or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Stir Fry?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone! I am 23, I have always loved to cook and always loves "Asian food." But I have never cooked any. So I just made up my mind that I am going to get a wok and a rice cooker to make stir fry and fried rice. I have a few questions though. One is about soy sauce. How do you keep it from burning? I read somewhere that you should add water and it will cause the water to cook away and the meat, noodles, and the like to soak up the sauce. Is this true? Also, can you use any old war meat. or are there set cuts of meat you need to use? Lastly, what seasoning do you like to use?

post #2 of 9

Flanks are good for stir fry , top round is good , deckles are good. The trick is cut it thin and on the bias. I dredge in cornstarch first then sauté.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #3 of 9

This will help you.

 

http://chinesefood.about.com/od/resourceschinesecooking/

 

Also this.

 

Google search Basics of Chinese cooking.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #4 of 9

If you're just cooking for one, skip the wok and special burner for now. A 10" or 12" non-stick pan will do as well at that level. If you get into it more, there are reasons to invest in the specialized equipment. But for starting for just one eater, it's not as important.

 

Do you have an Asian grocer reasonably close by? You'll have a much broader selection of ingredients and quality and lower prices. 

 

7-8 condiments will cover most of your needs, watch the video.

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #5 of 9

The most important thing I try to do when making a stir fry is to cook each vegetable separately.  Have all your veggies cut up and ready to go because once you start frying there's no time to do anything else.

 

I always start with the broccoli.  I put it in the wok with a shot glass of water and steam it for a minute first, then uncover and let the water dissipate.  Add a shot of neutral oil like grapeseed and stir fry quickly.  Remove.  Then I stir fry the carrots alone and remove.  Then the mushrooms alone and remove.  Then the peppers alone and remove.  Then the onions and remove.  Then the bok choy or any other leafy stuff. and remove.  Then I do the meat. After all that is done I fry up some garlic with the ginger and start adding condiments.   Cornnstarch, chicken stock, soy sauce, a little honey, a little rice vinegar, maybe some chilis if I'm feeling spicy.  When that cooks down I add a few drops of sesame oil and toss all the ingredients with the sauce and then it's done.  

 

One of my favorite things to make is fried rice.  You start off with steamed rice but make sure it has cooled down completely.  I do this by spreading it on a sheet pan to cool quickly.  I love lots of veggies in my fried rice so I dice up carrots and onions and all different colored peppers, scallions, mushrooms, peas, whatever I have in the fridge.  Toss in the rice and toast on all sides and add soy sauce.  Before I serve it I make a little well in the middle and crack in an egg or two, scramble it and stir in to the rice.  Perfect dinner.  Sometimes I start off with bacon, but my favorite meat addition is canadian bacon.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #6 of 9


Try blanching veges.,  in boiling water ,ice down until service then you can stir fry all together a lot easier. Do broccoli stems the longest with carrots

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #7 of 9

Woks are fun.  I had one years ago, until I rusted it out by soaking it in water.  Don't do that.  lol

 

You can cook most anything in a wok. I've even read somewhere, where you can make a cake in a wok.

 

I just caught the end of Simplyming, where he cooked a scallion pancake in a wok. Take a look around his site, and see what inspires you.

 

https://www.ming.com/simply-ming/episodes/season-9/episode-922-cooking-on-the-fly-wok-stirring.htm

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluttershiy View Post
 

Hello everyone! I am 23, I have always loved to cook and always loves "Asian food." But I have never cooked any. So I just made up my mind that I am going to get a wok and a rice cooker to make stir fry and fried rice. I have a few questions though.e a One is about soy sauce. How do you keep it from burning? I read somewhere that you should add water and it will cause the water to cook away and the meat, noodles, and the like to soak up the sauce. Is this true? Also, can you usny old war meat. or are there set cuts of meat you need to use? Lastly, what seasoning do you like to use?

The beauty of using a wok/stir-frying is, the food/ingredients are cooked quickly (moved around in a hot pan/wok) using very little oil. Use any protein of choice, i.e. beef, poultry, shrimp etc.).  Slice beef against the gran (thinly) and cut veggies into uniform size (so everything cooks evenly).  Have your mise en place - everything cleaned, chopped and ready to go -- as cooking will be quick.  Get your wok/pan hot, add about a tbl of oil. Cook your protein first, and veggies last - as you want  them crisp-tender.  Add your (sliced) protein to a bowl w/ a mixture/slurry of cornstarch/soy sauce/minced garlic/red pepper flakes - whatever you like. Let it sit for about 15 minutes. Add your protein to the hot oiled wok, stir-fry (pushing the food around.  When cooked, you can either remove it, or push it to the side and add your veggies.  Add a little more oil, if necessary. Nothing should burn.

 

One of my first little cookbooks was from Kikkoman.  Very simple and easy-to-follow recipes.  Their site offers many of the same recipes, and more.

 

http://www.kikkomanusa.com/foodservice/index.php

 

I tried their lemon and lime Ponzu sauces drizzled over dumplings, & really enjoyed them.  Have fun with your new wok.

 


Edited by Cerise - 3/15/15 at 11:53am
post #9 of 9

Oh, another thought :) My friend had given me a bamboo steamer, eons ago.  Didn't have time to play with it, but here's just one more idea --- steaming in your wok.

 

Example - Thai Steamed Fish

 

http://thaifood.about.com/od/thairecipesstepbystep/ss/thaisteamedfish_4.htm#step-heading

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking