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April 2015 Challenge: Seafood - Page 4

post #91 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

 

@teamfat you've inspired me to do something similar, well done!  How do you store the salmon after it's cured and for how long?

 

 

I store it in the fridge in a zippered plastic bag. Not sure how long it will actually keep. The batch size I make is gone in 2 - 3 days, maybe 4 at the most.

 

mjb.

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post #92 of 113

I invited my neigbours over yesterday and decided to do a fish dish, so finally got around to eating fish this month.

 

I fried some garlic, ginger, and chili's in some oil.

Then added a crushed stalk of lemon grass, some pieces of galangal, ground turmeric and coconut cream and water.

Brought it all to a boil and added tilapia fillets.

Simmered them till done, took them out of the pot. Added some fish sauce to the sauce and reduced it a bit.

Put the fish back in the frying pan and served it family style (everything in pots on the table for each to take as much/little as they wanted) with green peas and rice.

 

It turned out to be a lovely meal and a lovely evening as well.

 

Forgot to take pictures though .......

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post #93 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

 

@Antonella84 looks good, how did it turn out?

delicious :D but we ate it all before taking a picture XD

this one in the oven is the only I have

post #94 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by butzy View Post
 

I invited my neigbours over yesterday and decided to do a fish dish, so finally got around to eating fish this month.

 

I fried some garlic, ginger, and chili's in some oil.

Then added a crushed stalk of lemon grass, some pieces of galangal, ground turmeric and coconut cream and water.

Brought it all to a boil and added tilapia fillets.

Simmered them till done, took them out of the pot. Added some fish sauce to the sauce and reduced it a bit.

Put the fish back in the frying pan and served it family style (everything in pots on the table for each to take as much/little as they wanted) with green peas and rice.

 

It turned out to be a lovely meal and a lovely evening as well.

 

Forgot to take pictures though .......

That sounds delicious. And you just inspired me to make a Southern Thai-style chicken curry tomorrow night, I was wondering what we were going to cook! Thanks for the inspiration! :)

post #95 of 113

Shrimps in curry paste:

 

This time with pictures :peace:

 

I used 2 cubes of this paste.

It's a concoction I made for a quick spicy chicken noodle soup at the lodge and consists of Thai red curry paste, nam prik pao and coconut cream with extra spices (lime zest, lemongrass, ginger, garlic, coriander, black pepper and some extra chili's)

 

 

The onion, garlic and chili were marinated in a fish sauce- lime juice mix with a bit of palm sugar

 

I fried the 2 curry-cubes with garlic. Then added a bit of water to get the right consistency and added the finely shredded lime leave.

 

Then the shrimps

 

Served with the shrimp mixture sitting on top of the onion-fish sauce mixture and tomato and egg to the side.

Garnished with Basil leaves.

 

It would have been a lot better with proper prawns, but tasty not the less.

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post #96 of 113
Thread Starter 

@butzy I'm loving your dish, and major points for taking such care in the plating!

 

Come on everyone, only a couple of days left, surely someone's eating something out of the sea these days!  Even a tuna sandwich will do!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #97 of 113

I too am a bit surprised that we haven't seen more entries recently. How about the old classics like Oysters Rockefeller, Coquilles St. Jaques, various surf and turf plates, or one of my favorites, tournedos oscar - uh, wait a minute, if it is one of my favorites why didn't *I* offer it?

 

But I did manage something tonight, a fairly simple dish.

 

The Players

 

 

Obviously those are shrimp in the lower right, and above them a couple of eggs. The jars in the back contain hot chili paste, soy sauce and Chinese black vinegar. There's a block of firm tofu, some bamboo shoots and canned straw mushrooms. And if you are following along with the cutting board contest, I should review the one in the picture. It was made by Karen's younger sister back in high school shop class, maybe 35 years ago, and still a favorite of mine.

 

The Procedure

 

First off the shrimp are peeled and cleaned. Heads and shells went into about a quart of water along with one star anise pod, then simmered for about half an hour. While that was going on I sliced the bamboo shoots into thin toothpicks, cubed the tofu, cut the shrimp in half and beat the eggs pretty well.

