle will have to be replaced within a year because it will have fallen apart. Also, instead of being smooth like Wusthof's handles the Fibrox handles are coated in a pourus texture which traps bacteria, germs, and grease making the Fibrox handles not only pieces of crap but also unsanitary as heck!

 

And why would you want to have to replace you knife every year? When you think about it, that's definitely going to add up. $1000 over the next 25 years spent on replacing A SINGLE KNIFE... Ridiculous! -- $1650 if you're replacing the 10" one... Makes absolutely no sense. 

 

I don't know about you, but when I buy something I like to know that what I'm buying is so good I'll never have to replace it again for the rest of my life.. Sound idealistic? Well it's not. Check out a brand called CUTCO. The Rolls Royce, or the Rolex if you will, of kitchen knives.. That is, the only knives in the world that are so phenomenal that the company is actually confident enough to back them with a forever guarantee so you never have to pay to replace them. They'll outlive your entire family, haha, no joke! Among Rolls Royce's and Rolex's, it's one of the only things you can buy once, use every single day, and never have to pay to replace. They're made out of surgical grade high carbon stainless steel, which holds an edge just like a Wusthof but is dishwasher safe, better looking and believe it or not, much more durable than Wusthof. Won't chip like Wusthof's straight edges are known to do, which I hope hasn't been a problem for you!

Plus the handles are the absolute most comfortable out of any knife I've ever held, super ergonomically designed. Like Wusthof, they feature a full tanged triple rivet construction. But, unlike the lower quality plastic that Wusthof's handles use, CUTCO's are made out of thermo-resin which is the same exact stuff that bowling balls and NFL football helmets are made out of. Practically indestructible and very beautiful, I have the white handles and they look like polished marble.

They're more expensive than Victorionox but more than twice the quality of Wusthof and literally guaranteed to be the last knife you'll ever have to buy. You don't even have to sharpen them yourself, they'll maintenance them for free for the rest of your life. Also no joke. 

PM me for more info on what kind of knife you need and I can probably help you save some cash too!

 

This guy drank the Koolaid.  A lot of their knives are junk.  I have two of them.  They dull so fast.  I have to sharpen them all the time, hone them all day. There are differences in edges on knives based on metal, grind and angle.  They sharpen easily, but dull fast.  They're meant to take a pounding and not chip, but if you use a knife properly, that is not an issue, unless it is a Wusthof.  I have to sharpen these paperweights so much more than any knife I've ever owned.  And that includes a Walmart knife I found outside.  The Vic is perfect for apartment cooking.  That is the whole point of OPs inquery.  The Vic is designed to be nothing more than a knife that stays sharp and cost less.  What else does the home cook need? 

 

I love people who put so much stock in fancy knives.  I took a POS knife I found outside and spent weeks sharpening it and it works fine.  It's not awesome.  It blows in comparison to a Vic, but not a Wusthof.  The Wusthof chips more lol.  But the cook/chef makes the knife, not the other way around.  People think having these glorious knives makes a big difference.  I've prepped 100s lbs of veggies all day with garbage knives that really worked the same as $200+ knives with some sharpening.  I

 

t's like people that make a thing of running shoes when the best runners in the world are barefoot most of their lives.  Some of the best cooks and chefs I've ever worked with could care less about fancy knives.  They have a few and don't put much stock in them.  They have average junk or just use house knives.  People are so superstitious about knives it is unreal.  This point would not include sushi though.  That really does require a really nice knife.  I spent years with one POS knife for eveything.  No boning knife.  No paring knife.  Just one junk generic Solingen 7 1/2" chef knife that knife companies use, and I think I actually sharpened that less than the Wusthof lol.  I kind of miss the days when I would pull out my single Vic in a plastic case and everyone else has their whole knife roll with them like it serves any purpose except to look more official, and I chop and cook all the same, or possibly better.

