or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Authentic Mexican (for hard or soft tacos, burritos, Tostitos Scoops, etc...) Great for Parties, social gatherings ect.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Authentic Mexican (for hard or soft tacos, burritos, Tostitos Scoops, etc...) Great for Parties, social gatherings ect.

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Authentic Mexican (for hard or soft tacos, burritos, Tostitos Scoops, etc...)

1 lb. ground turkey
1 Sweet Vidalia Onion, chopped
2 Small (orange) Habanero peppers, chopped
8-10 medium sized pieces of raw garlic, minced
1/4 cup of raw white rice (cooked)
1/4 - 1/2 lb. Shredded Mild Cheddar Cheese
3/4 jar of chunky med-hot salsa
1 can of refried beans
2 Tbsp. Vegetable Oil
Accent (general amount)
1/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Smoked Paprika (generous amount)
Chili Powder (generous amount)
Garlic Powder (sparingly)
Black Pepper (generous amount)
Ground Cumin Seed (generous amount)

Add your two tablespoons of oil to skillet.  Immediately add your ground turkey.  Turkey should be crumbled with a fork while cooking and cooked on a temp no higher than simmer until no longer pink.  Add your Accent, pepper, garlic powder, chili powder, smoked paprika, garlic and onion, salt, sugar and salsa, mixing thoroughly.  Next, add the refried beans, cheese and cooked rice, mixing well.  Continue cooking on simmer, stirring as needed for 10 minutes

 

 

We are looking for feedback on this Recipe we have just created so let us know what you guys think!

 

thanks in Advance,

 

Nita And Sons.

post #2 of 11

Authentic Mexican and Cheddar Cheese is contradictory as far as naming things imho. (In My Humble Opinion)

 

I also think the dish suffers from trying to do to many things at once. It's a taco filling, a burrito filling, a dip and so on. I don't think it serves any of those well. I'll critique it more from the point of a taco or burrito filling. 

 

Skip the Accent and the sugar, neither serves much purpose here imho and again go against authenticity. If you're already using 8-10 cloves of garlic minced, garlic powder is overkill and should be skipped. 

 

A note on salt. Varying salsa brands have very different added salt. So you need to adapt  the amount of salt you use to balance with the salsa used. And a measurement woudl be useful as there is no standard jar size of salsa. 

 

Beans and rice I would heat or cook separately and let people add them separately or build them in the taco/burrito as separate layers. Just for me personally, No beans or rice in my taco thank you, rice on the side of the burrito, not in it.  I wouldn't want them all mixed together. Nor would it look as good mixed as it does separately if you do use them in the burrito or taco as separate layers prefilled. Cheese separate as well. We do eat with our eyes first. 

 

1/2 of a White or yellow onion instead of a  whole vidalia. A sweet onion is not ideal for this sort of dish. But then I don't think the sugar belongs either as already noted.  And only half as I'm no longer seasoning the beans or rice. you could use the other half with the beans and rice if you prefer. Similarly, reduce the garlic by half as well. 

 

Technique change up:  Bloom the cumin, chili powder and pepper in the hot oil for 30 seconds or so, then add the turkey and season with some salt. When the turkey is about 2/3 cooked add the onion and habanero. When the turkey has lost all pinkness, add the chopped garlic. Stir through until aromatic, then add your salsa. Simmer until you've got the texture you want (evaporating excess liquid).  Adjust salt and heat as needed, 

 

Finish with a squeeze of fresh lime or a bit of cider vinegar. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 11

To much heat for authentic Mexican. Most is not very spicy!

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Duly noted. Thanks for your response.
post #5 of 11

In general, we don't eat rice in our tacos. 2 habaneros for 1lb of meat is too much for the average American eater, with the jarred salsa, way too much.

 

Cheddar cheese not authentic Mexican, cooking cheese into the variety of things above is not, either.

 

Mixing refried beans into a variety of things not, either.

 

Accent is pure MSG. Many people allergic and common to Asian foods.

 

Sugar?

 

Chili powder, with habaneros, and jarred salsa...waay too much.

 

Browning ground meat for tacos, burritos, arroz con carne, etc., is to be done at a medium high temperature. To cook it at medium or lower, especially at a simmer, will result in steamed meat. I think only Brits like that kind of thing. Keep in mind, as well, that because of it's low fat content, it might be wise to use more than 2tbsp of oil for the browning.

 

None of what I said is meant to tell you NOT to make this thing, but please don't put Authentic in its title.

 

Hope this works out for you.

 

P.S.

 

One can NOT cook white rice to done with this recipe. 10 minutes? No.

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

again, thanks guys. yeah I realize the name is off and i'm still working on this whole Cooking ordeal. The fact of the matter is that I should have probably stated that this is meant for the ones who like a bit more spiciness in their food. Altering the amount of spice for this recipe is always an option too. I am not to technical on the do's and dont's of cooking, I know what I like and what works for me.

And that goes to say that I not only enjoyed this cooking experience but it taste really good to me. the way people cook it and the slight differ in ingredients is all relative.

post #7 of 11
When you add in the beans and rice, i don't know that there's to much heat then. .
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

indeed. although only one pound of ground turkey is used this makes ALOT of food. it all balances out in the end. still a bit spicy if one is not into spicy foods. I mixed the rice in to add that versatility.

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitaandsons View Post
 

We are looking for feedback on this Recipe we have just created so let us know what you guys think!

 

    You are getting what you asked for so that is a good thing. ;)

 

Bottom line is this

Quote:
Originally Posted by nitaandsons View Post
 

And that goes to say that I not only enjoyed this cooking experience but it taste really good to me. the way people cook it and the slight differ in ingredients is all relative.

 

Big bingo there. Keep cooking. Keep enjoying. Keep learning. :chef: 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone. I had initially decided that I wasn't going to respond to the feedback on this recipe that my son and I put together - that just happened to turn into something so tasty we wanted to share it with all of you. I'm responding only to say that this was a combination of his efforts and mine, just literally in the kitchen throwing ingredients together (experimenting if you will) out of boredom mixed with slight hunger pangs. Since the flavor turned out pretty awesome, we decided to share it with the most daring of you. We were feeling inspired in that moment. We are by no means professional chefs; we just like to get in the kitchen and have fun. We asked for feedback, and we do appreciate the feedback that you've given. You can always choose to omit, change, or add ingredients. I do it myself when I'm trying new recipes. That's part of the fun and joys of cooking! So please, feel free to make all the alterations you need to make - or use it for ideas and inspirations of your own. Then post it for others to try!

Thank you
Nita
post #11 of 11

In Mexico, some cheeses we use for melting are Oaxaca, Chihuahua, Manchego, ranchero, asadero.

For not melting: fresco, ranchero, Cotija, panela, requesón.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Authentic Mexican (for hard or soft tacos, burritos, Tostitos Scoops, etc...) Great for Parties, social gatherings ect.