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Prime Rib Butchery and uses

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I love prime rib and want to make sure that I am utilizing this cut to it's fullest potential and have a couple of questions about it. (Ribs and Rib Eye Cap removed)

 

1. Is it legit to cut the prime lengthwise so steaks are thicker or is it better to leave it whole and cut steaks with larger surface area. I like a 6 oz steak but wondering if this cut is just more conducive to being portioned into 7 or 8 oz steaks. 

 

2. I know the Rib Cap can be used for all sorts of things, wondering if anyone has rolled/ tied it and used it for more steak portions

 

3. What uses for the Ribs once removed and or other scraps. I was thinking for stock as I'd like to have a natural jus to serve with the     meat. 

post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
I was at a gathering last night and ended up talking to a bunch of chefy people so I shall answer my own thread based on what they thought.

1. It is usually better to not cut the prime lengthwise first. You would end up with some portions having a too high ratio of fat. If trying for a 6 oz portion ask butcher for the smaller primes, and roll the trimmed piece in seran wrap for a nice tight portion

2. Rib Cap, it is better to come up with a different way to use it.

3. Definitely go ahead and use ribs for stock, save the meat for whatever.
post #3 of 17
I've been a bit confused since your initial post. You want to butcher a roast into steaks? I'd cut thick steaks with bone and cap left in place then cook med-rare and serve family style. 6 oz steak would be too skinny
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 

Yes I wanted to take a whole prime rib and turn it into steaks.  My issue is that visually, I'd rather not have a huge piece of bone in steak on the plate. Family style isn't an option where I am. So now I'm thinking this just isn't possible and should just switch to strip loin. But rib steaks are so tasty! I've seen them in just the grocery store smaller but they are probably only using a portion of prime rib for small steaks and packaging the rest as bone in roasts.  

post #5 of 17

What cut are you using exactly?  There is some opportunity here for what we now call craft butchery.

 

You can cook with the bone on and remove it to serve.

 

You can remove the cap like you said and use it as another cut.

 

You can leave the bone on _and_ carve at tableside.

 

You can offer a portion for two, bone on, and carve it tableside.

 

etc.

etc.

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.

etc.

post #6 of 17
Rib eyes really is my favorite but best part is the eye and cap and if possible the bone too. I like all-or-nothing and it had better be thick! 😃

You could have good option with the strip but for prettiest presentation and good taste at that size steak i'd go for a tenderloin. More $ but maybe better overall result.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

Kuan: I don't know what to call the cut other than a bone in prime rib, it is how I've ordered it in the past. We are a 36 seat restaurant and there are only 2 of us in the kitchen at a time and no way servers could carve, so keeping it simple and fast is really essential when I think about what we can do. We are also seasonal, opening in a couple months so glad I have time to figure some stuff out. I love the idea of a plate for 2 people but know we couldn't do it with small menu. 

 

And Brian, Rib eye is my absolute fav too. I've thought about tenderloin I just find that it really isn't great for me flavour wise but agree looks the best. I had a chef pair it with a braised short rib with a really flavourful jus seemed to be well received so I dunno. 

 

I wanted to pair whatever steak with some crispy oysters and horseradish cream if that changes anyone's thought pattern. 

 

Thank you for the feedback!

post #8 of 17
Folks seem to prefer tenderloin tenderness over flavor too often. Recently ate at local steakhouse that had 3 different tenderloin offering, 1 strip, and 1 ribeye. But the ribeye was 10 ounce and the insisted on serving on a sizzling platter. So I had fish. It was good but
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

At this point I'm kinda feeling like ribeye is not the right option, unfortunately. We just aren't a giant steak kinda place. I might have to rethink the entire dish. Crispy oysters might be better with a braised rib as an app or something. So what is the next best steak? Maybe I need to start a new thread. 

post #10 of 17
What about "Italian" roast beef. Cook ahead and slice. Warm to order in hot au jus. Braised rib is yummy but might overwhelm an oyster. Personally, I'd rather just have the oysters... And lots of them.
post #11 of 17

tnks you

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
I guess I saw crispy oysters paired with hangar steak in le pigeon cookbook and loved the idea. Surf and turf but different. But now you say it I think I agree oysters would get lost with beef. The contrast in texture would be nice. Actually I originally thought crispy clams but owner thought oysters sounded better...but I do have to have a steak on menu.
post #13 of 17

I'd look into grass-fed beef for your rib-eyes. We used them awhile back and they were very small, so a 6-7 ounce portion might be thick enough for you to work with.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks Greg great tip, I will talk to my butcher and see if this is possible!
post #15 of 17


The primal rib'' as it falls'' is the term used when buying ribs the way it comes off the cow. Then there is export or 109s which are butchered with backstrap off top deckle off bone in, these are the most common. the rack of bones can be used as bar b q if wanted or stock or braised.

You should average at least 15 good cuts from a boneless as is 40 pound rib after butchering, Doubles or with the bone only 8 cuts.. This is for roasting only

 

. To cut into steaks, varies depending on how many ounce steak you want to cut it in, and with or without the bone .

  In the place I used to work we used about 500 primal ribs a week in season.

In my op[inion a broiler cooked rib steak is the best tasting and best eating of all the steaks.

As for'''' Italian style roast beef, a rib is to expensive a cut to use for this, you are far   better off with top round or a tenderized bottom round.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post
 


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As for'''' Italian style roast beef, a rib is to expensive a cut to use for this, you are far   better off with top round or a tenderized bottom round.

Without a doubt!

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Yeah cool, thank you for taking the time to reply. I feel much more confident in moving forward. Very greatful for this forum as in my rural area there aren't too many experts to talk with.
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