or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Homemade Pancetta

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

Just about 2 pounds of pork belly. Soaked in white wine, a pinot grigio, for about 30 hours, then into the cure. Not a very good job of evenly spreading the peppercorns and juniper berries, but I'm not too worried. It should still end up being a nice piece of pancetta.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #2 of 13

Look forward to seeing the end result! Do you cure this in the refrigerator and then smoke it?

post #3 of 13

Nice can't wait to see the finished product. Is this your first attempt at pancetta?

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

No, I've made it several times before.  It gets cured for about a week in the fridge, soaked in wine again, then hung to dry. Normally pancetta is unsmoked.  I do need to do another slab or two of bacon soon.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

The belly felt firm enough, time to take it out of the cure, give it a rinse, get the big chunks off.

 

 

You might notice that I left the skin on for this piece. Usually pancetta is cured skinless, but I had in mind curing skin on, then trimming the skin for use in a batch of beans for the park.

 

 

My knife skills could use some work. But the fat and slivers of meat carved off with the skin will add taste to the pot of beans for the homeless. Not too worried about it.

 

So another soak in white wine:

 

 

Another inexpensive pinot grigio. The name reminds me of a Cheftalk regular, but I just can't remember who.  Shucks.

 

A day or so in the fridge covered, then rinsed again before drying.  Time. And more time. I don't think I've ever seen a "30 minute charcuterie" book. The original title I chose for this thread was "Salt. Time." I was thinking of starting what could be a long term thread for this sort of thing, but perhaps the original title was too close to a certain book title. So it goes.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #6 of 13

Skin on works perfectly fine. Been doing it that way all the time. Looking good!

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

Done. Yum.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #8 of 13
Wow, very lean too!
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

A bit too lean for my taste. That's why I decided to leave it flat and treat it more like bacon rather than roll as is done more traditionally. But it is really tasty.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #10 of 13

From here it looks purely amazing. Great job. 

post #11 of 13

Yeah, I really like the look of that!

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

A bit too lean for my taste. That's why I decided to leave it flat and treat it more like bacon rather than roll as is done more traditionally. But it is really tasty.

 

mjb.

 

Nothing more or less traditional about it - flat pancetta tesa and rolled pancetta arottolata are both perfectly valid and traditional. I generally do flat ones myself.

post #13 of 13
Me too. Rolling is nice but doesn't seem to add anything special to the taste.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking