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Pass the budder, please.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

http://www.bbcamerica.com/mind-the-gap/2012/11/06/food-and-drink-10-things-that-taste-different-in-the-u-s/

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #2 of 7

Not a bad article.  I would have to disagree with just a couple of points.  First of chocolate; now I agree that compared to lots of chocolate in Europe, our massed produced stuff is not that great, but I've eaten a number of British, mass produced chocolate treats, and IMHO that are not good at all.  Secondly, sausages;  the US has lots of awesome sausages.  Maybe the author needs to taste something other than the American "Italian" sausages that I assume he is refering to.  Living in Wisconsin, there is great sausage everywhere.  The same is true all throughout the Midwest, and in many parts of New England (and I'm sure other places but these are the places I know best).

 

I would definitely agree that mass produced, mass marketed cheese is a sad, pale comparison to the British stuff, but we also have lots and lots of great cheese to be had, just not always at large supermarkets.  I also agree that America seems to have a passion for highly hopped beer, a trend I can't get on board with, but we do have other really great beer, but I can't blame the author for his opinion on our beer.

 

And I would have to agree, wholeheartedly, about American butter, compared to the European stuff.

post #3 of 7

I agree with Pete.

 

I think the author did not look very hard to find that in America we continue to produce the very same cheeses, sausages, and chocolate that he describes. We have many artisanal brewers, chocolatiers, creameries, and bakeries that would compete just as good with anything made in Britain or France.

 

There was a thread a while ago that referred to a blind wine tasting with some of the best wine judges in Europe and France pitting American wines against other countries.

The American wines won over the others........

post #4 of 7

A few years ago I read of a blind wine competition and tasting at the California State Fair.where somebody entered a Two-Buck Chuck and it was declared the winner in its class and vintage, to the embarrassment of many and the amusement of quite a few!

 

I hope this is not one of those way-too-good-to-be-true anecdotes, but I don't know where to go to verify  it.

 

Appreciate some knowledgeable person checking it, or providing a reference  I'll ask a TJ's manager next time  I'm  in.

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #5 of 7

This is the second time I have read this.

The first reading got my dander up now I take it to be a tongue in cheek entertainment story.

Like most of the content of this site http://www.thrillist.com/ .

 

We (not the royal we....more of the I am an American and will compare our artisan products nose to nose with any out there and be sure to be in the top 3 if not #1 any day of the week we) have top notch products in every one of those 10 categories.

Do agree with @Pete tho...have not come across a butter that will compare with one of those fancy European brands.

I do have a fave brand that is made in Texas but will admit it lacks that certain something (maybe the hefty price tag lol?).

 

mimi


Edited by flipflopgirl - 4/25/15 at 9:10am
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

This is the second time I have read this.

The first reading got my dander up now I take it to be a tongue in cheek entertainment story.

Like most of the content of this site http://www.thrillist.com/ .

 

We (not the royal we....more of the I am an American and will compare our artisan products nose to nose with any out there and be sure to be in the top 3 if not #1 any day of the week we) have top notch products in every one of those 10 categories.

Do agree with @Pete tho...have not come across a butter that will compare with one of those fancy European brands.

I do have a fave brand that is made in Texas but will admit it lacks that certain something (maybe the hefty price tag lol?).

 

mimi

I haven't been in every country of Europe, but in my observations, there is a major distinction between those artisanal products made in the US and those found abroad. Price. They aren't "artisanal" in Europe. 

 

Anything in this country that is deemed artisanal or special comes with a hefty price tag, while normal cheese or bread found in Europe is everyday cheap and good. Sure, there are exceptional (pricey) products to be found everywhere, but in the good ole U S of A we create price points to make more money. It's the American way. It could be because I live in NYC, but even in other cities, artisanal usually comes with an increase in price. Just look at "organic." Economies of scale plays a role, but increased margins play a bigger one. Profits above quality. Those bringing to market hand made cheeses and artisanal products see the market ripe and are riding the wave. I am still flabbergasted that I can't get a decent baguette without paying $3 for it while in Europe I get very good bread for 1 Euro. Same with charcuterre or even wine. 

 

I also think that is changing, and Europe is turning more like the US in regard to economics and corporate control of markets /cheaply made mass produced foodstuffs. Seeing Micky D's in Europe packed with kids depresses me. 

 

end rant/

post #7 of 7

Years ago European cuisine was 10 times better then ours. Today I believe that the numbers have reversed. The only thing I say is still a bit better their is the service staff in the upscale places. Over their a waiter is a profession here  it is just  a job.(Oh yea their truffles are still better )

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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