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In a pickle about ribs...

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
A guy I work with was telling me about rubbing pickling spice on his ribs. (Pork i mean, not his actual ribs.) Anyone try this? Is it as amazing as he describes? Those portions of pig heaven are expensive, but I'd risk it for positive reviews.
post #2 of 19

I don't see why not.  I'm not too sure about the cinnamon but everything else would work.

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I don't see why not.  I'm not too sure about the cinnamon but everything else would work.
You completely hit the nail on the head. Once I read the ingredients of the spice I saw cinnamon and I'm picky about how what I put it in. That said, had some success using it in Korean BBQ sauce, chili. And beef pho.
post #4 of 19

I've developed a rub that I like based on the simple one we used back in the 70's.  I trimmed down a whole St Luis yesterday and just put the dry run on, wrapped in foil then baked for an hour @ 250, an hour @ 300 then slice the foil poured in a sauce I made and cranked the heat up to 400 for a while till caramelized and the bones wiggled.  I should do a photo WIP on how I break one down next time.  It's a process, but doesn't take that long + I threw the skirt in during the last hour so it's good to go for tacos Friday.  :thumb:

post #5 of 19

Cinnamon in small amounts is found in a lot of BBQ rub recipes...

post #6 of 19

There are pros and cons to using pre-mixed spices in rubs. 

 

Pro, it's easy, you often find functional combinations. One of the early barbecue rubs I liked used things like cajun seasoning, italian seasoning, Mrs Dash and so on. IMHO this method is at it's best when you are using your own premixed seasonings because you're using things already tuned to your taste and you're in control of the ingredients, though somewhat indirectly.   So your current pickling spice source has some cinnamon. Others don't and can you adapt to different pickling spice sources? Do you like the grade of ingredients they have selected or the ratio of them? Particlularly the salt in this case. 

 

Cons. You're not in control if you're using commercial spice blends. Different sources use different combinations and ratios of ingredients. Sometimes, the brand changes the mix and keeps the name the same. Or changes the size of the bottle. Consider recipes that say to add a bottle of salsa. How big is such a bottle?  Or one of my friends likes my italian seasoning blends. When he makes it he skips things that he doesn't have or won't source and wonders why it doesn't work out right. 

 

Currently I don't know my own recipe for barbecue rub. I make it by eye and mood so it varies some I'm sure. I do notice differences and like that because it matches my mood at the time. But few others have picked up on it. 

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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post

I've developed a rub that I like based on the simple one we used back in the 70's.  I trimmed down a whole St Luis yesterday and just put the dry run on, wrapped in foil then baked for an hour @ 250, an hour @ 300 then slice the foil poured in a sauce I made and cranked the heat up to 400 for a while till caramelized and the bones wiggled.  I should do a photo WIP on how I break one down next time.  It's a process, but doesn't take that long + I threw the skirt in during the last hour so it's good to go for tacos Friday.  thumb.gif

You should ALWAYS post photos or it never happened (;
Thanks for the tip!
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post

Cinnamon in small amounts is found in a lot of BBQ rub recipes...
Really? I've never worked with a rub, but I have never seen it listed as an ingredient in the bottled variety aside from Asian style.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

There are pros and cons to using pre-mixed spices in rubs. 

Pro, it's easy, you often find functional combinations. One of the early barbecue rubs I liked used things like cajun seasoning, italian seasoning, Mrs Dash and so on. IMHO this method is at it's best when you are using your own premixed seasonings because you're using things already tuned to your taste and you're in control of the ingredients, though somewhat indirectly.   So your current pickling spice source has some cinnamon. Others don't and can you adapt to different pickling spice sources? Do you like the grade of ingredients they have selected or the ratio of them? Particlularly the salt in this case. 

Cons. You're not in control if you're using commercial spice blends. Different sources use different combinations and ratios of ingredients. Sometimes, the brand changes the mix and keeps the name the same. Or changes the size of the bottle. Consider recipes that say to add a bottle of salsa. How big is such a bottle?  Or one of my friends likes my italian seasoning blends. When he makes it he skips things that he doesn't have or won't source and wonders why it doesn't work out right. 

Currently I don't know my own recipe for barbecue rub. I make it by eye and mood so it varies some I'm sure. I do notice differences and like that because it matches my mood at the time. But few others have picked up on it. 

The pickling spice idea was tossed out to me when we had ribs on sale, the spice on hand, and I was VERY hungry! It was an instant gratification thing, but I will defiantly entertain the idea if attempting my own as you suggested. In the end, I used my favorite bottle liquid sauce which I highly recommend if you don't mind a little heat. It is a tequila habanero base and unlike any other I've ever tasted. When I explore rubs further, I hope you are around to offer more opinions regarding combinations. New recipes are honestly very hit and miss with me
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper Grind View Post


You should ALWAYS post photos or it never happened (;
Thanks for the tip!

