or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Chocolate This, Chocolate That, My Brain Feels Seized
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chocolate This, Chocolate That, My Brain Feels Seized

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So I work for this cupcake shop and now they are interested in me doing chocolates there, which is fine. Now, though, they don't have a stovetop and as part of the deal, I bring stuff in and sell it to them wholesale, as they provide me certified workspace and an outlet to sell. Concerning the stovetop, I was thinking about a induction cooktop so I could keep the chocolate tempered while doing other things (I'm still baking their stuff too.)

Is there a decent starter induction I can get for under $100? Should i worry about any fancy molds right now, or are the round truffles good enough? Should I include white chocolate right off the bat, or would it be appropriate to wait for a bit? All chocolate will be made by me, starting from cocoa liquor, and if white chocolate, then cocoa butter.

My brain has been working on this for a while that I'm nervous about loosing sight of what is nessecary, which I cant afford to spend anything that I don't need right away.
post #2 of 9

Usually, the induction ranges under $100.00 don't last very long, so you're not going to get very good value for your money.

 

Keeping choc. in the proper temp range needs a very special thermostat for that equipment, and most commercial thermostats aren't very accurate at temps below 150 C (70-ish F) 

 

But there is a piece of equipment you can purchase locally to keep your choc. in this range, and it's fairly cheap too.  It's at your drugstore or local Mal*Wart--an electric hating blanket.  Some of the grow-op/hydroponic stores or gardening stores also sell a "seedling mat" --very similiar to a heating blanket.  It's worth experimenting....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thank you, that's something I've never considered. I could do it the traditional way, as well, but with me storing by stuff there and knowing the other employees, if have to get a locked cage for everything, which I may still do because of the chocolate itself.

I'm assuming a nice thick ceramic bowl would work to help insulate? Like one from a crock pot?
post #4 of 9

A thick ceramic bowl will insulate, but it also will retain heat--not a desirable quality when you need to cool down chocolate.  Best stick with a half-size  s/s  insert 4" deep-- more surface area when you are molding and dipping.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you foodpump. I bought an electric heating pad with an adjustable temperature gauge. It heats from 80*F - 166*F, which was exactly what I was looking for. Three half pans, but I went with the 2 1/2" deep for right now, since we're just starting off.

Do you have any other suggestions?
post #6 of 9

Yup.

If you're going to do any work with chocolate, about the best book I can suggest/endorse is:

"Chocolates and confections" by Peter Grewling

 

The book goes into great detail about chocolate, how it is properly tempered, the various methods of tempering, and the caveats with each method.  Then there are "mother" recipies for caramel, italian nougat, pate de fruit, various ganaches, and the knowledge needed to "convert" or tweak the recipies so you can call them your own.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you. I really appreciate it. RIght now, we're in discussion over what kind of business we are going to establish with each other. At the moment, none of it is coming out of their pockets and only my own. Without the chocolates, they'd have way to much empty shelving space, so we are going to try it out for a bit and then come up with a deal. Consignment, percentage, or wholesale.

 

With that said, I'm working out the pricing right now and I can't seem to remember how to calculate the costs with your tools included. I believe it's for future tools/machines, not ones currently purchased. Do you remember the percentage that they suggest? I can't seem to find it on Google.

 

--- Also, I should have both of his books by tomorrow. Thank you!


Edited by CrystalWernicke - 3/5/15 at 2:53am
post #8 of 9
I have nuwave 2 portable induction cooktop and love it. You can get it for $79 from bjs as well other places. Just remember you might need a new pan one that is magnetic reacting meaning a magnet sticks to the bottom. Its also an en expensive way to try induction cooking before making a large investment in new gear.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
After reviewing, I went with a Mr.Induction, as it'll let me go to 120*f and 100*f, but I also got an electric blanket that has a digital set ranging from 80*f to 166*f. smile.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Chocolate This, Chocolate That, My Brain Feels Seized