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Safe Granite Cutting Boards

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

I am new to this forum, and wanted to post something about my kickstarter safe granite cutting boards.

Not 100% sure this type of activity is allowed, so I thought I'd ask first.

 

Thanks

post #2 of 28

I don't quite follow... are you saying that you use a  knife directly on granite?  

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post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

I don't quite follow... are you saying that you use a  knife directly on granite?  

Yes...if you use a slicing motion with the knife, the dulling of the blade can be minimized. If you do a chopping motion, then you'll ruin your knives pretty fast...lol.

 

The granite is polished and sealed, so there is no chance of staining or bacteria growth, as long as it's cleaned regularly with normal dish soap.

 

Wood also dulls knife blades, but holds bacteria as well.


Edited by OldFart - 5/22/15 at 12:14pm
post #4 of 28

Um, just curious,

How is your cutting board different then the hundreds already out there in the market? I had one yrs. ago and found that all the cutting (which dulled my knives) the granite became porous quickly and had to be resealed.

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post #5 of 28

I dunno about granite cutting boards.....

 

Now, mind you the following is just one personal opinion, but it's been formed by working in commercial kitchens for almost 35 years, and in 3 continents, and with dealing with all kinds of health inspectors.

 

1) Cutting boards should be cheap like borscht and plentifull.  It sure helps to have one dedicated for desserts, and one for garlic......

 

2)"  " should be made of a material softer than the material of the knife--much softer

 

3) "  " should NOT have a slick surface, as many foods are wet and will slide and skate about on a slick surface

 

4)  "   " should be easily sanitized, my personal preference is to toss the thing in the dishwasher and it's done.

 

After close to 35 years in commercial kitchens my preference is the nylon cutting board: Cheap, easily sanitized, softer than steel.  Yes, they scar--either the knife scars the board or the board dulls the knife, and I don't like to sharpen unneccesarily.  Scarred nylon boards can be run through a woodworker's thickness planer giving you two new pristine surfaces, they can be planed down with hand planes, or they can be tossed out.

 

Wood is nice, but is not easily sanitized.

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post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

Um, just curious,

How is your cutting board different then the hundreds already out there in the market? I had one yrs. ago and found that all the cutting (which dulled my knives) the granite became porous quickly and had to be resealed.

If you use a slicing motion, rather than a cutting or chopping motion, the blade dulling is kept to a minimum. It will dull your knives, but I always sharpen my knives about once a month anyway ( I have cheap knives ) lol.

 

Resealing granite takes only a few minutes. As with anything you purchase, maintenance is part of owning an item. You wash your car, clean your oven, sharpen your knives, etc. Just part of routine maintenance. If you use a dishwasher to clean the board, you'll have to reseal more often.

 

My boards have silicone feet, which keep the board from moving, while slicing food. Also, the price will be between $15-$20 + shipping. Most granite boards are $23-$100.

 

I would put up a link here, but I don't want to be banned due to "promoting my product". If you go to kickstarter's website, and search for granite cutting board, you can find a video showing me trying to push the cutting board around. The video is poor quality, but it makes the point.

post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

I dunno about granite cutting boards.....

 

Now, mind you the following is just one personal opinion, but it's been formed by working in commercial kitchens for almost 35 years, and in 3 continents, and with dealing with all kinds of health inspectors.

 

1) Cutting boards should be cheap like borscht and plentifull.  It sure helps to have one dedicated for desserts, and one for garlic......

 

2)"  " should be made of a material softer than the material of the knife--much softer

 

3) "  " should NOT have a slick surface, as many foods are wet and will slide and skate about on a slick surface

 

4)  "   " should be easily sanitized, my personal preference is to toss the thing in the dishwasher and it's done.

 

After close to 35 years in commercial kitchens my preference is the nylon cutting board: Cheap, easily sanitized, softer than steel.  Yes, they scar--either the knife scars the board or the board dulls the knife, and I don't like to sharpen unneccesarily.  Scarred nylon boards can be run through a woodworker's thickness planer giving you two new pristine surfaces, they can be planed down with hand planes, or they can be tossed out.

