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Everything you'd put in a Tarte Tatin

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I'm at present in love with Tarte Tatin and thinking about any possible option for making it-I mean both the type of fruit and the things you can serve with it (sauces and so on, if it does make sense).
Apart from the most obvious apples, pears, peaches and apricots (BTW, I read in another thread about an apricot/almond paste TT, sound interesting, could you give me the recipe?), which other fruits could you suggest? I thought about plum and pineapple, and have heard about a recipe with persimmon...but I'm a bit doubtful about that as it seems to me too soft and watery.
Any good advice is very welcome!
BTW...the recipe I use for the pastry is the following:
For a 11 inch tarte: 7 oz wheat flour, 5 oz butter, 1 medium size egg, a pinch of salt. Do you agree?

TIA!

Pongi
post #2 of 27
I love apple tatins! But I think pinapple would work as well or better - the slight tartness caramelized, oh, oh.

I googled up a couple savory tatins. That would be a twist. Actually, the first, a tomato would probably respond to treating it as a fruit for a sweet tatin, too.

In my own (amateur) experience, I would say, enough butter, enough caramelization and anything tastes good. I also find that most fruit and many veggies benefit from a dusting of lemon zest. (one of my secret ingredients)

I googled this tomato tatin up. I don't think I'd use this recipe as is. I'd use my own pate brise,scatter some lemon zest on, etc. : http://www.artculinaire.ch/recettes/...ent3_0901.php4

This mushroom tatin is from Patricia Wells. I plan to try this one! : http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,...735677,00.html
" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
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" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
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post #3 of 27
Funny Alexia.

Last week-end I were in my husband's village on the mountains where they produce an excellent variety of apples, so we made 2 tartes tatin. But it has been very rainy lately , so we went to pick mushrooms in the woods.
Since I were under...tatin influence, I made the tarte without knowing this variation of the tarte tatin recipe!
I didn't use walnuts. Walnuts add a very heavy taste anyway and I don't think that I will ever use them. But the terte was delicious!
It need to be cooked well though, otherwise the taste is still heavy!
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #4 of 27
Athenaeus, I think you're right about the walnuts not being the right touch. The earthiness of the mushrooms can use something more contrasting than walnuts which are to my taste earthy, too. Do you think a little lemon peel? Shallots? How did you make your tatin?

One of my favorite quick meals is mushrooms in a cream sauce over toast points! (Hmm, maybe tonight, this RAINY, dreary night.) I do them with shallots, a little sherry or madiera, and finish with cream. OMG. So simple, so delicious.
" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
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" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
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post #5 of 27
If you're looking for unusual:

a fig tatin served with magret de canard (duck breast) or duck confit.
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #6 of 27
I'll have a flambeed banana tarte, with coconut and chocolate shavings. And a shot of chocolate liqueur.
post #7 of 27
So call me a purist,

But for me........anything other than apple is not a TT.

The sugar and starch balance in "cooking" apples is just perfect.

I love plums also,but prepared as a cloflutie (sp?).

Persimmon TT? can't see it....but I love it as a pudding or with game.

Pears have to be a bit under ripe to hold up properly,so lower sugar and higher starch.

I say "stick with apples" and a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream. Or,forget the ice cream and have a Vin Santo or Barsac :)
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #8 of 27
All this tatin talk -- I'm making one tomorrow. Pulled some dough out of the freezer to defrost; bought some local Staymans all red with green at the ends. They look like something from a 19th century still life. It's odd how people prefer perfectly manufactured looking fruit, all the same size, the same color.

Thanks for bringing up the subject, Pongi.
" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
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" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
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post #9 of 27
I agree with CC. It's not a tarte tatin if it's not done in the traditional way. If you use another fruit with the same method, it can't be called tarte tatin. But I think it still can be interesting and tasty.

:lips:
post #10 of 27
Of course you are right! Tarte Tatin is only one!
May the right term would be tarte a tatin... or whatever.

Alexia, I used fesh butter , a tbs of duck fat ( :rolleyes: ) and grated kefalotyri ( greek cheese very similar to parmesan). Oh I also added a lot of pepper!

I hoped that cape chef would read the thread and make a suggestion... :)
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
Reply
post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
:) Thanks everyone!

CC, you're right as usual, the true TT is made of apples and I should have talked about "tatin-like tarts".
I must say, however, that I love the pear TLT even more than the original one, and don't think there are problems in holding up properly if you use pears suitable for cooking like Martin Secs.

As for Clafoutis...I could say the same thing, since the True One is made, as you surely know, exclusively with cherries ;)

Kimmie, your idea sounds very interesting! I've just got a recipe of magret de canard with a caramelized Porto sauce that should go well with a fig TLT...

Thanks Alexia for the links...unfortunately my PC refused to open the second one, so I remain unaware of the mushroom Tatin:(

Pongi
post #12 of 27
Jacques Pépin adds dried fruits and nuts to his tarte Tatin. I'm not crazy about the idea. In fact it must be a sin. I'm all for using the Tatin principle to create other dessert but if it's the real thing it has to be authentic.


