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Winter seasonal/ cruise ship work

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

This is going to seem like a weird question, but I'm wondering if any of you know of any winter seasonal work? I've landed a nice gig in Alaska from late April-early August, and I would like to work for a couple of months in the winter as well and spend the rest of my time traveling and staging while I'm young and I can. 

 

My first thought was maybe a cruise ship, I've heard thy run 12 week contracts, but how willing are they to take someone on for 1 contract a year? Any other thoughts or ideals?

 

Thanks in advance guys

post #2 of 6

Congrats on the cruise ship job!  How many passengers on the ship? I worked on one that went up and down the mississippi river and held 420ish guests. We worked 12hours on 12 off for 6 weeks,no days off, no where to run on that small ship. 6 weeks on then 6 to 14 days off. My advice, make friends in other departments quickly and hang out with them. You'll see enough of the galley staff while you are on duty.

Hiding out will be a bit easier with the entertainers or housekeepers. Plus you will have different backgrounds and experiences to share.

 

To answer your question, Apply to work at a stadium. They would probably love to have someone of your cruise ship experience when you are finished. Try to start making contact middle to end of july. Be honest and upfront with them, there is plenty of work to go around,they are always looking for part-time workers. Take what you can get to get your foot in the door. If you are good at your job they will quickly figure that out and move you somewhere better suited for your abilities. Major Race tracks are good for one weekend of working your ass off which you might be tired of doing by the time your ship experience is finished. Start thinking about where you want to live now and watch for craiglist ads in that local market. You never know when your job aboard the cruise ship is going south (figuratively) because they just had to fire a bunch of people and now everybody else has to pick up the slack or whatever else may happen. 

You may make friends with people aboard the ship and all want to live together and hang out off the ship. Be open to whatever oppotunity life presents you with.

 

Maybe you want to see more cool scenery and work in a national park? Do you already have your passport, Maybe you want to spend your winter months on a us virgin island. Your already packed up and living out of a suitcase, put your toes in the sand for thanksgiving and xmas holidays. You may be away from your family but it may be worth a shot to try it once during your life. Keep in touch and let us know what you decide. Cheers!

post #3 of 6

Don't know if companys take hourly contract employees for 1 full year. I would be cautious with signing.

6 months is a long time(when you have to move to a new place when its a bit remote and you are finding your own living quarters in a new area or doing employee housing), but doable. Do your research on your new area, map out where you will go to grocery shop or eat fast-food, or even shower or wash your clothes.

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kmanholla8 View Post
 

Congrats on the cruise ship job!  How many passengers on the ship? I worked on one that went up and down the mississippi river and held 420ish guests. We worked 12hours on 12 off for 6 weeks,no days off, no where to run on that small ship. 6 weeks on then 6 to 14 days off. My advice, make friends in other departments quickly and hang out with them. You'll see enough of the galley staff while you are on duty.

Hiding out will be a bit easier with the entertainers or housekeepers. Plus you will have different backgrounds and experiences to share.

To answer your question, Apply to work at a stadium. They would probably love to have someone of your cruise ship experience when you are finished. Try to start making contact middle to end of july. Be honest and upfront with them, there is plenty of work to go around,they are always looking for part-time workers. Take what you can get to get your foot in the door. If you are good at your job they will quickly figure that out and move you somewhere better suited for your abilities. Major Race tracks are good for one weekend of working your ass off which you might be tired of doing by the time your ship experience is finished. Start thinking about where you want to live now and watch for craiglist ads in that local market. You never know when your job aboard the cruise ship is going south (figuratively) because they just had to fire a bunch of people and now everybody else has to pick up the slack or whatever else may happen. 

You may make friends with people aboard the ship and all want to live together and hang out off the ship. Be open to whatever oppotunity life presents you with.

 

Maybe you want to see more cool scenery and work in a national park? Do you already have your passport, Maybe you want to spend your winter months on a us virgin island. Your already packed up and living out of a suitcase, put your toes in the sand for thanksgiving and xmas holidays. You may be away from your family but it may be worth a shot to try it once during your life. Keep in touch and let us know what you decide. Cheers!

Sorry to mislead, the Alaska job will be working for a fishing lodge, but the pay is enough for me to live on the rest of the year. 

post #5 of 6

The southern states become home to many retirees during the winter.

Snowbirds stay at state parks as well as upscale rv "camps" (some even own homes in coastal communities).

I imagine you could work just about any place you apply....

 

Another option is to take some of that money and travel.

Pick up work whenever and wherever the fancy strikes.

 

Will you have a contract to return to Alaska next spring?

 

mimi

post #6 of 6

haha, my bad.

 

The key is your still going to Alaska and that is awesome. Your going to see some cool stuff, and people around you will be drinking a TON.

Try to tip well when you go into town and go to the same places consistently and try to befriend the people that live there. It won't be easy as they are used to tourists and stuff but you talk to them and they'll give you the insiders head-up on entertainment (if there is any.) Get ready for a lot of cool nights around the bon-fire.

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