 

 

 

Looks like the broth is ready to be strained. It was then put into another pot with the chili paste, bamboo shoots, soy sauce and black vinegar, simmered for about 10 minutes. Gave it a taste, added a bit more vinegar. Then the shrimp and tofu go in, cook for maybe 3 minutes. Looking like soup. The black vinegar gives it a different color than what you usually see in restaurants.

 

 

Off the heat, drizzle in the beaten egg. Into a bowl with some chopped green onion on top and enjoy!

 

The Product

 

Tasty.

 

 

And once again the family heirloom cutting board.

 

Good stuff.

 

mjb.

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post #98 of 113
Looking good @teamfat

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post #99 of 113
Thread Starter 

Looks tasty @teamfat , what is this dish called?

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post #100 of 113

@teamfat I really like the format of your posts. They really draw the reader in thanks for taking the time to do all that formatting.

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
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post #101 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post
 

@teamfat I really like the format of your posts. They really draw the reader in thanks for taking the time to do all that formatting.

 

I agree....

 @teamfat's recipe posts have a personality.

Fun to read.

 

mimi

post #102 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Looks tasty @teamfat , what is this dish called?

 

Went back and looked - I never did mention 'hot and sour soup' in my post. There are many variations, a lot of them vegetarian. This one with the shrimp is obviously not. Some call for minced pork or thin pork strips or chicken. I've not seen recipes using beef, though it is certainly doable.

 

mjb.

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post #103 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

 

I agree....

 @teamfat's recipe posts have a personality.

Fun to read.

 

mimi

 

Thanks for the compliments.  I get joy from cooking. When I share my cooking, I try to share that joy.

 

mjb.

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post #104 of 113
Would you like kippers for breakfast?

6b5c7dbe7a1ce7feecdb803fcb4285f4.jpg

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post #105 of 113

Nate:

I find it easy to first quarter a peeled avacado, then lay it flat on a cutting board, slicing slices but leaving the stem 1/2 inch intact. Then fanning out, leaves every thing neat.


Good Luck

Steve

post #106 of 113

Nani’s Cioppino or Cacciucco alla Livornese

 

Nani, a family friend, was an Italian doctor and former paratrooper and under water demolition expert for the Allied forces in World War Two.  He taught me and my sister how to snorkel and deep free dive. He was a tremendous success anytime he entered a kitchen. I first met him on the Isle of Giglio off the coast of Pisa, Italy in 1960.

 

This is an expensive dish and it takes a while to prepare. It is well worth it and your guest will beg you for it over and over, once they have tried it. Use this for a big crowd. Serve with two loaves of the finest sourdough bread you can find. You need a very big stock pot (12-14 quart or larger) for this dish. I do not prepare this often due to the cost. See notes below for more advice. The first time I had this I was only 14 but I remember this meal like it was yesterday as it ranks as one of the best I have ever had.

 

In Italy, the Cacciucco alla Livornese (in the USA Cioppino) is made with Slipper lobster, mantis shrimp, Moscardini (little octopuses), Baby Cuttlefish, mussels, large clawed ocean prawns and the catch of the day which could include the varieties: branzino (striped Sea Bass), Scorfano (Scorpion fish), Orata (Gilthead Sea bream), Gallinella (tub gurnard) Triglia (Red Fish) and Monkfish. Cioppino  is not unlike bouillabaisse, a French seafood stew, but it does not include saffron or fennel. Said to have its origins from “ciuppin"- a fish stew from the Liguria region of Italy and is very similar to Cacciucco Livornese. The word Cioppino is more identified with San Francisco where the Italian fisherman introduced it.

 

This recipe is a thicker version than the watery offering served in many “so called” Italian fish resturants in San Francisco, more like a sauce than a soup.  If you want more liquid, do not reduce the fish stock as much, or add additional white wine and chicken stock.