 

Popular = nothing.  Meth is popular, doesn't mean you should do it.  Best knives, okay.  This is personal opinion clouding the issues. Most of their knives are average or junk in edge retention.  They dull fast.  They reshaarpen easily too.  But if you are actually a cook, then you want to chop, not grind all day.  The Vic trumps that Santoku in edge retention bro.  Sorry.  Cut a bag of onions and 25 lbs of tomatoes a day and get back to me on what worked better for that.  A new just unboxed Vic or a Wusthof.  That would be way more important than questionable reputation or "durability".  If a company uses outdated methods that are still costly, while newer cheaper methods exist that are just as good or better for one purpose, then tradition is being held onto by people afraid to question ancient orthodoxies.  There was a time when saying a Wusthof is nothing special was blasphemy.  Not anymore.  I'm not saying the Vic trumps all Wusthofs in all ways, but for what he needs a knife for?

 

LOL.  The full tang argument.  It's for apartment cooking.  If he breaks the handle I don't know what he's doing.  I've never broken one and I use it at work.  Cite me one documented case of this handle issue. It didn't happen to you.  It has never happened to a soul I know.  There is no buzz about it.  So many people have used this knife time and time again with no such issue.  I use it at work not only because its cheap and its no big deal if something happens to it, but it works like a champ. 

 

I've never had this problem.  None of the Vics I've given out have done this.   A friend of mine has had one I gave him years ago and he has had no problems.  We all have problems with not enough time in a day to keep our fancier knives sharp though.  The whole full tang thing is amusing.  In theory, yeah it works better.  So many knives without full tang do not have the issues you describe, while many full tang knives do have problems with handles falling apart.  For $40 bucks and a sharp hard edge, forget full tang. 

 

Reading is a critical skill for text communication. I did not say he had to nor advocated for replacing the knife every year.  I just do because it is so cheap and it is sharp out of the box, and I share the love.  It's better for me financially and them practically than handing them a Wusthof lol. 

 

I actually got 5 for $120 a few years back and that was still way better money spent than most $120 knives, and they're $30 @ http://www.restaurantsource.com/victorinox?ps=360&gclid=CKiLrvvD78MCFUY8gQodqWgARA right now btw OP.  I did not say get rid of the knife.  In fact I advocate he get a good stone and whip it into shape, and beat on the Vic instead until he has a real need for a serious knife for 10 minutes.

 

What I'm getting at is that an apartment cook has no need to spend more than $40 on a knife unless he wants to be cool, when tons of line cooks use the Vic and are happy with it.  I have two that I use and one is for pure abuse and beating.  I've thrown it for target practice out of respect for its Vic gloriousness.  No half tang issues there so far. 

 

Anyone who shells out the dough for German or French knives is way better off getting a Japanese knife instead.  They are usually much better knives for the same money.  Wusthof and many companies have been riding on the reputation of the days when there was not better game in town for years now.  My biggest financial regret has been my Wusthofs.  My Global, which I also think are over-hyped, although decent, is better. 

 

Point is, bang for buck and apartment cooking. 

 

Oh man.  Really CUTCO knives lol.  DO NOT LISTEN TO ANYONE IF THEY ADVOCATE CUTCO LOLZOR!

 

"They're made out of surgical grade high carbon stainless steel, which holds an edge just like a Wusthof but is dishwasher safe, better looking and believe it or not, much more durable than Wusthof. Won't chip like Wusthof's straight edges are known to do, which I hope hasn't been a problem for you!"

 

YEP sounds like the VIC, but the Vic is easier to sharpen and cheaper.  The Vic does not chip like a pricey Wusthof btw.  Better grind.  Its like good coffee.  It can be more expensive all around, but a poor grind ruins the whole point. 

 

LOL.  A company that forces their "salesforce" to buy the full set as they rope them in to hock pricey junk no one wants for a prep cook's salary is not to be trusted.  You'll make more money reffering your friends for a job than selling those.  That will also be the closest thing to a sale you will ever make LOL.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie Escobar View Post
 

 

Little known fact: Wusthofs aren't only the most popular brand sold in stores, there actually some of the best knives in the world. They're made out of a high carbon steel which provides for much better edge retention than most any other metal used for kitchen knives, much better than the high quality stainless used in all of Victorinox's blades. Stainless is softer than carbon, which makes Wusthof's blades sharper than Victorinox's.

