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homemade miso and homemade koji

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

We produce a number of legumes here at the farm and soybean being one of them. I love miso, specially high quality miso. As usual the best way to get what you want is to do it yourself. Has anyone or does anyone currently make homemade miso paste? I am looking to make it from soybean, chickpea, and red bean. Tips, advice, and anything else would be helpful, hopefully there are people around here that like to tinker with food on this level. 

 

I would also like to produce my own Koji, curious if anyone is familiar with that process as well. 

post #2 of 7

To be clear I have not made my own miso (yet).  Any fermentation is of interest to me and I have read about this subject.

From what I gather making your own Koji is not straightforward i.e. coaxing the right microorganism to strive is not easy without microbiology equipment or risky trial and error.  I would suggest purchasing koji and propagate it at home.

 

there are many references for miso on the web.  I found this one helpful:

http://www.superfoods-for-superhealth.com/homemade-miso-recipe.html

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

i have been using these as a reference and for keeping me inspired to make the koji, i plan on making a lot of miso and to buy that much koji doesn't seem worth it. thanks for that link i believe i have stumbled upon it myself.

 

http://www.misorecipes.net/miso-articles/category/koji-making/

 

https://timogarden.wordpress.com/how-to-make-koji/

post #4 of 7

when saying you wanted to make your own Koji, I thought your intent was to make/create your own wild culture of Aspergillus oryzea.

If your intention is to inoculate your Koji using tane koji powder then that is a safer project.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspergillus_oryzae

 

Good luck!

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

yes i was going to use the koji kin on this website. best i could find. its not easy getting this stuff. though one point of this thread is to open my eyes to other options if they exist.

 

http://store.organic-cultures.com/kokinspsu.html

 

i have a korean friend who knows all traditional korean cooking, she says there is this stuff like miso cant remember the name, but its started with a wild culture on barley grass, if we get around to it i might try that with her aid, as i have lots of fresh organic barley straw from my field.

post #6 of 7

My real concern for you is if any wild culture you may create gets contaminated by Aspergillus flavus a toxin (aflatoxin) making cousin of Aspergillus oryzea (or another toxic microbes).  Making wild fungal cultures is difficult to get right without microbiology equipment to identify and weed out risky microbes.

Historically (probably) many people fell ill or died after consuming fermented legumes (miso and the like) because of toxin making strains contaminating the brew. The miso maker that didn't kill his customers got more business i.e. testing on humans. After many generations, food safe microorganisms get domesticated because they become prevalent/dominant in the surrounding environment.  With trial and error (sickness and death) domesticated strains can be propagated indefinitely in the same area/location.  This partly explains the term terroir in cheese making where a cave will easily make a type of cheese consistently because the walls are encrusted with a domesticated strain of microorganisms which invade the fresh cheese stored inside but cannot be reproduced anywhere else.  Traditional miso is/was made in the same old buildings which gives the same safe results. Starting from scratch is (potentially) risky because the difference between friend and foe is slim with fungus. Yeast and lactobacilli on the other hand is prevalent in the environment which explains why sour dough cultures are easy to make.

Just my take and words of caution.

 

Again good luck!

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the word of caution, i am cautious about her traditional skills on one hand. I didn't say i was going to eat her miso for sure, i would just like to learn how, as her and her family have been doing it for many many generations. That said I have also seen her eat things that would make most people in this country really sick. I totally understand your point and appreciate your detailed post. I would say most people don't think of food in those ways. This is why i was very cautious and still am when making my cured meats. 

 

I am most likely going to use the methods in the two links above. and the culture in the last link. i have temperature and humidity controlled areas for things like this. easy to clean as well.

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