 

1 1/2 large onions, sweet, chopped

1/2 cup finely chopped celery

1/2 cup finely chopped carrot

1/2 pound finely diced salt pork

5 or more cloves garlic, chopped

1 tube triple concentrated Italian tomato paste

2 large cans of whole peeled San Marzano tomatoes

1 dry whole hot red pepper

3 Tablespoons chopped basil

1 Tablespoon chopped rosemary

1 Tablespoon chopped thyme

1 Tablespoon chopped sage

1 Tablespoon chopped oregano

2 Cups fish stock

6 Tablespoons extra virgin Olive Oil in two portions, 3 tablespoons each

16~25 clams

16~25 black mussels

8~16 large sea scallops

8~16 large prawns

8~12 ounces monkfish, boned

8~12 ounces red snapper, boned

1/4 pound sweet butter

2~4 lobster tails, cut up

2~3 Large steamed Dungeness crabs, bodies, cut into chunks

1 ½ cups white wine

2 tablespoons sweet butter

 

Fish Stock

2 cups dry white wine

1 quart of unsalted chicken stock

1 rock cod head

Assorted fish carcasses and bones

12 Coriander seeds

1 onion chopped coarsely or 2 whites of leek

2 ribs of celery, chopped coarsely

1 large carrot, chopped

10 dried Mexican bay leaves

10 peppercorns crushed

 

Garnish

Sprigs of fresh basil and chopped chives

 

 

Wash and rinse both the clams and mussels in cold water several times. Discard any dead or open clams or mussels. Cover them in a bowl with cold water, stir in a tablespoon of cornstarch. Set them on the counter for several hours untouched. The cornstarch will entice them to open, which may allow them to drop some sand and shed salt from the salted water they were raise in. Rewash in cold water before using.

 

Clean the cooked crab bodies. Discard small useless small leg joints, retain large leg pieces, crack these so their easier to eat, clean and cut up the crab main bodies into 4 main chunks per crab. You can have the butcher do this for you either for free or maybe an additional small incremental fee. Clean the lobster, cut off and retain the tail and large claws (if it has claws). Cut the lobster in half length wise. The cross cut the lobster tail meat into chunks. Remove and discard any loose shell bits. Place shellfish in the refrigerator until a half an hour before cooking. Now bring out shellfish and fish and allow them warm up some, a half an hour before the final cooking stage.

          

Fish Stock:

Prepare this 3-4 hours ahead of when it’s needed. Combine all fish stock ingredients in a large stockpot. Bring to a boil and cook on high covered for 5 minutes, remove lid, cook another 25 minutes. Cool, then strain first through a course sieve then again through a fine sieve. Discard all fish stock solids. Return all the liquid to the large stock pot, simmer on low, and reduce until half its volume. Next prepare tomato base.

 

Tomato Base:

Sauté onions, celery, carrots, salt pork and the red pepper in 3 tablespoons of your best olive oil on moderate heat in a sauce pan until onions are clear but do not brown. Add chopped spices. Add 5 cloves of chopped garlic; cook on high 1 minute. Add tomato paste and cook on high stirring constantly until the paste darkens which helps deepens its flavor. Stir in 1 cup white wine. Stir and cook uncovered on low for five minutes, then add chopped tomatoes. Simmer uncovered for 45 minutes. Add a ladle or two of fish stock as required as sauce thickens. Pour tomato base into the fish stock pot. If you are several hours ahead, cover stockpot and turn off heat.

 

To Finish the Cioppino:

Bring up heat under stock pot so it comes to a low boil.

 

Add 3 tablespoons olive oil and butter in a hot 12" skillet and add drained washed clams and mussels.  When the shellfish barely begin to open, deglaze with ½ cup white wine. Examine pan for sand from the shellfish. Strain pan to remove any sand. Taste the broth and note its salt content. If it super salty from the ocean salt water, you will need to add less salt to the cioppino later. Then add the filtered3 broth from the pan into the main stockpot.  Bring stock pot to a boil.

 

Add uncooked lobster pieces and cook 8 minutes with the lid on. (If you add the lobster whole (not recommended) they will take longer to cook, may cook unevenly, and be difficult to serve individual portions.) If you managed to find baby slipper lobsters, you may leave the tail shells on and cook them whole as long as they are 3 ounces or smaller.