 

Another fact to be noted: Victorinox's Fibrox handle is constructed poorly and features only a partially tanged blade vs. Wusthof Ikon's superior handle design which not only includes a triple rivet full tanged construction but is also fashioned out of a much stronger plastic. If you cook at least twice a week, the Fibrox handle will have to be replaced within a year because it will have fallen apart. Also, instead of being smooth like Wusthof's handles the Fibrox handles are coated in a pourus texture which traps bacteria, germs, and grease making the Fibrox handles not only pieces of crap but also unsanitary as heck!

 

 

 Don't know if he's actually a cutco shill, this is actually his third post and most of them are 1 post wonders.  But he certainly is completely ignorant, and doesn't bother reading the comments in a post. For starters, if he had read he'd know that wusty steel=Vic steel, and if he actually knew anything about that steel he'd know it is low-end stuff.  I've flagged the comment so hopefully this is the last we'll hear from Charlie on cutco, or anything else knife related.

 

 

Rick

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 

Wonderful answers Thanks everyone 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 

I don't know much from experience other than hearing they were good.  But that can mean anything.  Some people think knives that were crushed by the VIC in Cook's Illustrated are good knives.  I've heard great things about MAC knives from many people though.  I'd say this: if you get those knives off Ebay, you'll need to probably have to get a good stone and use some, or a lot of elbow grease just to get it squared away.  Most of the time the Vic is pretty darned sharp out of the box.  The first one I bought was sharper out of the box than the fresh knives on knife day at my job (I've been saying that company sucks for years though, as do the knives).  I was slicing juicy tomatoes like nothing.  The skins on fresh peppers didn't exist.  You may have to put a lot of work into getting some used knife into shape again.  You'd be better off just doing that with the santoku knife and only buying the stone without the MAC.  I wouldn't waste that effort and money on a MAC knife honestly.  Unless you just want to have a cool knife they don't make anymore.  Trust me, the Vic Fibrox handle knife is awesome.  I will admit I have heard that not every one comes out of the box as consistent as the next, but that was quite a few years ago.  I read that online.  I've never heard that from a person who I know bought one or a few.  I don't even use my boning knife.  I use the 8" Vic 'cuz it's so easy to wield and has a thin blade. 

 

You will eventually need a stone, but not for awhile if you care for the edge properly.  When you do get that stone, whip that santoku knife into shape and you really won't need anything else except a paring knife. People like to get crazy with knives and having cool stuff.  Don't bother.  Trust me.  If you learn how to use a knife well, you'll find most of those Japanese knives are awesome, but not needed. Master a cheap chef and paring knife for everything first, for like years, before you get toys.


Mckallidon I like your arguments for the Vick it would be the better knife for me "new " It is a better size and "America's test kitchen" convinced me of how good it is. Plus if it were a rose wood handle I could modify it.

 

Gally swiller your right I should lean how to best sharpen what I have .

 

so I should have bought the Vick In the first place, better length . I held a nine inch bread knife up on the blade to see on a cutting board what 8 was like . It was  undoubtedly better 10 inches would've been too long. 61/2 not as good . I could scoop, with a Vic because of it's depth .

 

But I like the Wusthof Santoku , still enough to keep it for a while I don't have a sharpening stone but I have a F Dick's multi cut and as  I use it,it  seemed to improve the edge well .I look forward to a Vick now, in the near future ( an 8 ) . 

 

Charlie , Woah there to you too .I love old cars and watches   Do you by chance sell cars? I'm looking for in 1970 Oldsmobile 88 with a Rolls-Royce engine and a Rolex watch somebody left under the seat.Got one ? Sorry Charlie ,  I wish you could save me some cash I spent too much money this week that's one of the reasons   why I'm not buying another knife. Thank you anyway, I'll keep CUTCO in mind but I've got to keep my sites low for the time being . If I buy a knife, so good, its for  life,and  if I don't like it after a while I'm liable to plunge it straight into my chest just to get rid of it and I've promised myself a hundred crème brûlée's before I die, and 75 duck A' La Oranges . 

