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Anyone else messed with Shirataki noodles?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I recently went on a diet, and while I could have pasta.. I'm not trying to cut out carbs, traditional pasta tends to really rack up the calories. Poking around I found mention of Shirataki noodles, which in my opinion can only be described as very similar to the noodle texture you get from a pack of "ramen" noodles. Which makes them excel at Asian inspired dishes.

 

The crazy thing about it, is a serving is just 15 calories. I can fill a whole bowl with noodles and be eating 30 calories.. the only other nutritional element is fiber! They are flavorless, and are able to pick up the flavor of sauces well. I think they are pretty swell given all of that, plus they come in a bag of water so there isn't any cooking time involved really. Just plop into a colander, rinse, drain, and toss them into your pan.

 

Has anyone else discovered these? If you haven't I think they are worth checking out. If not for yourself, maybe for people that you know that have special dietary needs. They are typically found in your grocer where they have soy products. These are not soy though, they are made from an Asian root called the "devils tongue yam"

 

If you have.. what are your favorite ways to use them? So far I have only used them twice and both times in a similar approach, kind of a stir fry. I feel they would be awesome in an actual ramen soup. I am curious how they might react to being pan fried in a little oil.

post #2 of 7

Very interesting, thanks for sharing, I'd never heard of them. I'll try to see if I can find them at my Asian market!

post #3 of 7

I eat them all the time, being a diabetic i need to cut pasta out most of the time. They are packaged in a liquid that smells like bad shrimp, it has to be rinsed then you cook for three minutes, drain. These things wick up water like crazy, what I have found best is to lay out on paper towels and pat dry then give a drizzel of olive oil & grated parmesan (the stuff in the green shaker can)

 

They have no taste to speak of and they will not absorb liquid like regular pasta so whatever sauce you use needs to stand on it's own.

I have not used them in soup yet. They are just under $2 a pouch here and are with all the natural food and tree bark. Count on one pouch per hungry adult or two not so hungry.


Edited by chefbuba - 3/18/15 at 7:35am
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

I read about the smell issue, and have not encountered that at all. The brand I have available to me in my grocer is "Pasta Zero" by Nasoya. It's a little more expensive.. around $2.58 for a package. Maybe they have already somewhat treated it? They also make a fettuccine cut, but given that they are a little rubbery like ramen noodles, I'm not sure I'd like them to be bigger.

 

For anyone interested in what they look like in a dish, this is a nasty photo but I made this last night. Quick pork loin stir fry with snow peas, bamboo shoots, scallions, and shirataki noodles. The portion you see there, is just 30 calories for the noodles. Altogether with the tbsp of canola, pork, veges, 2 tbsp of stir fry sauce, and noodles this dish was 250 calories.

 

post #5 of 7
These are made from konjac, a gelling agent derived from a type of yam. If you have seen those cartoon octopus looking knot things in Asian markets, it's the same thing. Konjac is quickly becoming my go to gel, it's very powerful but virtually flavour less and quite flexible.
post #6 of 7

I heard of them a few years ago but the reviews of the smell turned me off.  I'd give it a try now.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post
 

I read about the smell issue, and have not encountered that at all. The brand I have available to me in my grocer is "Pasta Zero" by Nasoya. It's a little more expensive.. around $2.58 for a package. Maybe they have already somewhat treated it? They also make a fettuccine cut, but given that they are a little rubbery like ramen noodles, I'm not sure I'd like them to be bigger.

 

For anyone interested in what they look like in a dish, this is a nasty photo but I made this last night. Quick pork loin stir fry with snow peas, bamboo shoots, scallions, and shirataki noodles. The portion you see there, is just 30 calories for the noodles. Altogether with the tbsp of canola, pork, veges, 2 tbsp of stir fry sauce, and noodles this dish was 250 calories.

 

 

That looks quite good.  Yum.  Thanks eastshores.

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