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Question about bins

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

OK, whenever you use a plastic bin for storage of dry goods such as rice, sugar, or flour, am I crazy in thinking that you dump the product out of the original bag and into the bin?  I just found out yesterday that it is apparently policy that you keep the product in the original bag and just place that into the bin.  I personally think that is crazy and kind of defeats the purpose of the bin, but what do I know.  How does it work at your places?

post #2 of 16

We dump straight into bins at our stadium. Some will even take it a step further at the bottom and dump the last of the bin into another container. Then start fresh with a new 50lb bag in the bin with the old stuff placed on top. We also use an empty bin for mixing up our tempura batter for our chix nuggets. 

post #3 of 16

We just dump it straight in. 

 

Rotating product (old on top of new) doesn't even matter... its dry goods that won't go bad before you use it.

 

Bins should be cleaned out completely at least once a week anyways, so ya no need to waste your time rotating product.

post #4 of 16
Cross contaminating can be an issue here.

Fill up the bin. Use all the product. Clean bin. Rinse, repeat.
post #5 of 16
Like bags of flour? Like bags of flour that I see sitting on the ground all the time? Like bags of flour that sit on the floor of the Sysco warehouse for god knows how long ? They want you to put that bag in to the container? tongue.gif
post #6 of 16
All food needs to be 6 " off floor.
post #7 of 16

Most important thing with dry storage is temp and moisture. Here, ingredients stay in the bag, and in the container. it's FIFO with any food stuffs, even dry. We can keep multiple items in bins. Like a bag of cake flour and a bag of apf. Bags and the outside of the container must be labeled and dated. Here, it is 6" off ground and 2 ft. from ceiling to keep product cool.

As @chefboyOG says. It can be a cross contamination issue. The regulations are stricter for specialty shops like gluten free. Nothing can be combined.

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post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

All food needs to be 6 " off floor.
Really? Let's be honest though. Those bags of flour have been on the floor at some point from their journey from mill to your kitchen, was more my point.
post #9 of 16
Lets be honest, food needs to be stored in your professional kitchen, 6" off the floor.

I see your point but someone was asking for help with storage, not whether or not Susco has a good food safety program.

By the way if you see the flour sitting on the floor at susco or on the truck or in the back of your kitchen, tell someone to get their act together.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

Lets be honest, food needs to be stored in your professional kitchen, 6" off the floor.

I see your point but someone was asking for help with storage, not whether or not Susco has a good food safety program.
.
no but thats my point putting the bag into the container may be introducing x from the floor. say a scoop is also stored in the bin. x contammed the scoop, which in turn contammed the flour see?
post #11 of 16
Ah I see! Good point.

Keep the scoop in the bag in that case.
post #12 of 16

Our  Health Department interprets the FDA guidelines as leave the scoop in the bag, but the handle has to be strait up and not touching anything. It's lost points if the handle is touching the bag or ingredients. Getting way OT, but I think the OP is in my state

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post #13 of 16
Hows it way off topic @panini? Im in Canada and in my Province the Health Inspector also check handles.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

I know that the general guideline for scoops stored in dry ingredients here in the states is that it must be pointing up, not touching the dry goods themselves.  I'm not sure what the health inspection guidelines are for actually storing things in bins.  

post #15 of 16

@ChefMannyDLM,

  Over the years and moving around, I've found that really nothing is set in stone when it come to Food regulations and guidelines. It is based on how your jurisdiction

interprets what the FDA has in print. One one side of my town, the inspector wants my sani, rag buckets on a separate bench. On the other side of town the inspector

requires the buckets to be on the floor.:eek:

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post #16 of 16
The thing with scoop handles was never pointed out to me in all my years of inspections. I just make sure the scoop handle is pointed up and out of whatever it is in. I do this because it makes sense, I don't want to grab a sugary or floury handle with clean hands......q
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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