 

What I should be describing is breaking down a whole spare rib slab into a St. Louis style slab.  Here's a good video on the process only I take the tips out of the brisket and cook that with the skirt separate.  It's second nature to me as I used to trim cases and cases of ribs several times a week.  For anyone who hasn't done this just take your time and use a SHARP knife.  It's fun I guarantee.

 

post #11 of 19

Thanks for sharing that video @Mike9 , it answers a question I had 5 years ago about pork brisket bones, which are very unexpensive at my market. Love them. 

 

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/59283/accidental-tomato-braised-pork-brisket

 

PS: I would be curious to hear your rub recipe, if you don't mind sharing. 

post #12 of 19

@French Fries

 

This is my recipe when I cook for myself.  It evolved from a jamaican jerk recipe.  It's too spicy for competition, but I hate saucy sweet ribs.

 

2T sea salt

2T raw cane sugar

2T granulated garlic powder

1T onion powder

1T fennel seed (toasted, ground)

1T allspice

1T hungarian hot paprika

1T cayenne

1T chile de arbol (toasted,ground)

1T fresh ground black pepper

1/2t cinnamon


Put it all in a spice grinder to a fine powder.

 

Rub on the ribs, let them sit in the fridge on a cooling rack for at least 2 hours.  You want the surface to form a pellicle for good smoke adhesion.  Smoke at 275 until they pass the bend test, probably 5-5.5 hours.  If it gets too dark, I will wrap in parchment after 3 hours.  I call it 'en papillote' because that sounds less dirty than the texas crutch.

post #13 of 19

:lol:  @  "Texas Crutch" - never heard that one before.

 

Mine is fairly simple - I've been making it so long I just eyeball it, but maybe I'll measure it out sometime.  OK:

 

Paprika

Celery salt

Garlic powder

Onion powder

Black pepper

Cumin 

A pinch of cayenne 

 

I will add smoked paprika if/when I have it on hand

If it's going on the smoker I'll add brown sugar, but not if it's going to be grilled.

post #14 of 19

Very cool. BTW myself I've been doing (eyeballing as well): 

 

- Smoked paprika

- Cumin

- Onion powder

- Garlic powder

- Mustard powder

- Black pepper

 

From the recipes you shared I'll steal the ideas of using celery and fennel (maybe not together though), which I both have on hand. 

post #15 of 19

Quick google search, tons of recipes, that apple pie rib one looks interesting... https://www.google.com/search?q=cinnamon+BBQ+rub&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pepper Grind View Post


Really? I've never worked with a rub, but I have never seen it listed as an ingredient in the bottled variety aside from Asian style.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Very cool. BTW myself I've been doing (eyeballing as well): 

 

- Smoked paprika

- Cumin

- Onion powder

- Garlic powder

- Mustard powder

- Black pepper

 

From the recipes you shared I'll steal the ideas of using celery and fennel (maybe not together though), which I both have on hand. 

 

The celery salt really lends a good flavor.  If I add smoked salt I'll use less celery salt.

post #17 of 19

While I don't have celery salt, I have celery seeds, which I originally bought to try to rub on beef before grilling, but I don't think I'ever used it! Looks brand new. Smells just like celery. I will use it soon!

post #18 of 19

Celery salt is a critical ingredient for a proper Chicago dog, though I only buy them, don't make myself.

 

My rub recipe:

 

Hoosier Q Rib Rub as of 29-dec-05:

2 T sugar
2 T kosher salt
2 T paprika
1 T onion powder
1 T cumin
1 T dry mustard
1 T granulated garlic
1 T basil
1 T ground allspice
1 T Hot Shot pepper mix

 

 

At least that is what is written down, like others I often just eyeball. A lot of rub recipes you see on the net are quite heavy on the sugar, which helps with a good bark as it carmelizes, but I prefer to use a lot less. For the paprika I often used varying amounts of smoked, hot and sweet, depending on my mood at the time. The "Hot Shot" pepper mix is basically 50% ground black pepper and 50% cayenne. The ratios you like may be different. Sometimes I add more allspice to give a hint of the islands. Hopefully with my larger gardening area this year I can get more than 7 small habaneros and make many batches of jerk marinade.

 

mjb.

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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the recipes, everyone. I will probably just take little bits of your ingredients to match my preference until I come up with the most epic combination. If that happens, I will share.

Thanks again, and it's also nice to learn that my celery salt can be used for purposes other than stick on the rim of my Caesars.
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