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May 2015 Challenge - FOWL - Page 4

post #91 of 116

So I started off by marinating chicken breasts in a homemade beef gravy, with some red peppers and onions to add flavor for about 6 hours.

 

I then put them on skewers and very slowly cooked them on low charcoal heat.

 

I then pulled them off the skewers, pulled them apart in the remaining gravy, and poured it all on top of some homemade fried gnocchis, and then garnished.

 

This is the result.

 

post #92 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

Nice to see great looking dishes coming in.  Since I issued the challenge I thought I would challenge myself.  I had a duck and the luxury of an empty icebox so I tried my hand at a Peking style Duck . . . . come and meet my little friend -

 

(And yes I removed the pop up)

 

 

After hanging over night I filled my wok with water, honey, five spice, rice vinegar, mirin, a hot pepper, black pepper, shallot, bay, thyme and a corn starch slurry.  Then I ladled that over the duck for 10 minutes and hung it back in the icebox for another six hours.

 

 

 

 

After that I hung it in the house to room temp, put two large orange quarters in the cavity and into a 350 oven on a rack breast side up for 30 min. then turned it over for 30 min. then breast side up for 30 min.  After that the first round I put foil on the wing tips and after the third round I cranked the heat up to 450 till it was crispy.  I served it over rice noodles with a sauce - garlic, ginger, shallot, red pepper, snow peas, scallion, and cilantro.  The sauce part was sesame oil, oyster sauce, hoisin, chili paste, five spice, sugar, and a turkey stock/corn starch slurry.  I precooked the rice noodle and added that to the wok at the last minute.  Plated and garnished with cilantro.  Crispy Baby - yeah!!!

 

Pardon my ignorance, but what is the purpose of hanging it?

post #93 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by dantech View Post
 

Pardon my ignorance, but what is the purpose of hanging it?

 

Drying of the skin for the extra crispiness.

post #94 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post
 

 

Drying of the skin for the extra crispiness.

Of course! I'm so stupid...

 

Looks great BTW.

post #95 of 116
Thread Starter 

Thanks - yes it works.  Like I said I have the luxury of an empty fridge.  I also have half a venison rib cage in the freezer that I'll process for BBQ venison ribs one of these days.

post #96 of 116

Hey can you hang yours in the oven?  Have you tried?

 

Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

Nice to see great looking dishes coming in.  Since I issued the challenge I thought I would challenge myself.  I had a duck and the luxury of an empty icebox so I tried my hand at a Peking style Duck . . . . come and meet my little friend -

 

 

post #97 of 116

Makes me think of using a pit barrel cooker, which even comes with meat hooks: http://pitbarrelcooker.com/  It's kind of a smoker, but it's direct heat from what I can tell.

 

From the vids of peking duck I've seen, they happen in a recessed brick oven with burning hardwood on the outside. 

post #98 of 116
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

 

I can't I have a Southbend commercial range.  I'm going to try it when the smoker my son built using a 275 gallon fuel tank get it going.  Luckily he's right next door.  Kuan - that duck terrine looks terrific I have to try that some time.

 

@MillionsKnives - I've seen them ladle hot fat over them before serving too for extra crispness in restaurants and at Kam Man in Chinatown NYC.  

post #99 of 116

Don't forget the other secrets of 1)pin pricking the skin 2) pumping air under the skin on the breast for better fat rendering and crisping

post #100 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Makes me think of using a pit barrel cooker, which even comes with meat hooks: http://pitbarrelcooker.com/  It's kind of a smoker, but it's direct heat from what I can tell.

 

From the vids of peking duck I've seen, they happen in a recessed brick oven with burning hardwood on the outside. 

 

That is what the BBQ guys usually call an UDS - ugly drum smoker. Technically direct heat, but you fire it very low and have the meat at a good distance, so you are running at 110-130°C at your meat rack, basic BBQ conditions. 300$ for a ready made one is somewhat steep - get an old oil drum, cut off the top with an angle grinder, weld in some rests for the rack and you are done for $50.

post #101 of 116
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Don't forget the other secrets of 1)pin pricking the skin 2) pumping air under the skin on the breast for better fat rendering and crisping

 

OH the skin got pricked all over, but I didn't have a means to blow air under the skin.  My shop compressor would do it, but it might blow the skin right off - :lol:

post #102 of 116

You put a straw in a convenient place and blow.  That or bicycle pump.

post #103 of 116
Thread Starter 

Now why didn't I think of that?  

post #104 of 116

I use this high tech solution that came with my exercise ball

post #105 of 116
Thread Starter 

Now that I have in the house and will use it next time.  I won't have the opportunity to hang one like that again, but will separate the skin like that for sure.  :thumb: 

post #106 of 116

I remember an episode of Iron Chef America where Ming Tsai used a small electric air compressor to do the job.  Fun.

 

Now to the matter at hand.

 

The Players

 

 

Trying my hand at an Ethiopian chicken stew, doro wat.

 

 

A good broth really improves a dish. I used some turkey bones and duck feet for this batch.

 

 

And for chicken stew you need chicken, in this case about 3 pounds of legs.

 

 

And of course various other ingredients, like salt, red onions, berbere powder, ginger root, garlic and black cardamom pods. As well as eggs and some lime juice for the finished product.

 

 

Do you think I got some good extraction in that broth?

 

 

The Procedure

 

 

First order of business was to make the broth, which was done a few days ago. As you can see from the blobs in the measuring cup, it turned out quite gelatinous. Great stuff!

 

Now to start by thinly slicing up the onions.

 

 

Looks like quite the pile, but wait about an hour.  The onions, along with about 1/4 cup of butter go into a dutch oven over medium low heat. Let them sit for a few minutes, salt liberally, then stir every 10 minutes or so until nice and soft and carmelized.

 

 

They cooked down to a mere shadow of their former selves. Add the minced garlic, grated cardamom  and ginger, along with the berbere. Stir it around for about a minute or two until it gets fragrant. Very nicely fragrant, I must say.  Smells SO good!

 

Okay, everybody into the pot!

 

 

Bring it to a boil, then turn down the heat, cover and let simmer for about 45 minutes.

 

Once the chicken is nice and tender, remove the lid, turn up the heat and reduce the sauce.

 

 

 

The Product

 

Add the juice of 1 lime, give it a stir and serve it up over some wedges of hard cooked egg:

 

 

Wow. That broth is very rich, very flavorlful. Could have used more of the berbere powder, and perhaps more of the cardamom, but it was VERY tasty as is.  Yum, Yum.

 

Oh, and I recently got a new toy to do eggs:

 

 

Kind of handy, I like it.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #107 of 116
Thread Starter 

9:03 PM  EST - Can't stay up for midnight PST so I'll decide a winner over coffee and biscotti tomorrow morning.  

post #108 of 116
Thread Starter 

Lots of good entries and it came down to four which made for a tough choice.  However - there can only be one and the winner of the May "FOWL" Challenge is Kuan's Terrine of Duck.  It focussed on the ingredient and elevated it to something extra ordinary while still appearing relatively simple.  I also like the fact that he laid it all out for anyone to follow and make.  Congratulations Kuan.

 

 

I'm looking forwards to the June Challenge.

post #109 of 116

Nice! One of my favorites for the month.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #110 of 116
An excellent choice, that terrine blew me away, congrats Kuan!

And thank you for being such a gracious host Mike9!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #111 of 116

Congratulations Kuan! 

post #112 of 116

I was expecting to see a few classics like chicken fricasee, and perhaps ostrich meatballs or some such. Of course I didn't do anything too exotic, silkie chicken is not that uncommon.

 

Now, what is in store for next month, @kuan ?

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #113 of 116

Thank you for the honor.  I will acknowledge and thank you, but I will cede. :)  So sorry, but you will have to pick another winner. 

post #114 of 116
Thread Starter 

This is a sticky wicket - please rethink your decision Kuan - after all you did post legitimate entries and I'm not the only one who found them worthy of the win.  

post #115 of 116

On a side note, for the two challenges I hosted I contacted the persons privately before making the public announcement.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #116 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

This is a sticky wicket - please rethink your decision Kuan - after all you did post legitimate entries and I'm not the only one who found them worthy of the win.  

 

 OK I accept.  :)  This month's challenge will me the common tomato.  http://www.cheftalk.com/t/86092/june-2015-challenge-tomatoes

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