If you decided to make a tomato Tatin, under each tomato halves, hide a roasted garlic clove. It's heavenly.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #13 of 27
Go for it even if you have to give it another name ;)
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #14 of 27
With apologies to Cape CHef, Jamie Oliver made and Apricot and Pistachio Tart Tatin that looked rather edible.
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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post #15 of 27
There are some descriptions on Tarte Tatin which I can't read exactly in this page, because it's in French.
But I believe it revealed peaches and pears can be used in this dessert.....:confused:
post #16 of 27
Here's the English version of your page

The recipe is here
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #17 of 27
Thanks Kimmie!
post #18 of 27
Apricot Pistachio Tart Tatin, that sounds wonderful I'll have to look up the recipe.



In The Art of the Tart another Brit, Tamsin Day-Lewis, makes an Apricot Tatin replaing the fruits kernel by a small ball of almond paste. A very good mix.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #19 of 27
Does anyone have a tip on how to remove the kernel from the pit? I've tried the hammer which works but sometimes does in the kernel, too.
" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
Reply
" ...but in the spirit of 'stop, think, there must be a harder way, 'I figured starting from scratch might be more gratifying.'' (Judy Rodgers)
Reply
post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 
Isa,
I have already asked for that recipe by Tamasin Day-Lewis, if you got it could you share it? Sounds VERY interesting!
TIA,

Pongi
post #21 of 27
I'm sorry I never got you the recipe Pongi. Next time if I forget to give you, or anyone else, a recipe send me a message to remind me.

Enjoy!


A Tatin of Apricots Stuffed With Almond Paste


6 tablespoons sugar
1/4 cup ground almonds
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
2 tablespoons vanilla sugar
1 egg
a few drops of bitter almond extract
2-3 dozen fresh apricots


Make your pie dough with 1 1/2 cups flour, 6 tablespoons unsalted butter and 2 to 2 1/2 tablespoons cold water or cream then chill.

Preheat the oven to 350°F and roll the dough a little larger than the ovenproof skillet. Caramelise the sugar in the same pan in which the tart is to be cooked.


Mix the ground almonds, butter and vanilla sugar with the egg and a few drops of almond extract to make a rich paste. Slice each apricot in half, remove the pits, and then fill the cut halves with the paste. Pack the apricots tighthly into the pan, paste side up, in circles, with any left over in a double layer at the centre. Tuck a blanket of dough under the edges in the usual way, and bake for 35 minutes. Let it rest for 10 minutes before inverting and serving with crème fraîche.


P.S. I found her almond paste to be a bit runny and added enough almond powder to make it hold its shape better. This tart is really best when eaten the day it is made.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks Isa!
I have only another question for you. Every time I made an apricot tart I found out they were too watery and the tart resulted too moist. So, I use to bake them partially in advance and discard the liquid (I usually mix it with some gelatin and brush the tart). On the other side, when I make a Tatin I generally caramelize the fruits together with the sugar, then cover with the pie dough and bake everything.
I noticed that in this recipe you put the tart into the oven when the apricots are still raw. Don't they throw out too much water during cooking, also considering that the suggested cooking time is relatively short (I usually bake a Tatin 45-50 mins)?

Thanks again,

Pongi
post #23 of 27

Call this one sheer pleasure...

Imagine shallots caramelized in Tarte-Tatin form served with a filet of half-smoked/half-baked Arctic char. The fish would be absolutely fresh, and its gentle smokiness would be enhanced with a veal and elderberry sauce.

:lips:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #24 of 27
Sorry Pongi I had written my reply when my pc decided to crash, that explains the delay... I'm just really really upset that I lost my bookmarks. How am I ever gonna replace them all now. :mad:


I looked at the book again, and realised she doesn't cook any of the fruits for the tarte tatin on top of the stove. Very strange if you ask me.


I do remember I cooked the apricots on top of the stove before putting the whole thing in the oven. I'm sorry I don't recall how long I cooked them for adding the crust.


I hope this help. If you need more information just let me know I'll do my best to help you.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks again Isa!
As for the stove cooking time, I never care about it - when the caramel is golden, it's done.

Kimmie: I just imagine sometimes a baby onion Tatin to be served with foie gras (or magret de canard?) and an apple sauce (if this doesn't sound like a nonsense to a pro like you...)

Pongi
post #26 of 27
Isa; on your "A Tatin of Apricots Stuffed With Almond Paste" can I just use almond paste, straight as it comes packaged, or would you suggest I add the butter and egg?
Thanks
You Need Degas to Make De Van Gogh
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You Need Degas to Make De Van Gogh
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post #27 of 27
I used regular almond paste myself Oli and it worked out fine. Just make sure the almond paste is quite dry otherwise it may melt a bit while baking.



That sounds good to me Pongi! For the sauce may I suggest using ice cidre. :lips:
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
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