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Help designing the perfect wooden spoon

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I'm a woodworker, not a chef.  I've been making some spoons that have had great reviews due to their handle shapes.  I personally test the feel of each handle dozens of times throughout the process of making each spoon.  

 

But, that's only half the spoon.  So, what about the scoop end?  My current ones are designed more for stirring, but can't necessarily hold much.

 

If you were to describe the perfect wooden spoon, what would the scoop end be like? Consider:

* Hook angle

* Scoop depth

* Scoop size

* End shape

* (other features you would find important)

 

In a nutshell, I'm trying to create a spoon that would essentially sell itself once it gets into the hands of a chef...not one that just looks cute on Etsy.

 

So, from the perspective of chefs, how would you describe the scoop end of the perfect wooden spoon?

post #2 of 5

Honestly.. your only workable area is in the handle ergonomics. The problem space of stirring has been attacked for over a thousand years and ultimately we end up with this:

 

 

As far as the scoop end, you have to try to strike a balance within various styles of cookware. Pans, pots, skillets, bowls, etc. Even within each major category there are variances of curvature at the base, sometimes curvature in the body of the pot, etc.

 

So you either strike a balance for utility across all these variances, or you specialize.

Just my opinion. If you are hand making these, concentrate on the uniqueness/beauty of the wood, and on the handle/grip ergonomics.

post #3 of 5

I am on the pastry side. I think my dream spoon would be cupped like a spoon and angled as to get in the corners of the pan. There are many formulas that will over cook in the corners of the sauce pan. Like calking a tub. I also would love to have a spoon that is tapered.Beefy near the cup part and taper up. I can't tell you how many spoons I have broken on choux paste. The tendency is to move up the handle to avoid the steam and pop. I can PM my address if you need a tester.:smoking:

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #4 of 5

Okay.  Don't laugh.  I like the idea of this Loch Ness ladle.  It has little "feet" so it wont tip over, stands up in the pot, easy handle, tall enough.

 

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/439312138627444752/

 

At $16, they're sold out.

 

http://www.animicausa.com/shop/Nessie-Ladle/tpflypage.tpl.html

post #5 of 5

Good Lord! but I would have no use for the Nessie.

 

It sound like what Panini really needs is more of a spatula, slightly angled maybe, and wood being such that with a drill and drum-sander attachment you can easily shape the proper corner to suite.

 

If you wanted a cup then I would bring the tip to a radiused and obtusely angled (just under 90deg) point with a lip allowing, again, for some sanding to shape.  Have the angle to the handle be asymmetric, like 10-30deg instead of 45.  Or even just a stubby teardrop shape, the small end being opposite the handle.

 

 

Rick

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