or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Classic stock recipes .

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Classic stock recipes suggests up to a few hours cooking time depending on what type it is.

 

What are your opinions of my method ?

 

Vegetable stock : Bring to boil ( to soften the veg ), blend , bring back to boil and put through a fine strainer. Approx 20 minutes total.

 

Meat stocks : Same as above but using boneless meat trimmings. And reboiling for 20 minutes.

 

Question ? Do we extract the maximum flavor when we follow classic recipes? Surely we don't get all the flavour from the vegetables if they are roughly chopped mirepoix ?

 

I do not see where the flavor comes from a piece of bone , unless there is some meat left on.

post #2 of 5

There is a ton of flavor in the bones especially roasted. The blood is in the bones, marrow and gelatin. If there wasn't flavor in the bones dogs would not love them so much (ha ha). As for the vegetables I think you get all of their flavor when you simmer them for 3 hours or more. 

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #3 of 5
Of course bones have flavor. All the connective joints and such add body in the form of gelatin once simmered long enough to extract it, that's why classically a chicken stock may call to be simmered 4-6 hours or a veal stock 6-12 hours. If you're only simmering bones for 40 mins like you say you're voiding the whole point, no gelatin or flavor can be extracted from something as dense as bone in that short amount of time. Bones have tons of flavor, I rarely add meat trim to stocks unless they're not being utilized for anything. As for roughly chopped mirepoix not adding flavor I have no idea what you're talking about, perhaps you could clarify? The shape ir size makes no difference so long as you're simmering long enough to extract their flavor fully and no longer, and again this is dependent on their size to begin with. For example I might add a whole peeled bulk carrot to veal stock and simmer for 8 hours but for a chicken stock I might make a 2.5 inch chop and simmer for 3 hours. For a court bouillon I might make 1/8 inch rondelles and simmer for 20 minutes. I really suggest you read up on the basics of stock preparation because you really seem to be misunderstanding the methods used in making them.
post #4 of 5
McGee says you can simmer bones with some benefit up to 36 hours. If memory serves there's some note about decocting about 80% of what's available after 24 hours of simmering. Not sure if/how roasting would affect this.

I strain out veg and meat after an hour roughly, I don't like cloudy stock even at home..
post #5 of 5

Roasting the meat and bones brings out more depth of flavor and adds a richer color to a stock. Bone and marrow are very important in my opinion for two reasons.... they are less expensive them flesh...and they impart qualities to a stock that flesh alone cannot. Gelatin from marrow adds mouth feel that you cannot achieve by just using flesh. I am a HUGE proponent of adding in chicken or duck feet to all stocks to bump up the gelatin. I want that stock to giggle! 

 

20 minutes is not enough in my opinion...even for veggi stock. I would go at least an hour for veggie stock. Meat stocks..... at least 12, but i prefer about 36.

 

I prefer whole roasted veggies as they are much easier to strain out.

 

If you have the time.... i wrap the bones in several layers of dense cheesecloth..... I know that is more work and trouble but it cuts down on the impurities.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs