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Looking for a dry powder mill that will give 10x - 14x

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I'm working on a project for work and a future business that requires one of my main ingredients to be super fine powder. I've tried blending it, which did a decent job, just it still leaves a gritty texture. I've also tried a pestle, with what came from the grinder, and while that was better, it still left a slight grit. This ingredient is going to be used in chocolates, so I can't dissolve it in water. Any ideas? It's driving me crazy.
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 

Nevermind, I have answered my own question. I completely forgot about the steps to making chocolate and assumed my issue was this ingredient and not all of it together. I need a refiner, in case anyone else runs into this problem. Does anyone have any good suggestions for one?

post #3 of 7

I don't know what a refiner is but I'd be interested in finding out and I'm sure others would be as well. Please post more information 

about your process so we can all learn more. 

     Reading your first post made me think of scientific equipment catalogues. The use of lab equipment in the kitchen is becoming more common these days. Like I said, I don't know what a refiner is but I would think you could find something useful in a lab catalogue. 

post #4 of 7

@chefwriter........here's some info for you!

http://chocolatealchemy.com/conching-and-refining/

 

Here is a link to a small refiner.....no price listed. It's probably a thousand million dollars like almost all pastry equipment these days! Ha ha!

http://www.chocolatemixer.in/fiverollrefiner.html

post #5 of 7

So after a bit of research a Spectra 11 is recommended for home use and runs about $500. They go up from there to about $2500 for large commercial units. 

This is a great learning process. I eat chocolate every day so it's nice to finally understand how it's made. 

post #6 of 7

In my day what is pictured was not called a refiner . It was simply a large fitted fine sieve that sat on the mixing bowl of an old Hobart mixer and a double set of rollers was attached to the shaft of the machine. We used it to puree soups and sauces. And potatoes. You could buy different size sieves.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

I was thinking of going the sieves way, but for sugar, it'll eventually start ripping the metal apart as it's not really soft (my assumption.) I'm making my own chocolate from scratch, actually combining the ingredients together. Until I have it finalized, I can't really describe my product or the details of it, but it looks like I'll have to save money for the Spectra 11, but even with that, I'll only be able to produce 56 bars at a time with it, at most.

 

I'll definately keep everyone updated though. More than likely, I'll just have to mortar and pestle it for now.

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