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Advice on knife sharpening - Page 2

post #31 of 41

Hi Eve12, welcome to CT. 

There's one aspect that is kind of implicit to some of these new knife/sharpening threads - to pair the knives in question to appropriate maintenance tools and skills. I recommend or gift to friends different knives based on what I know about the person in question's maintenance habits as well as their access to a good sharpener.

post #32 of 41

To revisit the steeling, well within the 20 months since my initial comment Benuser's many admonitions against steeling took hold and I can say with first hand experience that stopping on stones or loaded strops is far superior to steeling, especially where board work is concerned,

 

The beating and subsequent fatigue an edge experiences on the board really demands removal, rather than realignment, of the fatigued metal, and the point contact of rods is especially undesirable here.

 

For the busy pro I have recommended gluing an 8" DMT extra-extra fine diamond plate to a wood paddle, every bit as convenient as a rod but far superior in result.

 

Old hat is old hat, and steels and rods can follow them into the trash with benefit.


Edited by Rick Alan - 12/16/16 at 5:20pm
post #33 of 41

Thanks Foody518,

 

I agree with what you're saying. The one other alternate is to find a reputable sharpening service in your city, and give it to them to sharpen. Better that than ruining an expensive set of knives. 

 

Have a great weekend!

post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eve12 View Post

Thanks Foody518,

I agree with what you're saying. The one other alternate is to find a reputable sharpening service in your city, and give it to them to sharpen. Better that than ruining an expensive set of knives. 

Have a great weekend!

A novice sharpening won't ruin a blade when only using stones. All errors can be undone. Not so for what professionals are able to, with their powered equipment. They can ruin the temper within seconds.
post #35 of 41

Eve12:

using a sharpening stone is not complicated task and if your knives are not abused, something that would take 5 minutes a knife every other month.  pull throughs are either too soft to do anything or can severely damage an edge.  electric sharpeners can easily damage an edge.  electric sharpeners and some pull throughs cost $$, a 6"  Norton Coarse Crystolon/Fine India and a jug of mineral oil will set you back less than $25 and will last for many years.

scott

Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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post #36 of 41

Thanks for your post. That's why I say find a sharpening service you can trust. I am not sure about else where in the world but where I live you have professional services who do not use powered equipment. They actually use stones themselves. Although I do see the point you are trying to make above. Have a good day!

post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Livesey View Post
 

Eve12:

using a sharpening stone is not complicated task and if your knives are not abused, something that would take 5 minutes a knife every other month.  pull throughs are either too soft to do anything or can severely damage an edge.  electric sharpeners can easily damage an edge.  electric sharpeners and some pull throughs cost $$, a 6"  Norton Coarse Crystolon/Fine India and a jug of mineral oil will set you back less than $25 and will last for many years.

scott

 

Scott, appreciate your comment. I should start of by first saying that I have nothing against sharpening stones. In fact, I think everyone
should use one, but the fact is everyone won't use a sharpening stone. I am not saying that using a stone is complicated, but it does take a certain level of skill and technique to be able to get results out of. And yes, there are tons of videos and blog posts on how to use one, but not everyone is willing to invest their time in reading and applying what they see. Some people, like myself will (I am taking a class next year).

People are always looking for the quickest and simplest fix be it knife sharpening or losing weight. This explains why pull throughs and electrics still sell. 

post #38 of 41
I think there's just one guy (custom maker) in Houston area who finishes on stones. $20 bucks per go though, in 2-ish trips or bring in 2 knives at a time and that's the price of a decent waterstone. Learned via online reading and videos because I got knives that deserved to be treated right. After the first 2 hours of struggle, made progress on getting a dull junk stainless beater knife to be less dull. The level of skill required to do better vs worse is not an astronomically high threshold
IMO a good part of why those compromise machines sell is consumer ignorance (towards not even knowing that sharpening is a skill that people can acquire, that stones exist, that knives can get and are supposed to be *really* sharp (actually I'm seeing this side more and more even just sharpening cheap NSF knives for people (kitchen volunteers) and the raised eyebrows expressions and the before and after of prepping tomatoes, potatoes, chicken, etc.)) just as much as it is convenience. Some people are genuinely fine with how the knives cut with those machines. I'd be inclined to think that others just have no clue what they're missing out on and how much difference it can make to have a nice knife and/or a good sharpening method. And some of those folks (due to possibly curiosity or dissatisfaction among other factors) end up on the forums to figure out better than what they've currently got smile.gif
Edited by foody518 - 12/20/16 at 9:17pm
post #39 of 41

I am happy to be part of this forum. I've learn a lot from you guys. It really helped me a lot. Have a nice day to all guys. Just keep on sharing. 

post #40 of 41

stones Vs. machine/pull-thru is ongoing in knife making forums.  finishing on a stone leaves an edge that the new owner can duplicate with one or two stones and a few minutes time.  

Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea
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post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by foody518 View Post

I think there's just one guy (custom maker) in Houston area who finishes on stones. $20 bucks per go though, in 2-ish trips or bring in 2 knives at a time and that's the price of a decent waterstone. Learned via online reading and videos because I got knives that deserved to be treated right. After the first 2 hours of struggle, made progress on getting a dull junk stainless beater knife to be less dull. The level of skill required to do better vs worse is not an astronomically high threshold
IMO a good part of why those compromise machines sell is consumer ignorance (towards not even knowing that sharpening is a skill that people can acquire, that stones exist, that knives can get and are supposed to be *really* sharp (actually I'm seeing this side more and more even just sharpening cheap NSF knives for people (kitchen volunteers) and the raised eyebrows expressions and the before and after of prepping tomatoes, potatoes, chicken, etc.)) just as much as it is convenience. Some people are genuinely fine with how the knives cut with those machines. I'd be inclined to think that others just have no clue what they're missing out on and how much difference it can make to have a nice knife and/or a good sharpening method. And some of those folks (due to possibly curiosity or dissatisfaction among other factors) end up on the forums to figure out better than what they've currently got smile.gif

 

Thanks for sharing your opinion on the matter. As someone else on this forum says: stones vs the rest is always a debate.......

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