 

Wood is nice, but is not easily sanitized.


Answers:

1) My board will be $15-$20 + shipping. Granite is usually over a million years old. With proper care and use, it should last a lifetime. That's cheaper than having to replace a board every month due to knife cuts in wood or plastic.

2) Yes, granite is harder than the steel blade, and will dull the knife blade. Slicing on the board will be ok, but chopping / cutting should be avoided.

3) Yes, granite is slick. But like anything, practice makes perfect. Slow and steady slicing until you get comfortable with the surface should do the trick.

4) Putting granite into a dishwasher is ok, but having to reseal it more often.

 

You can also use this as a serving dish ( anti-pasto comes to mind ), or to put a warm pot on. The silicone can take heat up to around 350 degrees. The granite itself can withstand heat up to 1200 degrees. Obviously, you won't get it that hot in normal use....lol.

 

This probably isn't a board to use in a commercial environment. It's only 12x12, so home use would be the preferred use.

post #8 of 28

@OldFart

Thanks for the response. I did go to the kickstarter site. I hope you achieve your goal.

I understand routine maintenance, but sharpening your knives takes a bit of time to do it correctly. I also think most people at ChefTalk are some type of foodie and

know the value of owning a good knife and probably understand the slicing procedure, unless they're still watching Martin Yan videos.:) The marble expedites the dulling..

I did look at some boards and they are mostly in the same price range but the shipping is the nut to crack.

Bacteria is a factor, I guess. Most any board can be quickly sanitized as you go. The porous nature of some boards might hold the bacteria where it hits but the marble would

let it spread over the whole board.

I hope you reach your goal. For what it's worth, can I suggest some sort of non-porous, non-slip sheet held to the bottom of the board with static so you're able to flip the board to

use both surfaces. Just sayin

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post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

@OldFart

Thanks for the response. I did go to the kickstarter site. I hope you achieve your goal.

I understand routine maintenance, but sharpening your knives takes a bit of time to do it correctly. I also think most people at ChefTalk are some type of foodie and

know the value of owning a good knife and probably understand the slicing procedure, unless they're still watching Martin Yan videos.:) The marble expedites the dulling..

I did look at some boards and they are mostly in the same price range but the shipping is the nut to crack.

Bacteria is a factor, I guess. Most any board can be quickly sanitized as you go. The porous nature of some boards might hold the bacteria where it hits but the marble would

let it spread over the whole board.

I hope you reach your goal. For what it's worth, can I suggest some sort of non-porous, non-slip sheet held to the bottom of the board with static so you're able to flip the board to

use both surfaces. Just sayin


@panini

 

Very good suggestions!

 

While most boards hold bacteria, granite is sealed. Once this chemical sealing takes place, it's virtually water proof.

 

As for as a non slip sheet, that is also a good idea. Silicone is pretty expensive, so it would have to be a very thin sheet, which might not hold up to daily use.

 

I was going to make silicone feet to stick to the bottom of any cutting board, but it would be a permanent stick on, so both sides of the cutting board wouldn't be used. Not everyone would like that, but that's still an option.

 

I put the idea on kickstarter to hopefully raise some capitol, but I am not counting on it 100% for funding. If I have to, I'll start with a few boards, maybe present it at a home and garden show, or possibly open a small table at a local flea market so get some idea of if this item will sell.

 

Thanks for your suggestions & for viewing my project!

post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFart View Post
 

 

 

While most boards hold bacteria, granite is sealed. Once this chemical sealing takes place, it's virtually water proof.

 

As for as a non slip sheet, that is also a good idea. Silicone is pretty expensive, so it would have to be a very thin sheet, which might not hold up to daily use.

 

I was going to make silicone feet to stick to the bottom of any cutting board, but it would be a permanent stick on, so both sides of the cutting board wouldn't be used. Not everyone would like that, but that's still an option.

