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cooking with salsa

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Bought a few bottles of Great Value salsa from Walmart for corn chips. Salsa turned out to be rather good, thick and not runny like lot of brands are. Roasted corn & Black Bean and Restaurant Style Salsa, roasted corn is very good. I cooked chicken in salsa once so was wondering how else can it be used besides frying chicken breast init.
post #2 of 16
Top sandwiches, scramble it with eggs, toss with pasta, use it as a dressing in salads, top a baked potato with it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 16

I would stay away from the bottled/jarred products, and make it fresh, i.e. pico with fresh tomatoes, avocado, mango, strawberries or watermelon.  Add cilantro and fresh lime juice & red onion.   Serve over seafood or fish tacos.

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
 

I would stay away from the bottled/jarred products, and make it fresh, i.e. pico with fresh tomatoes, avocado, mango, strawberries or watermelon.  Add cilantro and fresh lime juice & red onion.   Serve over seafood or fish tacos.

 

I agree, I never touch the bottled stuff myself since salsa is one of the simplest things to make, no cooking involved lol.  But in this case it seems the OP is already stuck with a bunch of bottles.  OP you could return it and get your money back!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 16
I use bottled salsa. It can be quite good. My friend is a fan of that corn and bean salsa. My favorite is arriba roasted salsa. If I can't get that then La Victoria thick and chunky.

I use it more as a garnish than a cooking aid.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 16
I keep salsa on hand , when I want a few chips I'm not going through the hassle of making salsa. Some are good, others not so.

I made snapper Veracruz a while back just added a pepper, onion, olives & capers to some Safeway brand black bean & corn salsa, turned out quite good for something quick.
post #7 of 16

In my neck of the woods, Salsa and Pico de Gallo are two different things. Salsa is prepared sometimes cooked or roasted. It's more of a liquid base of Pico ingredients with garlic and so on. Mine is actually strained with no chunks. I like to roast Hatch when in season and make salsa. I prefer green salsa when making it super hot.. It's common here to keep bottled salsa around. I like Arriba.

Pico is usually just Fresh chopped tom,onions,jalapenos,cilantro. It's usually whipped up before a meal and used on just about anything almost daily.

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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #8 of 16
post #9 of 16

You can make a vinaigrette with it You can also flambe some tequila, add some stock and salsa, reduce and finish with butter for a sauce for chicken, shrimp, fish, etc.

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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #10 of 16
Atop some grilled fish marinaded in Italian dressing, with some poached shrimp
post #11 of 16

For breakfast we like to poach eggs in salsa.

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
 

I would stay away from the bottled/jarred products, and make it fresh, i.e. pico with fresh tomatoes, avocado, mango, strawberries or watermelon.  Add cilantro and fresh lime juice & red onion.   Serve over seafood or fish tacos.


Couldn't agree more, having that mix over tacos can make or break it.

post #13 of 16

Bottle or jarred products must be "canned."  By definition that means bringing them to a temperature of at least 240 deg F which changes the nature of many ingredients, including tomato based ingredients.  It can actually hve a positive effect on some ingredients, including many of those based on hot or spicy flavorings.

 

TRIVIA:  The word "salsa"  is both an Italian and a Spanish word and in both cases it simply means "sauce."  No tomatoes, not hot pepppers are required.  It applies equally to pan sauce, hollandaise, bernaise, salsa verde etc..  

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlh2003 View Post

Atop some grilled fish marinaded in Italian dressing, with some poached shrimp

Just curious....won't the acid in a vinaigrette (Italian dressing) cook the fish past cerviche and into mush?
The cotton farmer (hubs #2) ruined a few lbs of gorgeous shrimp, just off the boat, with this treatment.
I tried my best and managed to gag a couple down but that was it lol.
Did he just leave it sitting too long?

mimi
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

Just curious....won't the acid in a vinaigrette (Italian dressing) cook the fish past cerviche and into mush?
The cotton farmer (hubs #2) ruined a few lbs of gorgeous shrimp, just off the boat, with this treatment.
I tried my best and managed to gag a couple down but that was it lol.
Did he just leave it sitting too long?

mimi

My guess would be yes he left it sitting to long, when I do it its more of a coating, I only let it sit 5-10mins at most 15-20 in the Italian dressing.
post #16 of 16
Thanks.
Just one of many reasons I switched the farmer out for the fisherman lol.

mimi
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