 

Bless us and save us .

 

Alex 

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

 

 Don't know if he's actually a cutco shill, this is actually his third post and most of them are 1 post wonders.  But he certainly is completely ignorant, and doesn't bother reading the comments in a post. For starters, if he had read he'd know that wusty steel=Vic steel, and if he actually knew anything about that steel he'd know it is low-end stuff.  I've flagged the comment so hopefully this is the last we'll hear from Charlie on cutco, or anything else knife related.

 

 

Rick

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

First off the Ikon is a marginally better knife than the Vic, the steel, though the same alloy, is harder, and if the slicer is any indication I'd say the Ikon santoku is also a little thinner at the edge.  So if replacing with a Vic go with the big Knife.

 

 

 

Rick


Please do not keep Cutco in mind.  They are junk.  One trick ponies.  Robbing you.  Thank you for being open minded about the Vic.  So many people over-think knives or get superstitious about them.  Although it is the same steel as the Wusthofs, it is a different sharpening.  The edge's grind and angle matters a lot more than the metal sometimes.  If you get a Vic, do not get the hollow grind btw.  Hollow grind is what wrecks many Wusthofs. 

 

I would advise not to sharpen with anything but stones.  Those sharpening station thingys can take off to much metal and put bad angles on the knife, causing more damage.  Get a good set of stones and polish that Santoku up real good.  I myself love santokus.  I would also say get a cermaic honing rod.  It will work with the metal on the Vic and your Wusthof better.

 

Good luck and take care. 

post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 

 

 


Please do not keep Cutco in mind.  They are junk.  One trick ponies.  Robbing you.  Thank you for being open minded about the Vic.  So many people over-think knives or get superstitious about them.  Although it is the same steel as the Wusthofs, it is a different sharpening.  The edge's grind and angle matters a lot more than the metal sometimes.  If you get a Vic, do not get the hollow grind btw.  Hollow grind is what wrecks many Wusthofs. 

 

I would advise not to sharpen with anything but stones.  Those sharpening station thingys can take off to much metal and put bad angles on the knife, causing more damage.  Get a good set of stones and polish that Santoku up real good.  I myself love santokus.  I would also say get a cermaic honing rod.  It will work with the metal on the Vic and your Wusthof better.

 

Good luck and take care. 


Well mckallidon , if you believe I'll keep Cutco's in mind , do you believe the rest of my statement ?

You're very welcome about the Vic . 

the F.Dick is a honing and light sharpening rod .please look up multi cut, to see . If I use it properly why would I hurt the knife ?

 

Thank's , and take care as well.

post #18 of 19

Oh okay cool.  Sorry for the bad response.  Respect.  Well, a rod is for honing.  Honing and real sharpening are different.  Sharpen with stones.  Get a set of whetstones eventually.  But I thought you were referring to one of those "sharpening stations".  My bad.  You're doing good. 

 

Peace.

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckallidon View Post
 

Oh okay cool.  Sorry for the bad response.  Respect.  Well, a rod is for honing.  Honing and real sharpening are different.  Sharpen with stones.  Get a set of whetstones eventually.  But I thought you were referring to one of those "sharpening stations".  My bad.  You're doing good. 

 

Peace.


Hi, mckallidon I don't think your response was bad at all.

And I'm completely convinced that stones are the true way to go and I really look forward to acquiring some. I found your writing very sincere, and you understood  the premise of my question especially well . Your comments on the importance of stones as opposed to rod didn't bother me in the least but in the beginning of your response... ''please do not keep CUTCO in mind ', I kind of felt Oh  does this guy understand?, the whole Charlie section in my response is a running bit of a joke { "no offense to Charlie please"} although I try to express my true feelings about his post "underneath". (except the "thank you anyway")NONE of it is meant literally . It's a spoof . The part about spending too much money this week, that's true.

 

Respectfully

Alex 

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