 

 

 

Try making a frame (like a picture frame) for the board to sit in.  The granite sits in this frame and is elevated about 1/4" from the counter top and can be taken out of the frame easily enough to clean or to reverse.

 

Even though the granite is sealed, bacteria can still form on a smooth, waterproof surface (think of highly polished s/s medical equipment...) While this is a bonus compared to other cutting board materials, it is not an excuse to not sanitize the board thoroughly after cutting potentially hazardous materials (raw poultry, pork, etc).  Consumers should be aware of this.

 

Don't get me wrong, I like your idea, and I like your approach to the Chef talk community.  However personally, I feel this is not an ideal material for cutting foods on.  It is however an ideal material for cheese boards or other party-platters, and an ideal trivet.

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post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

 

 

Try making a frame (like a picture frame) for the board to sit in.  The granite sits in this frame and is elevated about 1/4" from the counter top and can be taken out of the frame easily enough to clean or to reverse.

 

Even though the granite is sealed, bacteria can still form on a smooth, waterproof surface (think of highly polished s/s medical equipment...) While this is a bonus compared to other cutting board materials, it is not an excuse to not sanitize the board thoroughly after cutting potentially hazardous materials (raw poultry, pork, etc).  Consumers should be aware of this.

 

Don't get me wrong, I like your idea, and I like your approach to the Chef talk community.  However personally, I feel this is not an ideal material for cutting foods on.  It is however an ideal material for cheese boards or other party-platters, and an ideal trivet.

@foodpump

 

another good idea!

 

Maybe I was misunderstood: Yeah, granite can harbor germs, like any other kitchen item, and needs to be sanitized and cleaned like all kitchen equipment.

 

You are a chef, and your knives are probably the most expensive item in your kitchen arsenal. Most chefs won't even allow kitchen help to touch their knives, and prefer to even wash and clean them themselves, so I understand where you're coming from.

 

This board isn't meant to be used in a commercial environment ( every day ), and your idea of cheese or party platter is also another use for the board. I am thinking of people who like to entertain, and would use it every now and then for slicing say fruit, veggies, or cheese ( like you mentioned ) and put it on their table to display their food in a pleasant way.

 

It is pretty heavy, so I don't think most people would use it every day. There are people who buy items that never get used....look in my kitchen cabinets and you'll see some of them...lol.

post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFart View Post
 


Answers:

1) My board will be $15-$20 + shipping. Granite is usually over a million years old. With proper care and use, it should last a lifetime. That's cheaper than having to replace a board every month due to knife cuts in wood or plastic.

2) Yes, granite is harder than the steel blade, and will dull the knife blade. Slicing on the board will be ok, but chopping / cutting should be avoided.

3) Yes, granite is slick. But like anything, practice makes perfect. Slow and steady slicing until you get comfortable with the surface should do the trick.

4) Putting granite into a dishwasher is ok, but having to reseal it more often.

 

You can also use this as a serving dish ( anti-pasto comes to mind ), or to put a warm pot on. The silicone can take heat up to around 350 degrees. The granite itself can withstand heat up to 1200 degrees. Obviously, you won't get it that hot in normal use....lol.

 

This probably isn't a board to use in a commercial environment. It's only 12x12, so home use would be the preferred use.

 

Alright...im getting a better idea of what you are selling. Sorry but its not something i would purchase..... for several reasons.

 

1) how big would this $15-20 item be? 12x12? .... that is not even close to being big enough. Weight would also be a factor.... a 24x36 inch hunk of granite would be very heavy.

 

2) you say you cant chop on it..... right there it would be off my list. (not to mention i love my knives and would not even consider using them on granite)  I need a board that works hard for me and having to have/purchase two boards to do two different jobs is wasted money,space and effort.

 

3) I am very practiced with my knives... I do not wish to practice with a board to get used to it. More so if cannot work on it like a chef....ie: chopping

 

4) something to consider about this "resealing" .... is said resealing product specifically food safe?

 

 

Granite is also brittle... if you drop it, it will break, chip and or shatter. Not to mention it would hurt if it fell on you. I am not saying it wouldn't hurt of a nylon cutting board fell on your foot... but its not a hunk of stone either.

 

 

I see what you are selling more of as a hot pad or service item.....not a cutting board.

post #13 of 28

I will give you an idea to make some money:

 

Market it as a food serving platter, not as a cutting board.

 

Put it in the refrigerator to cool it for serving salads and sushi.

 

Put it in the oven to make it hot to serve hot food on.

 

12" x 12" is too small for a cutting board, in addition to other considerations mentioned by others.

 

dcarch

post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post
 

I will give you an idea to make some money:

 

Market it as a food serving platter, not as a cutting board.

 

 

Both I and Canele already mentioned this.

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post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canele View Post
 

 

Alright...im getting a better idea of what you are selling. Sorry but its not something i would purchase..... for several reasons.

 

1) how big would this $15-20 item be? 12x12? .... that is not even close to being big enough. Weight would also be a factor.... a 24x36 inch hunk of granite would be very heavy.

 

2) you say you cant chop on it..... right there it would be off my list. (not to mention i love my knives and would not even consider using them on granite)  I need a board that works hard for me and having to have/purchase two boards to do two different jobs is wasted money,space and effort.

 

3) I am very practiced with my knives... I do not wish to practice with a board to get used to it. More so if cannot work on it like a chef....ie: chopping

 

4) something to consider about this "resealing" .... is said resealing product specifically food safe?

 

 

Granite is also brittle... if you drop it, it will break, chip and or shatter. Not to mention it would hurt if it fell on you. I am not saying it wouldn't hurt of a nylon cutting board fell on your foot... but its not a hunk of stone either.

 

 

I see what you are selling more of as a hot pad or service item.....not a cutting board.

1) Yes it's heavy, which helps it not move while slicing.

2) I understand. Some want multi-function, but it can also be used to serve.

3) Pretty much the same as no 2. You did practice at chopping, slicing and cutting when you first got into cooking, correct? And learning something new doesn't hurt, but I get your point.

4) Once the sealer penetrates the granite, it does not get on your food.

 

Granite is brittle, correct.

 

I've also mentioned this isn't a commercial use product. Home use would be the preferred use.

post #16 of 28
How exactly do you have to cut so your knife does t get trashed? And how thick is the granite piece? If you continue to cut on a piece of stone, the surface will get damanged....meaning it will become porus regardless of what type of sealer is on it. A piece of granite that is not sealed, but is polished to a mirror finish, will also repel water. You apply a sealer to prevent stains and preserve the beauty of the piece, its is no guarantee that nothing will ever penetrate. I've seen stones that are very well sealed (with both water based and solvent based sealers), but have gotton stains. And now you throw in regular knife use on the surface and in time, you'll have a banged up piece of granite that will soak in liquids. I know you made the argument that granite is over a million years old and will last a life time, but when its cut from the mountain, it is a very porus rock. Its not until the polishing that it will start to repellent water. With regular use, that mirror shine goes away, and so does the sealer, even if its a penetrating sealer. I did stone restoration and refinishing for a number of years, and am quite familiar with the porosity of stone (especially granite and marble) that has different finishes and different sealers applied. Not to mention, have you ever cut a watermelon on a 12x12 board? That would be a mess. Im honestly not trying to bash you or what your doing, but after everything ive seen, the only place granite has in the kitchen is for chocolate and sugar work, not a cutting surface. Then its silly to say there's this new type of cutting board, its really durable, except you have to cut differently on it then on all other cutting boards. And one if you really wanted a granite cutting board, 12x12 granite tiles are too common, go to a role store and pay $8 for a piece, spend 5 minutes sealing it, and then you have your board. The tile would be 1/4 inch thick, and if the ones your selling are cut from slabs, they will probably be 7/8 inch thick, and when used as a cutting surface, that wont matter much.
post #17 of 28

Don't mean to be a downer or negative nancy, but. . . 

 

12 X 12 is a standard floor tile size. It's also suspiciously the same thickness. All around $6-7 at Home Depot. Sounds like you are re-purposing something used in the architecture interiors business and slapping some rubber feet on them and trying to sell them at a 300% profit. 

 

I would never cut anything on stone or glass. Simple. As many stated here, nothing harder than the steel. Just the thought of cutting on a granite floor tile makes my skin crawl. Like scratching a chalk board. 

 

sorry. : (

 

Good luck!!!

post #18 of 28
For all the reasons mentioned above I can't be either an investor, supporter, or customer. But good luck to you in whatever you end up doing.
post #19 of 28
Thread Starter 

Well, after all the comments, I've decided to cancel the project.

 

I do appreciate the positive comments & alternative ideas from @foodpump , @Canele & @dcarch. Thanks for your honest opinions and suggestions.

 

As for floor tile vs counter top tile, mother nature didn't make two different types of granite...granite is granite, but since the project is canceled, it really doesn't matter anymore.


Edited by OldFart - 5/25/15 at 6:13am
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 

I really didn't think $15-$20 was that bad until I found this company. Cheapest one they have is $38.

 

Deer Isle Granite Company.

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFart View Post
 

Well, after all the comments, I've decided to cancel the project.

 

I do appreciate the positive comments & alternative ideas from @foodpump , @Canele & @dcarch. Thanks for your honest opinions and suggestions.

 

As for floor tile vs counter top tile, mother nature didn't make two different types of granite...granite is granite, but since the project is canceled, it really doesn't matter anymore.

Granite is indeed granite, but the "skin crawl" has to do with the hard surface. I called it floor tile because that is, what you are(were) selling. 

post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post
 

Granite is indeed granite, but the "skin crawl" has to do with the hard surface. I called it floor tile because that is, what you are(were) selling. 

1) Never sold one.

2) That was a prototype, and yes, I used the cheapest thing I could find in making the prototype.

3) They are very thick and heavy.

 

But it's ended, so no point in discussing it any further. Not trying to argue with you, just stating points.

 

I like cooking and eating, and getting new cooking ideas, and I don't want to make waves here, and get banned.

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldFart View Post

 

I like cooking and eating, and getting new cooking ideas, and I don't want to make waves here, and get banned.

Excellent.

 

I started cooking because I liked to eat. Then I ate because I liked cooking. Kinda like life influencing art, or art influencing life. :lips:

post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post
 

Excellent.

 

I started cooking because I liked to eat. Then I ate because I liked cooking. Kinda like life influencing art, or art influencing life. :lips:


I hear ya...I don't know anyone who doesn't like to eat ...lol

 

My mother is Japanese, and makes the best Japanese cuisine...of course, no one makes better food than your own mother, right?...I must be biased...lol

post #25 of 28

Just for the heck of it, if you look up Poissan's Ratio you will understand why things as hard as granite WILL NEVER WORK for anything sharper than a butter knife or cheap pointed crest serrated when it comes to preventing dulling.  It simply will not work for anything requiring a keen edge.

 

 

Rick

post #26 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

Just for the heck of it, if you look up Poissan's Ratio you will understand why things as hard as granite WILL NEVER WORK for anything sharper than a butter knife or cheap pointed crest serrated when it comes to preventing dulling.  It simply will not work for anything requiring a keen edge.

 

 

Rick


I buy cheap knives, so I constantly have to sharpen them anyway, so using granite doesn't bother me.

post #27 of 28
Just thinking about a granite cutting board makes me cringe. I wouldn't use one, if you're looking for being sanitary, by the cheap foldable boards and dispose them.
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post #28 of 28
Anyone interested in a concrete cutting board? Lol
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