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The best chef's knives

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Simple, just what dou you guys think the best kitchen knives. Mention it specifically please
(Ex: Wusthof Classic Ikon 7-inch santoku ) and the plus minus / advantages disadvantages

post #2 of 5
Not a simple question. Read a few threads here and clarify your needs and goals.
post #3 of 5

Ahahaha, the concept of an infomercial was brought up recently and, In, that in fact is actually what you are suggesting we make of this post.


But since I have an Ikon, the 9" slicer, I'll say something about it.  The fit and finish is very good but the handle is way heavier than it should be, the grind is acceptable, but the steel is at the low-end of the spectrum.  For the same $80 I paid for it or less you could get a Fujiwara FKM or Tojiro DP, both superior and both considered merely entry-level Japanese knives.


So do as Brian suggested, and then restate your question when you have a better idea of what you are really looking to find out.




post #4 of 5

Immanuelnoah, welcome to ChefTalk!


Since this in response to your first (and so far) only post, I will start by observing that your profile shows you were on line earlier today.  So, I'm presuming you are still interested in the subject.


These threads are a dialogue. You posted a question, the rest of us chime in and then there's back and forth discussion. It's not “One Question and I'm Done”.


You're a culinary student who's asking about the “best kitchen knife”.I'm going to make several broad possible assumptions about the question.


First Possibility: You're asking about what's the ultimate chef's knife (because you think there's a golden knife out there which magically transforms all who use it into “Wonder Chef”).


Second Possibility: You're asking because some instructor wants you to compile a list of ultimate chef's knives.


Third Possibility: You're asking about what's the best knife FOR YOU as a culinary student.


For all practical purposes, the First and Second Possibilities are an irrelevancy to much of this forum and are a distraction to many of us. Wonder Chef's Knife doesn't really exist, and I, for one, don't want to do the heavy research just so you can submit my work for your school class credit. It's just too vast a question and I don't get paid for this and I have better things to do with my time and effort.


Only the third possibility makes any level of sense.


BrianShaw has it right – we need to know more about you.


What you are using now? (is it the Wusthof Ikon santuko?) Do you have a regular chef's knife? Describe it in terms of brand, model, length, etc.


What kind of paring knife or knives do you have? (length, style and brand/model)


What kind of bread knife do you have? (length, brand and model)


Do you have a boning knife? If so, what brand/model, length, style and flexibility?


Are you in the United State, or somewhere else? (This isn't a trick question. There are a lot of inquiries from many different countries around the world, but knife availability is mostly determined by the country where someone lives. Most of us take seriously the idea of making recommendations which are actually practical to the Original Poster. It's no good recommending a knife which you can't acquire).


What are your current sharpening processes?


What is your budget? What currency? (Again, about where you live). Is there VAT that affects your budget, and that we need to keep in mind?


Now, for a quick answer to your question about the best chef's knife.


(Drum Roll here)


It is …...



to be continued in my next post.........

post #5 of 5

continued from my last post in this thread




Now that the suspense has built, the real answer is




The chef's knife that you can personally keep sharp.


I'll bet that disappoints you. No big secret name or whatnot.


But it's the truth. It's learning how to sharpen and then keeping your knives sharp yourself that's the real “ultimate knife” solution.


All knives in use get dull. There's never been a knife that was used that didn't dull because of that use. The only way to keep a sharp knife sharp without working to keep it sharp is to never use it.


That's not to say that any knife will be just as good as any other knife. No siree. Some knives sharpen very easily and keep that sharpness for a long time. Other knives take a lot of work to get to their (not very) highest sharpness level and lose that sharpness very quickly.


Much of what we talk about isn't just about how to find the sharpest knife. Much of it has to do with how well a knife will resist dulling and how we can re-sharpen the knife.


But, unless you develop knife sharpening skills (mostly with water stones), that ultimate knife will only be a pipe dream, and will very quickly become just another semi-dull object in the drawer of dreams.


Please respond, so we can have a real dialogue.



Galley Swiller

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