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In or Out of the Fridge? - Page 2

post #31 of 48
In Canada, the number of Chickens with Salmonella is high, something like 1 in 6. This salmonella can penetrate even the shell and be found inside the yolk. Refrigeration @<4*C is recommended to slow the bacteria growth. They arent recommending eating sunny or over easy either especially for immuno compromised individuals, because there is a higher chance if foodborne illness.

Personally, I take my chanced I love my OE eggs.

PHF- Potentially hazardous foods need to be in the fridge, or kept in dried/ frozen state.
post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

In Canada, the number of Chickens with Salmonella is high, something like 1 in 6. This salmonella can penetrate even the shell and be found inside the yolk. Refrigeration @<4*C is recommended to slow the bacteria growth. They arent recommending eating sunny or over easy either especially for immuno compromised individuals, because there is a higher chance if foodborne illness.

Personally, I take my chanced I love my OE eggs.

PHF- Potentially hazardous foods need to be in the fridge, or kept in dried/ frozen state.


yep, I need runny eggs...over easy, sunny side up...just something to stick my toast in...

post #33 of 48

Teamfat I'm perplexed at your statement, at least in that to have a runny yoke you have to pull them right out of the fridge before cooking.  Maybe if you don't want a runny yoke and do want the whites soft as possible then I guess you go room temp...

 

 

Rick

post #34 of 48
im an egg and soldiers boy myself cool.gif
post #35 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

Teamfat I'm perplexed at your statement, at least in that to have a runny yoke [sic] you have to pull them right out of the fridge before cooking.  Maybe if you don't want a runny yoke and do want the whites soft as possible then I guess you go room temp...

 

 

Rick

 

 

A room temp egg put in a frying pan will cook a bit more quickly, allowing the white to set without the yolk getting overdone. Right out of the fridge takes longer, with a greater chance of having the yolk overcooked before the white sets.

 

mjb.

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post #36 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

Teamfat I'm perplexed at your statement, at least in that to have a runny yoke you have to pull them right out of the fridge before cooking.  Maybe if you don't want a runny yoke and do want the whites soft as possible then I guess you go room temp...

 

 

Rick

 

I've done this experiment several times.  When I let the eggs reach room temp they taste better every single time.  I usually make mine over easy or lightly scrambled.  I don't know why, they just taste much better I swear it!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #37 of 48

Eggs stay out - non-industrial, from our own backyard hens. They keep weeks without refrigerating.

post #38 of 48

Ginger root is a tough one. It's one of those things I feel like I always need to have on hand, since I eat a lot of Indian and E. Asian dishes. But, I've thrown out more little pieces of ginger than I care to think about.

 

I've tried it in. I've tried it out. Sometimes it dries out. Sometimes it gets unpleasantly squishy. I've tried storing it in a jar of sherry in the refrigerator with some success. I haven't tried freezing it but I like the fresh flavor of freshly microplaned or minced ginger.

 

In the end, since I live in a neighborhood where ginger is steps away from where I get off the train every day but Sunday and also readily available on my Sunday fruit market run, I just buy it in what I'm sure the Asian shopkeepers I buy it from must consider to be pathetically small pieces and hope I use the piece before the week is out. And, I keep it out.

post #39 of 48
Thread Starter 
Ginger, freeze it. It grates on. Micro plane just fine!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefboyOG View Post

In Canada, the number of Chickens with Salmonella is high, something like 1 in 6. ...

Funny, that is what we are told here in Canada about the USA.

 

I monitor food recalls in Canada and in the past 15 years, since I have been monitoring the Governments food recalls via e-mail alerts, I never seen salmonella recall of fresh eggs.

Mandatory practice in Québec for laying chickens include routine medical check-ups each bird and removal of birds when infected.  More and more farmers are vaccinating against salmonella now (a common practice in Europe).

 

Luc H.

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post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFart View Post
 

I'm not 100% sure about this, but I heard if you cover the outside of the egg in a light coating of oil, the eggs will last several weeks outside of the fridge.


Washed and sanitized eggs can be contaminated post process.  The shell is more porous after the process.  The danger is when the cold chain is broken: a cold egg left on the counter to warm up then refrigerated may become contaminated by aspirating surface bacteria through the pores by contraction of the air pocket in the egg... I know a long shot but it is one reason washed and sanitized must be kept in the fridge until ready to consumed.

 

Luc H.

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post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

I keep eggs in, and usually remember to pull them out in time to get them to room temp before cooking. Doesn't make any difference in scrambled or omelets, but does in fried, poached, soft cooked.


 

Yes room temperature eggs are less prone to have their yolk break during frying.  The reason that the membrane around the yolk, like all living tissue membranes, is made of polyunsaturated fat.  When cold the membranes are more brittle and when warm, more pliable.

Before frying eggs, I let them soak in a bowl of hot tap water for 5 minute or so.  This way I control my time-temp (although leaving them on the counter for 1-2 hours is not that risky).

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post
 


Washed and sanitized eggs can be contaminated post process.  The shell is more porous after the process.  The danger is when the cold chain is broken: a cold egg left on the counter to warm up then refrigerated may become contaminated by aspirating surface bacteria through the pores by contraction of the air pocket in the egg... I know a long shot but it is one reason washed and sanitized must be kept in the fridge until ready to consumed.

 

Luc H.

 

point taken...I thought it might be a urban myth, and your post proved it was.

post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

Ginger root is in a small canning jar in the freezer.

 

mimi

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Ginger, freeze it. It grates on. Micro plane just fine!

 

Agree!

When the root has defrosted and then grated it releases lots of  "juice".

Way better than dealing with the fibrous pieces IMO.

 

 

mimi

post #45 of 48

How many of you freeze some your spices and dried herbs?

I picked this trick up from my mom and it does seem to make a difference with the shelf life.

 

mimi


Edited by flipflopgirl - 5/25/15 at 7:09am
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

How many of you freeze some your spices and dried herbs?

I picked this trick up from my mom and it does seem to make a difference with the shelf life.

 

mimi

 

I freeze fresh herbs.  Pepper is said to improve from freezing.  Freezing is simply going to greatly extend all around integrity.  Hope there are no counter-intuitives to this.

 

As to eggs, I'm going to try the hot water method, done right the yoke should still maintain some chill.  As it is though the yokes of my OE's suffer no more than a light skinning on the bottom using eggs straight from the fridge.

 

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 5/25/15 at 1:00pm
post #47 of 48

I freeze curry leaves which I have only found at one or two Indian markets, none of which are on my regularly traveled public transit routes, but they never really have much flavor after being frozen.

 

The one thing I do freeze and think it does not suffer is basil that I grow on my windowsills. I make a kind of pesto with it, with just olive oil.

post #48 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

 

 

Agree!

When the root has defrosted and then grated it releases lots of  "juice".

Way better than dealing with the fibrous pieces IMO.

 

 

mimi

The trick is to remove the ginger root from the freezer and grate it while frozen. Works great.

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