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Rib Eye Steak - Page 2

post #31 of 38
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To wrap this up, I grilled the steaks since the grill, although far less than ideal, was good enough. Did first side really hot and lowered temp after turning. Did them med rare to med, as per diners preference, still red but no fleshiness.  

I salted and peppered them before leaving my kitchen, patted them dry again about an hour later (although there was very little moisture on the surface).

The steaks were black angus, 1 1/2 " thick and room temp before going on.   

I sliced them before plating. 

They were not at all tough, very tasty, and everyone loved them, including the restaurant owner and myself!

post #32 of 38

Success! Good to hear. Congratulations. :)

post #33 of 38
Quote:
I have a terrible ventilation system so I never sear steaks indoors.

 

I have the same problem.  Luckily I am not opposed to grilling out in the middle of a cold Wisconsin winter, but occasionally I do like a pan seared steak and when I do all the doors and windows get opened, even in the middle of winter, because I'm about to smoke out everyone in the house!!!!!

 

Quote:
It's not as tender, I'll give you that.

 

It drives me nuts most people use tenderness as the "end all-be all" of steak quality.  Sure a steak has to be tender-at least tender enough to cut and chew easily, but it has to be combination of tenderness and flavor.  That's why I think filet is so over rated.  Sure it's tender, but it also lacks an real depth of flavor.  Give me a ribeye, a New York or a sirloin any day of a filet.  As to grass fed beef, sure it is not as tender as grain fed beef and if overcooked will end up being much drier than grain fed, but grass fed beef is loaded with a lot more flavor.  There are many people that don't care for the flavor of grass fed beef as they claim it tastes to gamey, but to me that is what makes grass fed beef a better choice than grain-fed, generally.

post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

 

Not just healthier, but healthier for the cow too.  After all, a cow is born to eat grass.  A cow cannot digest corn, it was never meant to eat corn.  It's unnatural.  Our taste buds adapt to what we are fed.  

 

Umm, corn is grass. All our grains are grasses. And yes, cattle can digest corn. That's why they have 4 stomachs and chew cud. It's not necessarily ideal for them, but they can digest it.  While Michael Pollan says "cows did not evolve to digest corn", he goes on to explain that it's more the wrong ratios of nutrients. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/meat/interviews/pollan.html

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #35 of 38

Cows evolved to eat corn the same way humans evolved to eat cheetos.  While there's some wiggle room in what we can indulge in, our bodies perform best when they're eating a nutrient dense diet and stay away from too many processed foods.  Cows are not human but they are creatures of the earth and they too have an optimal diet.  Studies show that when animals are fed their optimal diet their meat offers more nutrients to those who eat it as well.  I'm not trying to get into any debate about grassfed over corn fed because I eat plenty of corn fed beef, it's cheaper and easier to find.  If I could afford it I would buy more grassfed beef for sure.  It's not so easy to find, I have to go to Fairway to get it and there is a small selection of it.  And because it doesn't move as well as the less expensive meat I fear sometimes it sits too long or meets a freezer more than once.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #36 of 38

We're agreeing on that. Just not on "a cow cannot digest corn" because they do. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #37 of 38

I only buy grass fed beef, grocery store beef is nasty... mine is direct from the farmer and plenty tender and full of flavor.

post #38 of 38

Can't remember exactly but I believe the problem with cows and too much grain is that the grain in large quantities damages their gut, causing lesions and subsequent infections, and requiring antibiotics to counter.  The latter is not exactly the best for us humans who consume these animals, along with the mycotoxins the bacteria produce, and all the growth hormone to boot.  I still eat the stuff, but if I had developing young children to feed I might consider feeding them something without the added hormones and antibiotics.  Ditto folks with serious chronic conditions.

 

But as an relatively occasional thing, heck why not.  I certainly wouldn't have encouraged anyone to pass up Becky's dinner.

 

 

Rick

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