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Small immersion blenders suitable for professional use?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Have seen a number of these in toolkits and I think I can start to see the utility in having one of my own. My main concern is that they tend not to stand up to the abuse of a professional kitchen and I don't want to sink $$$ into something I'll be replacing in a matter of months.

Anyone know of a good brand of model that is well made ? Amazon has a nice looking Breville for 70 dollars CAD and I have used a few other Breville small appliances which seemed to be fairly well made. Good buy? Bad buy? It seems to be the most popular on amazon in that category. The motor is 280w, and as far as I can tell blenders in this size seem to max out at 400 (those being about twice as much as the breville and by what I would consider to be less reputable brands but I'm not an owner of small appliances)

 

 


Thanks friends. smile.gif 

post #2 of 10

I brought my personal Cuisinart immersion blender with variable speed knob to work (not just hi-lo buttons but 1-9 knob, $50 roughly). I remember reading the manual when I first got it that it should not be used for more than 60 seconds at once.

 

We put it to some use and we could smell a burnt smell after it did some work. No damage, but just became kind of wary with it.

 

However, my kitchen just got a new toy -- a smaller robo coup immersion blender. Before that we only had the big ass one that weighed like 50 lbs.

 

Ultimately it's up to you. If you and the staff are wary about not overusing it, you'll probably be fine.


Great for frittatas and thinner mixtures, not great for thicker sauces and endurance mixtures. Whip attachment is alright, sometimes it makes a huge fcking mess and sometimes it doesn't.

post #3 of 10

I have found this to be an excellent hand blender. Easy to clean, very powerful and the price is reasonable. 

 

 

 

However if I were going for one in a pro kitchen more watts is better in my opinion and for about the same money you get a whole lot more power.

 

 

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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post #4 of 10

It depends on what are you going to use it for. If you are going to be crushing crab and lobster shells forget about it, you need one of those heavy duty Dynamic blenders, but if you are going to be careful and use it for selected small jobs it will work. I have done it in the past and as long as everybody understands what is it used for it should be OK. But it takes only one muppet to brake it......

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie007 View Post
 

It depends on what are you going to use it for. If you are going to be crushing crab and lobster shells forget about it, you need one of those heavy duty Dynamic blenders, but if you are going to be careful and use it for selected small jobs it will work. I have done it in the past and as long as everybody understands what is it used for it should be OK. But it takes only one muppet to brake it......

 

Pretty much what I was thinking.  Puree a gallon of root veg. soup?  Sure.

post #6 of 10
Look the kmix hb891 by kenwood
post #7 of 10
I have been useing robotcoupe for 30 plus years with no issues.
post #8 of 10

I have used various "consumer" grade immersion blenders in restaurant kitchens for years.  Most have held up quite well-lasting a couple of years.  Granted they didn't see constant use as we also had a robotcoup and/or the large, heavy duty " immersion blenders-you know the ones, the ones that can power a small boat.  But used for their intended purposes, as others have said, they can last quite a long time and are worth the less $100 you spend on them.

post #9 of 10

I have a very old... probably 5 year old... Braun immersion blender.  As a Pastry Chef, I use it a lot and it has only now started to wear down... probably because I dropped it on the floor.  It still works fine, but I did move the inner workings around inside a little, so the button works only if pressed in a specific way.  Anyways... I am able to do pastry creams, ganaches, coulis and even thicker substances like batters.  I use it at least 5 times a day and sometimes for extended periods of time.  Spending even a hundred dollars on something that has proven to be so reliable and useful is a no brainer.  Get one... but don't just go with one because of a name.  A colleague bought a kitchen aid... and it was almost useless because of the blade placement.  It was too far down on the "drive shaft".  Look for one where the blade is closer to the body itself.   

"Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers"
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"Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers"
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post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the answers guys. I'm going to try out the Breville as the Braun 600w that nicko suggested is for european use only frown.gif (although we do have those type of outlets at work).
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