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A Two Parter: TI Sab Nogent and Old Warped TI Sab.

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hi guys. I've been lurking the forums for quite a while, and have picked up an incredible amount of useful info, but I had a couple of questions, being:

1. I'm looking for a workhorse 12-incher, french profile, and have fallen in love with Nogents that Thiers Issard are finishing up. My question is regarding the structural integrity, or possible lack thereof, that goes along with not having a full tang. Does anyone happen to have any experience, negative or positive, with the structure of these knives?

2. I recently stumbled upon an old TI Sab, and picked it up for nearly nothing. Unfortunately, there is a noticeable warp when sighting the blade and I was wondering, more or less, wherher this would render it unsharpenable (unusable). I know TI warns that the nature of the manufacturing can sometimes cause defects, so at what point do these defects cause usability problems? Also, TI apparently has a lifetime warranty. Does anyone know anything about this?
post #2 of 4

1) That full tang stuff is post world war II marketing.  All it does is add weight to the handle.  Some people want handle heavy, some like blade heavy.  You should learn to use a pinch grip, then you don't care as much.

 

2) It's soft carbon steel, you could try to straighten it out yourself.  It's a learning experience.

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/71981/straightening-out-a-knife#post_503798

post #3 of 4
Bernard Levine, who knows his stuff, wrote about the original Nogent:
"The original ebony handles
tend to split, because they
are bored down the center
with a large diameter hole,
leaving just a thin web of
wood on the sides. They
look solid, but they're not."
The handle ended with a tiny bullet on the fine rat tail, all that fragile.
Not really a problem in pre-WW2 France where a new ebony handle was cheap and could easily be replaced.
The modern NOS -- new old stock -- have a really solid wooden handle that is glued, epoxy I guess. Quite solid.
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replIes. I was mostly concerned that the length of the knife would cause added stress on the handle depending on what's being cut, but that probably isn't too rational, and a pinch grip would certainly solve that.

I appreciate the info about the NOS handles. I hadn't realized that was the case.
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