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Heirloom seeds?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

http://www.upworthy.com/100-years-ago-people-were-eating-things-that-most-of-us-will-never-taste-so-what-happened?c=upw1

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #2 of 12


I have a rather extensive seed bank. Heirlooms primarily. Open to trades with anybody who has the same. PM me if interested.

post #3 of 12

The article is way off - real reason is that there are more large companies looking to maximize profit so growing varieties that are less profitable, well aren't grown because they don't make anywhere near as much money, have disease problems... Not because of patents, which wouldn't affect old varieties.

post #4 of 12

Problem is that it is very hard for bigger farmers not to use Monsanto's seeds because if their neighbour uses the patented seed and the wind blows some of them onto the farm without the patented seed then Monsanto sues that farmer and he has to pay up or lose everything.

 

It's a racket lain and simple.

post #5 of 12

Seriously, I dont get how you can't sue Monsanto and your neighbour for contaminating your land?

 

On the other hand, just patent a seed and drive around the country throwing it onto fields and then find the plants!

 

Millions of dollars for a tank of gas...

post #6 of 12

It is next to impossible to sue Monsanto and win. They have many lawyers and very deep pockets. Most farmers don't have $1million to bet on a lawsuit!

post #7 of 12
post #8 of 12

I once asked my ex (the farmer) why he did not just keep seed back to plant the next spring.

His reply was that it was sterile and only good one time around.

 

Most of his corn yield at that time went for animal feed (a "new" super seed lol) and was very tough with no flavor...impossible to eat.

I asked him if he would plant a few acres of sweet corn for our personal use.

The seed came from an old timer who had been saving seed since the beginning of time lol.

We left 2 acres unplanted in the middle of a field set aside for Pioneer and we planted by hand.

Now I know why.

 

mimi

post #9 of 12

Farmer troubles aside, It would be great to grow a strain of tomato with a thick membrane, firm cucumbers, or oversized kale...how many years would this take to do it the "right way?"

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SundriedFry View Post
 

Farmer troubles aside, It would be great to grow a strain of tomato with a thick membrane, firm cucumbers, or oversized kale...how many years would this take to do it the "right way?"

Why would you want these?

 

Sorry, am I missing something? 

post #11 of 12

Maybe meant a tomato with a thicker meat and less jelly/seeds? Many heirlooms have that characteristic already.

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SundriedFry View Post
 

Farmer troubles aside, It would be great to grow a strain of tomato with a thick membrane, firm cucumbers, or oversized kale...how many years would this take to do it the "right way?"

 

What's the 'right way'?  You do realize that you would still end up with the same gene either way.  Except with conventional breeding, you end up with a lot of unknown changes.

 

And for time, it would depend how likely you are to get a mutation to do what you want and the amount of resources you have at hand.

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