 

(For more pronounced garlic taste, one could add more finely minced fresh garlic at this point.) Now add the crab, scallops and shrimp. Boil for exactly five minutes with the lid on then add all other fish into the liquid, boil for 4 minutes with the lid on. In the last two minutes, add back the clams and mussels pushing them into the stock. Turn off heat, leave lid on. Let the pot rest covered for five minutes. As the stock cools, fish will continue to cook. There is a lot of stored heat in the soup stock liquid. (Notice that the fish goes in whole which is ok as the process of serving and stirring the soup will break then fish up enough.)

 

Just before serving, check salt and add pepper to taste. 

 

Serving individual portions in a large soup bowl and garnish with a sprig of basil and finely chopped chives.

 

Notes:

  1. A word about the lobster.

Pacific spiny lobsters ($$$) or slipper lobsters are preferred over all others but Maine lobsters, if bought live are ok. If you are squeamish, have the butcher tail and claw them for you. Keep them on ice (do not freeze) until ½ hour before ready to cook, then bring to room temperature. If you place too many really cold things in the pot, the temperature will drop too much. We are timing things so we avoid overcooking items hence we allow things to warm up a bit just before cooking them, which is just fine.

  1. Controlling quality and cost.  You need a good fish market. (Asian markets have a good assortment and are less expensive.) Prepare fish from whole fresh fish. Use the carcass and bones for stock. Fresh fish have clear eyes, bright red gills, and smell like the sea.
  2. Filtering removes any possible sand dropped from the clams or mussels.
post #107 of 113
Thread Starter 
Great last entries! I'll announce a winner in the morning Eastern standard time so there is still time!!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #108 of 113
Thread Starter 

Time to announce the WINNER!

 

There were some really tasty dishes entered this month, not as many as I thought there would be but good stuff all around!  

 

There were the numerous paellas by @ordo @French Fries , @jake t buds and @Zeph Zpiteri

 

There were the smoked and cured fishes by @GeneMachine @Nate and @teamfat

 

The stews and chowders by @GeneMachine and @Joyo

 

Particular favorites were the dishes that prepared the seafood ever so simply so as to let the main ingredients shine through by @eastshores (boil!) @Iridium12

@antonella @ChefNick91 @petalsandcoco and so many others

 

A special word to those who are new to the forum.  I'm so happy to see so many new entries by very promising cooks such as @pbo2444 @Nate @Joyo @Iridium12 

@Zeph Zpiteri  @Antonella @Chefnick91  @kevp and @Steve TPHC  I am so impressed with your dishes.  Please keep entering these challenges and contribute to our forum regularly.  I hesitate to name any new member of the forum a challenge winner because the host of the challenge has to be around quite a lot during the month and our track record on the site with new members is that they come on for a few days of constant posting and then disappear.  And we want to see more from all of you.

 

Ok ok drumroll please... the winner is @Mike9 My mind kept going back to the spicy shrimp with corn custard entry, I keep imagining the flavors of this dish, it treads the line between being delicate and light vs. hearty and comforting.  Not too complicated but done with considerable skill and finesse.  Congrats Mike9, the torch has been passed.

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post #109 of 113

Thank you very much I'm honored - there were so many great entries in this one.  I've looked over the previous challenges and I think I have something in mind - I will post it later.  

post #110 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Time to announce the WINNER!

 

 

 

Ok ok drumroll please... the winner is @Mike9 My mind kept going back to the spicy shrimp with corn custard entry, I keep imagining the flavors of this dish, it treads the line between being delicate and light vs. hearty and comforting.  Not too complicated but done with considerable skill and finesse.  Congrats Mike9, the torch has been passed.

 

Excellent choice! That was one of my top three picks for the month. Good Work Mike!

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post #111 of 113
Congratulations Mike!
Nice entry indeed

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post #112 of 113

Well deserved! Congrats!

post #113 of 113

Congrats Mike!!!

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