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Anyone thought about selling their homemade dishes or pastry? Does it need any license?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I am thinking about selling my homemade recipes, just wondering if I would need any health or temporary license. Any good homemade food platform? Thanks

post #2 of 8

Errr are you talking about selling recipes or actual food?  Your question is ambiguous.

 

For food, you need to check your local regulations.  Most places require it to be made in a commercial kitchen (inspected by local food saftey/ health inspector).  To rent one of those,  you need to have passed typically ServSave manager exam, but again, check your local regulations.

 

There are sometimes provisions to bypass this for shelf stable baked goods.  Did I mention to check your local regulations?

post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Errr are you talking about selling recipes or actual food?  Your question is ambiguous.

 

For food, you need to check your local regulations.  Most places require it to be made in a commercial kitchen (inspected by local food saftey/ health inspector).  To rent one of those,  you need to have passed typically ServSave manager exam, but again, check your local regulations.

 

There are sometimes provisions to bypass this for shelf stable baked goods.  Did I mention to check your local regulations?

 

Your state may have a cottage law in place allowing you to use your home kitchen but the rules are usually pretty stiff about what is low/high risk.

If you try to go off the grid and someone gets sick you could lose everything you own and possibly spend some time in the brick house.

Like @MillionsKnives said....check your local regulations.

 

mimi

 

OBTW to answer your question....yes... and after I got all the legalities taken care of do a brisk business during the winter holidays.

 

m.

post #4 of 8

Thanks @flipflopgirl  Cottage law is what I was thinking of for baked goods. 

 

Food safety is no joke.  There was a botulism party just this week in Ohio. 1 fatality, 23 sick.  If you plan on selling homemade canned or jar goods, you definitely need to get the proper credentials.

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Thanks @flipflopgirl  Cottage law is what I was thinking of for baked goods. 

 

Food safety is no joke.  There was a botulism party just this week in Ohio. 1 fatality, 23 sick.  If you plan on selling homemade canned or jar goods, you definitely need to get the proper credentials.

 

Texas has a few products that will qualify ( candy and dried herbs and seasoning blends to name a few).

The raw dairy peeps have been trying to get added but don't know how they are doing with that.

Our legislature meets every two years so things move slowly but this I think is a good thing.

Not so many hotheads that just jump up and pass stuff...there is time to think and talk things over.

This year there is a stand alone cottage type bill that is having trouble getting out of the starting gate... it would just about demolish (or take a chunk out of) brick and mortar places.

I only skimmed it but that's what I got from it.

Bet the TRA was sweating bricks when they saw that one lol.

Give them a bone (original cottage law) and the next thing ya know they are draggin' the whole cow off.

 

mimi

post #6 of 8

Saw that Ohio thing on Fox news last nite.

A real disaster.

Bet whoever made the dish is feeling pretty low about now.

Hopefully the media doesn't get a hold of that name and spread it.

 

mimi

post #7 of 8

If you are selling prepared foods check your local county , state health laws. If I were you I would have product liability insurance in case someone gets sick because THEY didn't handle food correctly. YOU are libel.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #8 of 8

Like everyone said, check your local laws.  They vary from state to state and sometimes even from municipality to municipality.  Many states now have "cottage laws" that allow people to make certain foods, at home, in unlicensed kitchens, but they are very strict about what you can and cannot make and sell to the public.  Also, one catch to these laws is that they will often state how much money you are allowed to make a year off of these kinds of foods.  I know a few bakers that think they are on the right side of the law, because home baking is allowed, but they actually aren't because they far exceed the annual dollar amount they are allowed to make as a cottage industry.

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